REBRANDED transforms factory-rejects into cool streetwear

March 23, 2022 by  
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REBRANDED is a new sustainable clothing line out of Los Angeles. Launched in February 2022, REBRANDED wants to revolutionize the way we view fashion . Inhabitat sat down with founder and CEO Tricia Hoke to discuss what inspired this new fashion line of discarded materials. “Every day, thousands of products go to waste at the factory level due to error and imperfection,” the brand states. “These items are typically discarded, causing waste and harm to the environment. REBRANDED takes these “unwanted” and “unworthy” items, using the materials to create new, reinvented, rebranded pieces of clothing.” Related: Shop sustainably and buy resale fashion at myGemma Inspired by culture, music and artists, REBRANDED offers unique streetwear style . We asked Hoke what led her to launch this new brand in the busy fashion landscape. Tell us a little bit about the backstory on REBRANDED and what your mission is with this line. Hoke:  Sustainability and streetwear typically do not play together, but with REBRANDED, we take the angst and the magic of streetwear culture and cross-pollinate it with social responsibility and environmental concern.  We “rescue” abandoned clothing production lots and rejected products — saving them from the landfill , fast-fashion outlet retailers, and even from burning alive — paying the factories fair value in the process. We re-imagine, re-invent, and re-brand these garments into designer goods, often employing more people at a fair wage, and offer our customers limited edition “drops” on products that otherwise may have been left for dead. What makes REBRANDED sustainable? Hoke:  Brands hire factories (often overseas) to produce their garments, and somewhere during that process … sometimes … things go awry. Brands have to have quality standards. If their garments do not fit right, or the colors do not match what’s in stock already for instance, then they have to reject the goods. The sad part about this is that the factories have usually finished sewing and packing the garments. So when the brand rightfully (or not so rightfully) rejects the products, it’s the workers who suffer. In some cases, the factories can not pay the sewing teams and may even have to shut down. In most of these cases, the brand does not allow the factory to sell the goods. (Rightfully so, no brand wants a poor quality product with their name on it hitting the street.) So these items get dumped into the garbage , abandoned at the port, and sometimes even burned. This is where we come in. The brand or the factory will request us to “rescue” their rejected production. We then will assess the issue(s) and then will make a plan to create a more awesome product in its place.  Say it’s a t-shirt with the wrong label (oops). If it’s a bomb shirt, we may just relabel it, print on it, or dye it a new color; the opportunities are endless. Say it’s something more complicated like a trench coat where the fit was off? Well in this case we will use as much of the product as we can, and we turn the “problems” into a design challenge, aiming to create a beautiful limited edition fashion piece. What are your favorite pieces from the current line, and why? Hoke:  From our current line, I think my favorite pieces are the Kintsugi tee. We love the idea of something broken and cracked getting put back together with literal gold , making it much more valuable than it was in the first place.   It speaks to the underdog in all of us. Every time you have been broken, what did you do? You came back better and stronger than before. All of our products tell the “origin” story on their labels, and we even have more “back story” information that you can access from the tag on the inside. The print on the side of this shirt says, “I WAS DEEMED UNWORTHY.” There is an angsty beauty about it. That’s life, you know. All the ups and downs. Sometimes you have to get a little pissed off and let people know they made a mistake misjudging you. What are your plans for the future of the line? What’s your vision for the future of fashion? Hoke:  This is our first drop of many, many tees that were abandoned at the Long Beach port! We have some amazing influencer collaborations, wholesale and retail opportunities on the horizon. I think the best thing about where we are going is that we have the opportunity to be the “broker” of success for future failures, and the next time a brand or a factory has a real mess-up in production, they won’t have to hide it or shove it under the proverbial rug!  They can come to us at REBRANDED, and we will work with them to make sure their products are discreetly turned into a redemption story like no other! + REBRANDED Images via REBRANDED

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Fisker is taking reservations for an EV no one has seen

