COBE unveils images of LEED Gold-targeted Adidas HQ in Germany

January 6, 2020 by  
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After a year of operation, sportswear titan Adidas has finally released images of its new LEED Gold-seeking headquarters building in Herzogenaurach, Germany. Designed by Danish architecture firm COBE , the multipurpose building optimizes the work environment with a strong indoor-outdoor connection achieved with walls of glass, soaring skylights and an abundance of greenery throughout the building. Fittingly named HALFTIME, the versatile facility marks COBE’s first completed project in Germany. COBE’s HALFTIME design was selected as the winner of an international architecture competition held by Adidas in 2014. The facility, which officially opened October 12, 2018, is located in the sports brand’s corporate headquarters, “World of Sports,” in southern Germany. The 15,500-square-meter building includes a canteen for all HQ employees, meeting rooms, a conference center , a show room, a large events hall in the style of an old-school gym and 12 creatively styled workshop rooms, each representative of a different sport venue. The building also includes specially designed HALFTIME Chairs, a collaboration between COBE and Danish design brand HAY. Related: Copenhagen’s new eco-friendly “bicycle hills” hide parking for thousands of bicycles To meet LEED Gold standards, the energy-efficient building is topped with a 8,650-square-meter rhomboid roof structure that is covered in glass to flood the interiors with natural light. Large green walls , tall ceilings, a natural materials palette and indoor conservatories cultivate a healthy working environment. Moreover, the architecture features a flexible design for future modifications. “To accommodate the many internal and public functions that HALFTIME includes, we designed a versatile, multipurpose building that brings as many of the company’s activities and functions as possible together under one roof,” said Dan Stubbergaard, architect and founder of COBE. “The huge rhomboid roof covers the entire building like a carpet, bringing staff, visitors and brand ambassadors together in the same building and thus enabling more and wider contacts.” + COBE Images via Rasmus Hjortshøj – COAST / COBE

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COBE unveils images of LEED Gold-targeted Adidas HQ in Germany

Eco-house in Chile thrives in every season

January 2, 2020 by  
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Karina Duque had a unique conundrum to overcome when it came to the design of the KDDK House. Located in Frutillar, Chile , the eco-home’s site had views of lush greenery, in the form of meadows and forests, that presumably made the property so attractive to the landowners. These green views, however, could only be found in the opposite direction of the sun’s natural course. In a region that often saw rainy weather, designing a house that could allow for high-quality indoor livability while avoiding a dark or gloomy interior in such a location was quite the challenge. First, the designer placed the home on the highest point of the property to allow for the best views while also creating the greatest potential for natural sunlight to filter indoors for the greater part of the day. Even better, the elevated building site as well as reflective windows and organically inspired colors and materials help immerse and disguise the home among its lush property. Related: An angular timber cabin is hidden inside an ancient mountain forest The architect took inspiration from the architecture of German settlers, turning to simple lines, an elongated volume, a gable roof and skylights for a contrasting yet relaxing design. This style came with another perk in the form of ample space for a loft that could store heat. The team used painted, locally manufactured zinc for much of the exterior and certified larch roofing for the access corridor. These materials contrasted and complemented the interior, which was painted bright white to make the spaces brighter on those gloomy days. Cellulose insulation (typically made from recycled paper fiber ) for the roof, walls and under the windows helps to maintain heat during cold days, and natural cross-ventilation regulates the indoor temperature during hot days. The addition of a combustion stove in the kitchen serves as a primary heat source during the coldest winter days. In the summer, the iron-and-glass screens fold open to reveal a pleasant outdoor terrace. + Karina Duque Photography by Fernanda Castro via Karina Duque

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Eco-house in Chile thrives in every season

Earth911 Podcast, October 25, 2019: Project Repat — Saving US Jobs & T-Shirts From Landfills

October 25, 2019 by  
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Project Repat, founded by Ross Lohr and Nathan Rothstein, has … The post Earth911 Podcast, October 25, 2019: Project Repat — Saving US Jobs & T-Shirts From Landfills appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Podcast, October 25, 2019: Project Repat — Saving US Jobs & T-Shirts From Landfills

Maven Moment: School Uniforms

September 11, 2019 by  
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Early September always makes me remember the first day of … The post Maven Moment: School Uniforms appeared first on Earth911.com.

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De Stijl-inspired modern home generates all of its own energy

