Trump’s nuclear bailout could cost consumers up to $17 billion each year

June 7, 2018 by  
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The Trump Administration is taking unprecedented steps to bail out failing nuclear and coal power plants, effectively nationalizing the American energy market with potentially drastic consequences for the renewable energy industry and the American consumer. According to an updated report from the Nuclear Information and Resource Service (NIRS), the Trump Administration’s plan could result in artificially high electricity prices. The planned subsidies for nuclear power plants alone could increase the overall cost of electricity in the U.S. by up to $17 billion each year; the subsidies for coal plants would add even more. This skewing of the American energy market, which has recently seen significant progress made by wind and solar energy, could also result in the decline of renewable energy in the U.S. “By pushing for a nationwide bailout for nuclear power and coal, the Trump administration is rushing headlong into an energy buzz saw, and they don’t even seem to know it,” NIRS executive director Tim Judson said in a statement. It should come as no surprise to those who have followed President Trump that he would take steps to support coal and nuclear power at the expense of renewable energy. What is surprising is the heavy-handedness with which his administration is attempting to directly subsidize failing businesses, thereby ignoring the Republican Party’s long-held belief in the supremacy of a market free from government intrusion. By doing so, Trump could decimate the renewable energy industry, which employs more American workers than coal and nuclear combined. Related: Trump orders Perry to take steps to curb coal plant shutdowns The administration claims that it must act to save failing coal and nuclear plants in the interest of national security. Not everyone is buying that excuse. “The Administration’s warnings of dire effects from power shortages caused by shortages of reliable and resilient generation are contradicted by all of the bodies with actual responsibility for assuring adequate supplies,” said former member of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Peter A. Bradford. “There are no state or federal energy regulators petitioning DOE for these measures. Indeed, those who have spoken clearly have said that such steps are unnecessary. … As was said in the run-up to the 2003 invasion of Iraq , the facts are being fixed around the desired end result.” In order to enact its bailout policies, the Trump Administration has three options: Congressional action, review and approval by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission or a formal National Security Council assessment. While the bailouts are likely to be delayed for the foreseeable future, if they even occur, the Trump Administration’s decision to subsidize failing power plants at the expense of American industry and consumer well-being makes its priorities quite clear. + Nuclear Information & Resource Service Images via GorissM and Ron Reiring

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Trump’s nuclear bailout could cost consumers up to $17 billion each year

Broccoli powder could pack a veggie punch in smoothies, soups and lattes

June 7, 2018 by  
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Do you consume the recommended serving of vegetables every day? Last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a study finding only one in 10 adults eat enough vegetables or fruit. Scientists in Australia — a country where the average person also isn’t getting the recommended daily veggie intake — came up with a possible solution: broccoli powder . A Melbourne-area cafe, Commonfolk Coffee , recently tested it out with a latte. How do you take your coffee? Milk, sugar…broccoli powder? There's a new latte shaking up Melbourne's coffee culture. #TenNews @CaryRachel pic.twitter.com/FBMv0JYkkq — Ten News Melbourne (@tennewsmelb) June 6, 2018 Australian science agency  Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) and Hort Innovation developed broccoli powder that provides one serving of broccoli in two tablespoons. They created it using what CSIRO called imperfect-looking broccoli — produce that otherwise might have been trashed. Related: Korean barista creates incredible works of latte art The Melbourne cafe’s broccoli lattes received mixed reviews — in a Ten News Melbourne video , one person said it wasn’t bad; another person said they liked it but described the taste as “milky broccoli.” But there are other uses for the powder for those who can’t stomach a broccoli latte, like in soups, smoothies or baked goods, according to Hort Innovation CEO John Lloyd. “With a rising trend in healthy eating across the board, Australian growers are always looking at ways to diversify their products and cut waste while meeting consumer demand,” Lloyd said in a statement . “Research shows the average Australian is still not eating the recommended daily intake of vegetables a day, and options such as broccoli powder will help address this.” ?????????… …nah but drink whatever floats your boat. Although can you really go past a sustainable and ethical single origin espresso *sans broccoli* ????? > > > #broccolatte #broccocino #coffee #cafe #cafes #melbourne #instacoffee #coffeeoftheday #coffeelovers #vsco #vscocam #vsco_hub #vscobest #vsco_best #vscogood #vscocamphotos #vscofeature #liveauthentic #MKexplore #neverstopexploring #letsgosomewhere #shootaward #igmasters #justgoshoot A post shared by C O M M O N F O L K (@commonfolkcoffee) on Jun 6, 2018 at 1:15am PDT Whole broccoli goes into the 100 percent broccoli powder, which is made through pre-treatment and drying processes. The final product keeps the nutrient composition, color and flavor of fresh broccoli, according to CSIRO. Lead researcher Mary Ann Augustin said broccoli’s high fiber and protein content, as well as bioactive phytochemicals, means the vegetable is an ideal candidate to turn into powder. John Said, managing director of leading broccoli producer  Fresh Select , seems to be on board, describing the project as “the emerging new food trend.” He said farmers in Australia “will have access to an alternative market whilst improving farm yields and sustainability.” + CSIRO Image via CSIRO