March 21, 2022 by  
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If you have $250 you want to put down on an interesting bet, Fisker is taking reservations for its new PEAR EV . The problem? No one has ever seen the PEAR or knows what it looks like. There aren’t even photos on the website. It feels a bit tempting anyway, though. Why? Because this EV is being made in partnership with Foxconn, which bought a former General Motors factory in Ohio to act as a contract manufacturer for the PEAR and the Endurance pickup. This may all sound a bit confusing. That’s because it’s never been done before. Fisker, an all-electric car company, is determined to build EVs and make them affordable this time. On this project, they’re pulling a Tesla and forming partnerships with other automakers (Tesla depended heavily on Lotus for a while for body parts, among other things). So, the photos might be the last thing pinned down as the PEAR is fleshed out into reality. Fisker is contracting with other companies for production facilities and electronics partnerships to make it happen. Related: This net-zero Big Sur home has enough power to charge EVs Fisker’s first production model, the $37,499 Ocean electric crossover SUV, will start production in November of 2022. Assembly will occur in Magna’s Austrian factory after attempts to use the VW platform fell through. The PEAR isn’t due out until 2024. The Ocean and PEAR models will get electronics from Sharp, part of Foxconn. While Fisker is known for building beautiful cars, the challenge will be creating something impactful and stylish at this price point for a young company still finding its way. That said, $250 to be in on the PEAR is still a tempting offer. As one commenter on Green Car Reports said, “I doubt we will see this car anytime soon. They don’t even have a show model to demonstrate. But I am hopeful that they can produce a car that will be affordable for the average buyer.” + Fisker Motors Via Green Car Reports Images via Fisker

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Fisker is taking reservations for an EV no one has seen

A mobile greenhouse to grow your garden’s possibilities

March 7, 2022 by  
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Many people dream of having their own greenhouse , but let’s face it, it can be impractical. The Bramber mobile greenhouse makes these greenhouse dreams easier to achieve. Bramber can be moved around as needed to get more or less sun and taken with you when you switch residences. This mobile greenhouse does everything larger greenhouses do but backward and on wheels. Bramber’s design is deceptively simple. The hardware allows the safety glass to be replaced and makes maintenance easy. The glass lid can open and be fixed in multiple positions. Two handles allow the greenhouse to roll like a wheelbarrow. Raise and tilt the windows to water plants whenever you want. Related: Massive greenhouse wins award for sustainable design The Bramber is built with stainless steel and aluminum finished with two layers of powder coat. Safety glass fills all the spaces in between. This is a tough design made for durability and longevity. In fact, Revised believes in the Bramber so much that it comes with a 100-year guarantee. Bramber designer David Le Versha has always been influenced by history . He is a British designer who draws inspiration from the designs of the Victorian Era, using cast iron to create designs that bring this earlier style to mind. Le Versha applied his iron techniques to aluminum and stainless steel. The resulting greenhouse looks like a Victorian antique, right down to the style of the wheels and the handles used to pull it along. You can see the charm of the Old World in every line of the design. The Bramber greenhouse opens up huge possibilities for your home garden. Its mobility means you don’t have to stick to any certain plants or plans. You can change what you grow, how much sunlight the plants get and where your greenhouse sits. All these capabilities come with the charm of historic, classic design. + Revised Images via Revised

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A mobile greenhouse to grow your garden’s possibilities

Sustainable bamboo makes up these off-grid eco-resorts

March 7, 2022 by  
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Nomadic Resorts is at it again, designing a bamboo treehouse resort called Playa Viva in Mexico for an off-grid eco-vacation adventure. Inspired by the Mobula Rays that migrate off the shore of the resort, the project employed local construction workers and used sustainable bamboo and site-sourced materials. The result is these gorgeous bamboo buildings with open windows. They were designed in partnership with David Leventhal, pioneer of the regenerative travel movement. Leventhal reached out to Nomadic Resorts, an eco-resort design studio, to develop six extra “rooms” for his eco-lodge Playa Viva. Related: Energy efficient bamboo device in Vietnam is a cooling system The buildings are naturally ventilated and surrounded by nature.”The design of the bamboo treehouses offered us a unique opportunity to develop a cutting-edge bamboo structure in an incredible location without compromising our environmental ethos. It was an enriching experience to work with a client like David, as he is completely in tune with our designphilosophy,” said Olav Bruin, Atelier Nomadic’s creative director. Each pod looks out over gorgeous views of the beach and includes unique lattice structure walls and angled roofs. Coconut palms were also transplanted to be used to support the buildings. Hyperbolic paraboloid roofs were fixed to the trunks before the prefab panels were put into place to support them. The beach huts look unique from every angle. Even better, they are well suited to the warm environment and still offer privacy for guests. The design was intended to serve the post- COVID traveler’s preference to stay in exciting but healthy accommodations, immersed in the natural environment. Inside, the huts fit a dining area, bed and a couple of chairs, with a retractable curtain across the doorway for added privacy at night. “This is beyond wellness , it’s catharsis,” said Nomadic Resorts CEO Louis Thompson. Nomadic Resorts specializes in creating eco-friendly stays, from tented pods to treehouses. Working out of offices in the Netherlands and Mauritius, the Nomadic Resorts design team focuses on sustainable projects. + Nomadic Resorts Images via Nomadic Resorts