July 10, 2019 by  
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When a couple decided to “break free” from their cookie-cutter home and realize their long-awaited eco-friendly dream home, they turned to Chapel Hill-based architect Arielle Condoret Schechter to bring their vision to life. With their grown son now out of the house, the couple wanted to downsize to a simple modernist home where they could peacefully age in place. Nestled in a secluded place in the woods of Chatham County, North Carolina, the resulting sustainable home is custom-designed to meet all their needs, from achieving net-zero energy to its modernist design with architectural elements inspired by the Netherlands-based De Stijl movement of the early 1900s. Completed earlier this year, the contemporary zero-energy home embraces the outdoors without compromising the clients’ needs for privacy. Along the front, street-facing elevation, architect Arielle Condoret Schechter installed a natural cypress screen that filters light, obscures views and references the surrounding woods. The windows along the front are also placed high up along the fiber cement walls. In contrast, the rear of the property is completely open to the outdoors with a large outdoor deck with full-height windows and walls painted with geometric blocks of primary colors in the style of the De Stijl art movement. “We want a house just for the two of us,” said the clients. “We don’t want to socialize. We want to be left alone to enjoy our life…[and have] a sheltered place to sit outside and watch the rain.” To meet the clients’ needs for aging in place, the architect created an interior with zero thresholds, curb-free showers and oversized doorways. Meanwhile, the couple can watch the outdoors in comfort from the south-facing deck that’s protected by a deeply cantilevered roof. Related: Net-zero Maine house is designed to blend into the forest with age The large roof overhangs around the entire house also help reduce solar heat gain and support a rooftop solar array. Highly efficient insulation wraps the home’s three rectilinear volumes to create an airtight envelope, while an energy recovery ventilator keeps indoor air fresh without producing ozone. In addition to following passive design principles such as maximizing natural light and ventilation wherever possible, the architect also installed windows and doors certified for Passive House Construction to ensure that the house archives Net Zero performance. + Arielle Condoret Schechter Images via Arielle Condoret Schechter

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De Stijl-inspired modern home generates all of its own energy

Repurposed shipping container now holds a trendy beer stand in Tokyo

May 22, 2019 by  
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In a creative project that will appease both advocates of recycling and lovers of food and drink, the designers at I IN used a corrugated metal shipping container to create the Schmatz Beer Stand in Tokyo, Japan. Rather than stepping into a dark shipping container , guests will enter a warm and inviting beer stand completely contrasting with the industrialized exterior. Light timber wood lines both the walls and the floor, matching the exposed wooden bar and bar stools. If there was any confusion as to what type of food the bar serves, one would only need to look to one of the bright neon hot dog signs that adorn the walls. Behind the bar, stainless steel adds a touch of modern in an otherwise industrial design, and clean lines within help keep the necessary uniformity that is essential to such a small space. Related: Shipping container food halls slated to revitalize Southern California neighborhoods Schmatz was inspired by beer stands popularized in Germany, and in true German beer stand fashion, the beers on tap here are in the Kolsch, wheat beer and pilsner styles. The establishment also has German fare such as sausages and pork schnitzel available on the menu. Additionally, the style of the structure took inspiration from the famous Tokyo Dome baseball stadium nearby, just a few miles from the stand. This is evident in the sporty style of the container, with a bar seat setting, beer taps and neon signs. It’s the perfect spot to enjoy a drink before or after a big game. The design team kept the majority of the shipping container’s original exterior, jazzing it up with a fresh coat of paint, gallery lights and large windows to make the tiny interior feel much larger. What’s more, the windows allow potential customers to peer into the beer stand from outside. If there are no seats available, handy “order” and “pick-up” windows allow customers to stop by the establishment with ease without having to come inside. + Schmatz + I IN Images via I IN

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Repurposed shipping container now holds a trendy beer stand in Tokyo

Maven Moment: Hand-Me-Down Clothing

May 15, 2019 by  
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The good old-fashioned tradition of hand-me-downs! It is the most … The post Maven Moment: Hand-Me-Down Clothing appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Maven Moment: Hand-Me-Down Clothing

Maven Moment: Spring Fashion!

March 20, 2019 by  
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Earth911 Podcast, Nov. 8, 2018: Fair Trade Gold and Ethical Jewelry’s Deepest Questions

November 8, 2018 by  
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Mark Choyt, the founder of Reflective Jewelry, talks with Earth911 … The post Earth911 Podcast, Nov. 8, 2018: Fair Trade Gold and Ethical Jewelry’s Deepest Questions appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Podcast, Nov. 8, 2018: Fair Trade Gold and Ethical Jewelry’s Deepest Questions

British Fashion Council commits to a fur-free London Fashion Week

September 7, 2018 by  
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London Fashion Week (LFW) will be the first event of its kind to go fur free. The British Fashion Council just announced that all of the designers at the event this month are excluding animal fur in their clothing lines. The move is a response to the criticism LFW has received over the past two years from activists. More than 250 protesters appeared at LFW last year, a big increase from the 25 that showed up in 2016. With more people boycotting brands that use real fur , companies are starting to switch over to non-fur materials. Caroline Rush of the British Fashion Council said the move to go fur free corresponds to a growing trend in the country. Related: Burberry vows to stop burning unsold clothes and using real fur One major company that plans on eliminating fur from its inventory entirely is Burberry. The British fashion giant recently announced its decision to ditch fur and has initiated a plan to phase out the material over the next few years. Given its popularity in the U.K. , the company hopes other fashion business will follow its lead and stop using animal fur. While it’s great to see that fur will not be a part of LFW this year, the British Fashion Council is not planning on banning it entirely. The head of the organization Stephanie Phair recently explained that the council does “not define or control the creative process of the designers.” Phair added that the U.K. government has not banned fur, and the decision to go fur free is up to individual companies. That said, the British Fashion Council does encourage companies to research more sustainable and cruelty-free materials for their clothing lines. In addition to Burberry, the number of fashion houses going fur free is growing. This includes Gucci, Versace, Stella McCartney, Vivienne Westwood and Yoox Net-A-Porter, among others. + British Fashion Council Via The Guardian Images via Kris Atomic and Charisse Kenion

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British Fashion Council commits to a fur-free London Fashion Week

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