Recyclable aluminum facade wraps BBC Studios new reusable pavilion

November 19, 2019 by  
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BBC Studios, the commercial arm of the BBC group and the biggest producer of TV content in the U.K., has recently unveiled a new, reusable pavilion with a striking facade of fully recyclable, raw aluminum . Installed at Croisette 18 for MIPCOM 2019, the annual TV trade market in Cannes, the new BBC Studios stand comprises two floors of flexible work and hospitality spaces to accommodate the company’s business meetings and events across the four-day market. The building is wrapped in a rippled facade made entirely of aluminum scales angled to let in light and to give the pavilion its dynamic appearance. Previously housed in the Palais venue at MIPCOM, the BBC Studios pavilion marks the company’s first new business space at the four-day event in 20 years. Like the company, the structure has also been fully funded commercially. The overall project direction for the pavilion came from London-based agency Cheerful Twentyfirst , with creative direction provided by Christine Losecaat. Related: Dramatically twisted timber weaves together in the Steampunk pavilion To create a reusable building that could be shipped and installed anywhere in the world, BBC Studios turned to Yorkshire-based Stage One for the construction and detailed design. London-based Giles Miller Studio crafted the sculptural facade, while Universal Design Studio served as the design lead and the interior designers for the project. “From the outset of the brief, it was clear that BBC Studios and Cheerful Twentyfirst had a shared sense of vision and ambition,” said Steve Quah, CEO of Cheerful Twentyfirst. “A project of this huge scale requires a close partnership and trust in delivery. Together with our unique team of collaborative experts — Christine Losecaat MBE, Giles Miller Studio, Universal Design Studio and Stage One — we are proud to deliver a truly unique and exceptional creative project, one that fulfills all our wildest imaginations.” + BBC Studios Images via Cheerful Twentyfirst

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Recyclable aluminum facade wraps BBC Studios new reusable pavilion