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Sustainable bamboo makes up these off-grid eco-resorts

Eco-Cool: Brands Offering Sustainability With Style

March 7, 2022 by  
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Old-school environmentalists, with their emphasis on function over form, have a certain aesthetic that can… The post Eco-Cool: Brands Offering Sustainability With Style appeared first on Earth911.

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Upcycling and sustainability fuel these two fashion designers

February 28, 2022 by  
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The hottest fashion designers are turning to the past to create the style of the future. Two Phoenix-based designers, YEK and Samantha Vo, will have their work featured in a new Facebook travel series. Inspired by tradition and fueled by upcycling , their creations bring the past and present together to create the looks of tomorrow. View this post on Instagram A post shared by @dwn2mrz YEK drew from his Indigenous heritage to create his moccasin sneakers. Vo was inspired by her Mexican heritage and vintage military styles to transform military surplus bags into new, fashionable works. Inhabitat interviewed these two designers to explore how they’re using sustainable materials and practices for fashion . All of your bags are sold out! When’s the best time for shoppers to look for your bags, and is it possible to pre-order bags? Vo:  At the moment, I’m still getting into the flow of producing bags as it is a timely process for me since I make them myself and from my home studio. The best way to find out about my drops is through my Instagram  @dwn2mrz . For now, commissions are closed, so I can focus on the next set of designs. What are your bags made from? Vo:  My bags are made from military surplus and thrifted materials. I source everywhere from thrift stores, garage sales and Facebook Marketplace. What gave you the idea to create these designs? Vo:  I had so many military surplus liner jackets I had collected and stopped wearing. I loved the material and wanted to reimagine another use for it. I’ve made everything from bags, laptop cases and planters. The bags stuck the most for me, so I started making “mini totes” for my friends out of heavy-duty military surplus fabrics. When did you get interested in fashion design? What was the first thing you ever designed? Vo:  I’ve always been interested in fashion design , but I thought of it as a very formal craft. It’s been nice exploring my own process within it. The first thing I ever designed was Selena’s Astrodome outfit with my mom. What are your sneakers made of? YEK:  Until we have the opportunity and resources to create our own silhouettes, we generally find slightly used sneakers , then use recycled lambskin leather to make the woven tassels. The nickel conchos and buckles we use are sourced from a local leather supply store. What gave you the idea for this unique design? YEK:  Besides the pride for my Indigenous roots, Japanese-Americana has been highly influential for me in the past few years. Frankly, it’s provided a sense of confidence in my Native designs, knowing that they can be appreciated by a vast audience and are becoming more socially accepted. What inspired you to get into fashion design? YEK:  Growing up, art was a constant motivator in my life. Studying my dad’s sketching style and my brother’s graffiti techniques helped set an artistic foundation for me. In my teens, I discovered a love for sneakers. Specifically, I collected Nike SBs, which fed my artistic mind even more. Their shoe designs and color palettes in the early 2000s were abstract and even had themes for each pair. Sneakers then led to an appreciation for clothes , and eventually, I worked a handful of retail jobs/internships. Although it seems like much has played its role, my family tree takes things deeper. My Mexican grandmother would make dresses for my mom as a child, while my Lakota grandmother would make star quilts for all her grandchildren. Hard to say there’s a particular thing that inspired me to get into fashion, this kind of just seems like the right path for me. I’m excited for what the future holds. Where can people buy your shoes? Y:  Our website ( yek0ne.xyz ) solely showcases the work. For now, the best way to place an order is by messaging me directly via Instagram  @yek0ne . View this post on Instagram A post shared by yek (@yek0ne) These two designers are certainly following the idea of “reuse, repurpose and recycle,” or in this case, upcycle. By upcycling, fashion designers can conserve resources and prevent pollution . This way, waste that would otherwise end up in landfills or the oceans is never created at all. Aesthetically, upcycling also allows yesterday’s waste to pave the way toward a more sustainable, energy-efficient future. Young designers like Vo and YEK use upcycling to create brand-new, sustainable fashions that can inform the designs of tomorrow. Inspired by their cultural roots and with an eye on the future of style, Vo and YEK are part of a new generation of designers changing the fashion landscape for the better. Both Vo and YEK are featured in the first episode of the Facebook series “On the Map.” The series showcases innovators around the United States. Check out episode one of “On the Map”  here . + Samantha Vo + YEK Images via Pexels, Samantha Vo and YEK