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Broccoli powder could pack a veggie punch in smoothies, soups and lattes

Denmark to end subsidies for renewables much sooner than anyone thought possible

April 28, 2017 by  
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The renewable energy industry is performing extremely well in Denmark . The country’s energy minister Lars Christian Lilleholt said it’s performing so well, they’ll be able to stop providing state support for clean energy providers in just a few years. Denmark’s renewable energy industry will be able to stand on its own, and Lilleholt said he could not have predicted this outcome even last year. Denmark’s renewable energy industry needed subsidies for over 40 years. But soon they’ll be able to survive without a boost from the government. According to Lilleholt, the country’s experience shows it’s no longer cheaper to produce coal than renewables. The milestone is even more crucial right as the direction of global energy policies is uncertain while United States President Donald Trump embarks on an ill-advised attempt to revive coal . According to Bloomberg, the president has “made clear he’s an enemy of wind power .” Related: Denmark just broke its own wind power record for the second year in a row Lilleholt said technology will help clean energy become even more efficient and said “already today, it’s impossible to build a new coal power plant without support.” A government-appointed panel gave him the findings on the energy future of Denmark, and said the country is set to meet power needs entirely with renewable energy by 2050. Half the country’s energy requirement could be supplied by renewables as soon as 2030. The panel thinks a large amount of new capacity will be constructed without subsidies. Industry members seem just as surprised as Lilleholt. Outgoing CEO of engineering firm Danfoss Niels B. Christiansen thinks the price of producing renewable energy could fall below market electricity prices between 2020 and 2030, saying, “A year ago, it was debatable whether renewable energy costs could drop so low. But everyone’s now thinking that it will probably happen sooner.” Denmark is home to both the world’s largest wind turbine manufacturer and world’s largest offshore wind farm operator, Vestas Wind Systems A/S and Dong Energy A/S . Via Bloomberg Images via Wikimedia Commons and courtesy of Vestas Wind Systems A/S

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Denmark to end subsidies for renewables much sooner than anyone thought possible

35 Congressmen Move to Kill $122 Billion in Subsidies to Big Oil

October 18, 2011 by  
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Photo credit: EricaJoy via Flickr/CC BY Who likes oil subsidies? Nobody! Nobody but the oil companies, that is. But as we know, these subsidies, which American taxpayers annually spend billions of dollars on, are extremely difficult to kill . But 35 US congressmen and women are going to try: They’ve just drafted a motion to the so-called ‘super committee’ charged with reducing the deficit, asking it to remove $122 billion worth of oil subsidies from the federal budget. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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35 Congressmen Move to Kill $122 Billion in Subsidies to Big Oil

Windstalk Concept Removes Blades from Wind Power!

October 18, 2011 by  
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Atelier DNA /Promo image Like Awesome-Looking Giant Blades of Grass Wind turbines are probably here to stay. Over time they’ll become more efficient by moving offshore, where the wind blows stronger and more constantly, and by becoming bigger and more sophisticated (special blade shapes, lighter materials, better internal components in the nacelle, etc). But the general principle of using rotating blades to capture the kinetic energy of the wind and convert it into clean electricity probably won’t change too much… But that doesn’t mean that there isn’t other ways to harness the pow… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Windstalk Concept Removes Blades from Wind Power!

The U.S. Now Uses More Corn for Fuel Than Feed!

October 11, 2011 by  
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Photo: Flickr , CC Madness! And I don’t mean the British band… The corn ethanol supporters are probably not very familiar with the concept of opportunity cost. Either that, or the subsidies and high corn prices are just to juicy to give up. Only about 20% of all the corn grown in the U.S. now goes to feed humans directly, and more than half of what remains is now being turned into ethanol fuel. The problem is that life-cycle studies show that corn ethanol ranges from barely better than fossil-fuel gasoline to significantly… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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The U.S. Now Uses More Corn for Fuel Than Feed!