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Upcycling and sustainability fuel these two fashion designers

Make your own ethical fashion from recycled plastic nets

February 15, 2022 by  
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The Risacca Project aims to turn the oceans’ garbage patches filled with plastic pollution into more than a dystopian memory. They’re using recycled nets recovered from the ocean to create ethical fashion. In fact, they’re giving you the opportunity to visit their lab and create your own upcycled products with their machines. The idea: to recover more and more plastic and turn it into everything from pens to outdoor furniture . The dream is to start in Periferica, a cultural park in Mazara, but then create new centers in every Italian port. Related: Notpla plant-based packaging is helping the world plastic problem Half the waste in garbage patches like those discovered in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans are from fishing nets abandoned at sea. “With a ton of net, you can get 200 chairs, 2,000 covers, 10,000 buttons and many other objects that are part of our daily life,” the team said. “But to do this, three ingredients are needed: a team of experts, a participatory community and a laboratory .” The Risacca Project wanted to create the first lab specialized in the recycling and reuse of fishing nets in Mazara del Vallo, Sicily . The location is where the designers are from and many fishermen use these kinds of nets. The founding team set out to create a “social tailoring and recycling center where artisans and operators will be able to take care of all phases of product regeneration.” Products available through Kickstarter for supporting the Risacca Project include a shopping bag, 3D tile , clutch bag, Undertow recovered mesh bag and a rattan pot that looks like a purse made in the style of a lobster trap. You can also make your own products in the lab with the expertise of the design team on loan. The founding team is made up of three professionals with backgrounds in design, regeneration and impact. They are based in Mazara, which is a historic fishing port. Mazara has been experiencing a recent crisis of unemployment and generational aging out of the working population, so the team wanted to create an innovative way to generate jobs while protecting the environment. “In Mazara, every year more than 10 tons of fishing nets are discarded whose disposal costs weigh on the economies of fishermen, who are sometimes forced to resort to illegal methods of disposal,” said the team. “Through the laboratory, we will be able to recover tons of nets and generate an impact for the community .” + Project Risacca Images via Project Risacca

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Make your own ethical fashion from recycled plastic nets

Canton Avenue harkens back to the Silk Road of China

January 21, 2022 by  
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The Canton Avenue by MOK Design for the Westin Pazhou Hotel in Guangzhou is a walk back in time, revisiting the days when the hotel was a stop on the historic Silk Road of China . The Westin Pazhou Hotel Guangzhou was jointly built by China Foreign Trade Center (Group) and Starwood Hotels and Resorts International Group. It is located in the center of the Guangzhou International Convention & Exhibition Center, with views of the city and the Pearl River. Entering in, the exhibition halls of the Canton Avenue can be reached through a sky corridor from the hotel directly. There are also a series of sunrooms and green space installations inside the hotel has integrated the renovated building into the surrounding landscape. Related: Grass-roofed arches and planted terraces bring nature into this modern bazaar in India A unique green lawn built into the lobby of the hotel brings daylight and air circulation indoors. There are also multiple floor and wall plantings that freshen the timeless design of the space. Central to the lobby is Canton Bazaar, an all-day garden restaurant and lobby bar combined with an outdoor sunroom. Decorated with mosaics and terrazzo floor, the sunroom was designed to combine a traditional and modern style. The space can accommodate up to 107 people for dining. Food in the Canton Bazaar follows a Cantonese food market theme. There are fresh ingredients reminiscent of the Canton Fair, the historical Maritime Silk Road, and the Lingnan culture of the Guangdong region. Most notable about the redesign is the use of green plants throughout, including the lobby and restaurant . The MOK Design team focused on both green spaces to create a healthy indoor environment and an update of the style to create a modern sleek take on the Silk Road. Details feature elements of porcelain, bronze and Cantonese embroidery. A hotel mosaic mural featuring ships sailing to port from around the world was originally created by contemporary artist Ms. Zhang Haiyan. She drew the manuscript of this mosaic mural with colored lead along with designer Li Yanfang. The manuscript was sent to an Italian mosaic factory to be used in the making of the wall mural. The main elements of the screen include: the Zhenhai Tower, bombax ceiba cotton-tree flowers, the harbor, Guangzhou Tower, merchant ships, seagulls and cloud patterns. It brings to mind the international sea trade that historically made this city a successful port. The hotel uses a neutral color palette and judicious use of quality ornamentation to evoke tranquility toward its visitors. There is thoughtful use of glass screens, greenery, marble and light and dark brown tones to balance the space. + MOK Design Photography by Zhang Jing and Weng Xiaodong

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Canton Avenue harkens back to the Silk Road of China

This outdoor furniture line uses upcycled rice hulls that outperform wood

September 29, 2021 by  
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Michigan-based furniture manufacturing company Grand Rapids Chair Company has unveiled a sustainable addition to its repertoire of personalized chairs and tables. The Bowen Collection is a classically framed  table  with a twist — its top surface material is made using an ultra-durable blend of upcycled rice hulls that would have otherwise gone to waste . This agricultural byproduct of rice farming, called acre, actually holds up better than traditional wood, according to the company. Acre mimics the style of wood while providing upgraded weather, pest, water and UV damage resistance. It’s also guaranteed not to rot, crack or splinter. Acre is extremely lightweight and free from phenol,  formaldehyde  and adhesive that could off-gas into potentially harmful VOCs. Related: Designer Lucas Couto joins Precious Plastic for recycling project Veteran designers for the company, Tim Stoepker and Sara Gesink, are responsible for the collection’s aesthetic. “We landed on the picnic style slat design which we felt really spoke well to the community and the togetherness aspect of a picnic table, but higher end,” said Gesink while describing the design process. “With the hoop leg, it could visually fit inside in different environments versus going picnic style with the leg,” added Stoepker. The tables are manufactured locally in the Grand Rapids facility with rice hulls produced in Mississippi to minimize the company’s  carbon footprint. Buyers can choose between three heights for the Bowen table, including dining, counter and bar sizes, as well as pedestal and communal designs that come in 11 different stains colors. Additionally, the  steel  base for the pedestal design comes in 150 different powder coats. For those interested in using their table in an area that gets a lot of sun, there’s an option for adding an umbrella hole that fits any standard-sized umbrella in the center. Prices start at $1,006 for the pedestal table and $2,507 for the communal table. + Grand Rapids Chair Company Photography by Dean Van Dis

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This outdoor furniture line uses upcycled rice hulls that outperform wood

Greta Thunberg slams global leaders for their "blah, blah, blah"

September 29, 2021 by  
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Eighteen-year-old environmental activist Greta Thunberg has condemned global leaders for their lack of action to address the climate crisis . The outspoken activist has dismissed their words as empty talk.  Thunberg quoted U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson , saying, “This is not some expensive, politically correct, green act of bunny hugging.” She argues that global leaders have failed to live up to promises they made. Related: Rainn Wilson launches climate change web series featuring Greta Thunberg At the Youth4Climate summit in Milan on Tuesday, Thunberg called on world leaders to issue and commit to more stringent pledges. She also highlighted that carbon emissions continue to rise, despite many countries pledging to cut emissions. According to the U.N., carbon emissions are  on track to rise by 16% by 2030 . This is contrary to global environmental goals of reducing emissions to keep global heating below 1.5 degrees Celsius.  “Build back better. Blah, blah, blah. Green economy . Blah blah blah. Net zero by 2050. Blah, blah, blah,” Thunberg said in a speech. “This is all we hear from our so-called leaders. Words that sound great but so far have not led to action. Our hopes and ambitions drown in their empty promises.” Her speech comes as global leaders prepare for the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow on Oct. 31. High polluting countries such as the U.S. and China have been challenged to deliver tougher pledges to stop global temperatures from rising. While Thunberg agrees that there is a need for dialogue among global citizens, she has expressed her worries about the lack of action . She notes that, for over 30 years, global leaders have issued climate reform pledges without any meaningful action. “Of course we need constructive dialogue,” said Thunberg. “But they’ve now had 30 years of blah, blah, blah and where has that led us? We can still turn this around – it is entirely possible. It will take immediate, drastic annual emission reductions. But not if things go on like today. Our leaders’ intentional lack of action is a betrayal toward all present and future generations.” Via The Guardian Lead image via Anthony Quintano

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Greta Thunberg slams global leaders for their "blah, blah, blah"

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