Glittering Pavilion Of Recycled Cans Rises Up In Bat-Yam, Israel

October 11, 2011 by  
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Photos: via Recyclart There’s more than one way to recycle a can, and designers of this shining pavilion made of large, recycled cans in Bat-Yam, Israel demonstrate how a simple collection of cans can be used to re-define public space. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Glittering Pavilion Of Recycled Cans Rises Up In Bat-Yam, Israel

Fossil Fuel Subsidies to Hit $660 Billion by 2020

October 4, 2011 by  
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Photo credit: skampy via Flickr/CC BY Fossil Fuel Subsidies Ballooned by $110 Billion Last Year It could take all afternoon to list the myriad reasons that more fossil fuel subsidies are the last thing we need right now. So suffice to say that so as long as they remain in place, they’ll continue to give dirty energy sources like coal and oil an even more massive advantage over renewables — and they’ll keep emptying taxpayer pockets to aid the most profitable companies in history. But more fossil fuel subsidies is what we’re going… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Fossil Fuel Subsidies to Hit $660 Billion by 2020

Moving Planet: What Are You Doing to Move Beyond Fossil Fuels?

September 22, 2011 by  
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Moving Planet, 24th September 2011 will be a day of action against climate change- a day to put our demands for climate action into motion—marching, biking, skating—calling for the world to go beyond fossil fuels. Moving Planet is an international day of action planned by 350.org . It is intended to build support for moving the planet away from fossil fuels and towards sustainable transportation. On September 24, 2011 participants from over 175 countries will hold events aimed at solving the climate change crisis by eliminating our global dependence on fossil fuels. What is the Goal of the Day? The goal is to get moving beyond fossil fuels—both symbolically by pouring into the streets in the thousands on foot, bicycle and other means of sustainable movement, and politically by bringing powerful demands to our leaders that day to move beyond fossil fuels to a 350 ppm world. Mobilizing for individual and community solutions will continue to be important— but one of the main goals for Moving Planet is to demand government action, especially in places where governments are stalling on climate action despite the overwhelming urgency of the science.  The Moving Planet is not just about sustainable actions- but also about delivering a clear list of demands. Science-based policies to get us back to 350 ppm. A rapid, just transition to zero carbon emissions. A mobilization of funding for a fair transition to a 350 ppm world. Lifting the rights of people over the rights of polluters.  What is a 350 ppm World? The ideology behind 350.org’s campaign is the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. For all of human history until about 200 years ago, our atmosphere contained 275 parts per million of carbon dioxide. By now—the planet has about 392 parts per million CO 2  – and this number is rising by about 2 parts per million every year. Scientists are now saying that’s too much – that number is higher than any time seen in the recorded history of our planet.  350 parts per million is what many scientists, climate experts, and progressive national governments are now saying is the safe upper limit for CO 2  in our atmosphere. Why Focus on Moving Away from Fossil Fuels? The global fossil fuel infrastructure is a threat to our future everywhere, polluting our oceans, our land, our communities, our air, and our children’s lungs. It’s corrupting our politics with over $600 billion in subsidies globally, and hundreds of millions in campaign contributions in the United States in the last 10 years. The continued burning of coal and oil is what will tip climate change into climate catastrophe – getting off fossil fuels is the number one thing we need to do to get below 350ppm. Fossil fuels connect to many issues—sustainable agriculture, transportation, and water to name a few. What is Everyone Doing and What Action Can You Take to Join In? Some of the events happening include- Students in the Dominican Republic are painting the first bike lanes in Santo Domingo. Hundreds in Ukraine will be “flash-dancing” in the main square of Kiev. A massive parade is planned in Egypt , where participants will wear blue clothing to form a giant human Nile river. Hundreds of Parisians will unite to form an image of a wind-turbine. In New York , a giant bike ride calling for climate action will end at the United Nations General Assembly. You can find an event happening in your area or start your own!

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Moving Planet: What Are You Doing to Move Beyond Fossil Fuels?

Why Won’t Big Oil Subsidies Die?

September 13, 2011 by  
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Photo: Feathered Tar via Flickr/CC BY One More Time With Feeling: Obama Calls to Kill Big Oil Subsidies Every year, the American taxpayer writes a check to Big Oil — and that’s on top of buying petroleum-based products and paying through the nose for increasingly expensive gasoline. Uncle Sam also directs billions of dollars to the likes of ExxonMobil and Chevron, despite the fact that they’re some of the most profitable companies on earth. These companies receive $4 billion in what

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