A guide to zero-waste holiday travel

November 19, 2019 by  
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It’s the year that the Swedish concept of flygskam, or flying shame, hit headlines around the world. Now, it’s November and time for holiday travel. Unfortunately, you might feel like you’re choosing between hurting the environment and hurting Grandma’s feelings. If you find yourself traveling this time of year, here are some zero-waste tips to take the edge off your travel shame. Planning for zero-waste travel A green trip starts with good planning. If you’re traveling by plane and/or staying in hotels, check out their sustainability policies. Airplanes use a staggering amount of plastic, which they mostly don’t recycle, but some carriers are striving to improve. Air France pledged to switch out 210 million single-use plastic items with sustainable alternatives by the end of this year. Qantas is ditching single-use plastic by the end of 2020. Alaska Airlines traded plastic stirrers for ones made of bamboo or white birch. Related: Designers aim to reduce the waste and impact of airlines Consider buying carbon offsets. Because flights were responsible for 2.4 percent of global energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in 2018, carbon offset programs aim to balance human destructiveness by investing in projects that reduce greenhouse gases, such as planting trees or improving forest management. Several airlines offer this option. Most hotels post info about their sustainability efforts on their websites. You can also opt to stay in an Airbnb or similar, where you’ll be able to cook your own food and eat on reusable plates. Learn more about sustainable hotel resources at Green Key , Green Traveler Guides or Kind Traveler. Don’t forget to prepare your house for travel. Eat, freeze or give away perishables. Unplug lamps and other small appliances. If it’s plugged in, it’s sucking energy . Turn the thermostat down — but not so low that the pipes will burst if you live somewhere cold. Packing for zero-waste travel In a world of disposability and access to cheap stuff, it’s easy to throw something away when it is only slightly damaged. I was going through security in Canada when the agent wanted to look in my backpack. The zipper stuck because of loose threads around a rip. I said, “Oh, I have to get a new one … or maybe sew it.” I truthfully had no intentions to do so. She looked at the tear and said, “It’s a good backpack. You should fix it.” Of course I should! I’ve sewn that tear a couple of times now (I’m obviously not that good at sewing), and the backpack is still traveling with me. Aim to repair, not discard. Most travel experts advise packing lightly, both for ease of travel and to keep weight down on airplanes. I’m more of a medium packer, because I know from experience that if I travel too light, I’ll buy more stuff while traveling. Capsule wardrobes have garnered a lot of press lately as a light packing strategy. This is a set of clothes like tops, pants, skirts and sweaters that can be endlessly mixed and matched together, often in a neutral palette like tan, gray, black and white. If you go neutral, consider including some bright scarves or big necklaces to rev up your look. Related: The sustainable wardrobe — it’s more accessible than you think Pack reusable versions of things that get trashed the most while traveling. Freelance travel writer and animal advocate Lavanya Sunkara said, “I always bring my S’well water bottle, so I never have to purchase a plastic water bottle, plus it keeps the water cold for a long time. I just decided to bring my own coffee mug as well as some non-disposable forks/spoons for the road. I also bring my own soap, shampoo and conditioner in reusable bottles.” For even lighter packing, consider shampoo bars. Don’t forget to pack a reusable bag for grocery shopping or souvenirs, too. Greener transportation Some countries have great train service. In most regions of the U.S., trains are infrequent and cost-prohibitive. However, if you have the time, live in a busy train corridor or are traveling a short enough distance overland, look into trains and buses. People in the Northeast have more trains to choose from. New bus services like Flix Bus, Bolt and Megabus are trying to make bus travel more pleasant; even Greyhound has on-board Wi-Fi now. Consider whether you’ll need a car at your destination. If you’re going to a city with decent public transportation , a bike share program, walkable areas and/or plenty of cabs and ride-share services, maybe you can forego a rental car. Related: How to make American cities bike-friendly If you find yourself soaring through the skies in an airplane, avoid the so-called “service items” — i.e., trash. You brought your own water bottle , right? Well, fill it up at the airport (after you’ve made it through security) so you won’t have to waste cups on the plane. Bring your own snacks and say no to straws, napkins and ice. Minimizing waste at your destination Think how you can be most environmentally conscious at your destination. If you’re snorkeling in the tropics, use reef-safe sunscreen . If you’re strolling the streets of Paris, sit at a sidewalk cafe and drink out of a real cup, rather than getting a disposable cup to go. Travelers doing their own cooking in an Airbnb kitchen can shop for ingredients at farmers markets or in the bulk sections of grocery stores to minimize packaging waste. One of my biggest sources of eco-shame has been using plastic bottles while visiting countries where waterborne diseases are prevalent. But Terry Gardner , an inspiring sustainability warrior who writes for the LA Times and other publications, has convinced me to try a SteriPen next time. “I’ve used a SteriPen in China , Mexico and twice in Peru,” she told me. “I’ve also used it to purify water from lakes in the U.S. I like the USB one that is rechargeable. In China, where we were encouraged to drink bottled water from single-use plastic, I refused and used my SteriPen. I felt good about avoiding the plastic and remained healthy. In Peru, the SteriPen worked great in Lima, Cusco and Machu Picchu, but I couldn’t use it in some places in the Amazon where the water was polluted by hazardous waste (I think it was uranium or some mining byproduct).” In keeping with the zero-waste ideal, Gardner advises, “One of my most important sustainable travel tips is focused on trying to treat every place like a national park — do your best to Leave No Trace.” Depending on your destination and the length of time you’re staying, considering volunteering in some capacity. Maybe instead of trashing a place, we can learn to leave it just a little bit better. Images via Shutterstock and Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat

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A guide to zero-waste holiday travel

Energy-efficient Bluebonnet Studios offers sustainable housing to Austins most vulnerable citizens

July 14, 2017 by  
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The Bluebonnet Studios social housing development in Austin supports a healthy lifestyle through the design. The property, designed by Forge Craft Architecture + Design , provides housing for the homeless, low-income veterans and local musicians. It features forward-thinking sustainable elements such as recycled and locally-sourced materials, a well insulated envelope, optimal orientation, low-flow fixtures and occupancy sensors. The architects worked with a difficult site and a very tight budget, which required a close collaboration between the design, construction, and ownership teams, as well as help of sustainability experts like Pliny Fisk and Jason McLennan . An important aspect of the design was access to natural light , which the team provided by creating a light well that runs through the center of the building. This emphasis on daylight also allows for most of the building to be functional without artificial light in the event of a power outage – including all circulation. Heating and cooling are provided by centralized LG VRF units tied to individual apartment thermostats. Each thermostat is coupled to both window sensors and door-triggered occupancy sensors . All the interior finishes and products were regionally sourced, recycled and healthy. On top of the building, a green space allows for outdoor activities. Related: Top 6 Green Supportive and Low-Income Housing Projects Of the 107 single-occupancy units, 22 are reserved for the area’s homeless and low-income veterans, while five are dedicated to local musicians. Each resident received a small package of tools, including a recycling bin, recycling magnet, green cleaning recipes, and recommendations for conservative thermostat settings to help residents keep their homes green. Additionally, a green housekeeping program provides a dispensing station with Green Seal certified cleaning chemicals for maintenance staff and janitorial contractors. + Forge Craft Architecture + Design Photos by Paul Bardagjy

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Energy-efficient Bluebonnet Studios offers sustainable housing to Austins most vulnerable citizens

Bowl-shaped roofs harvest rainwater and promote natural cooling in arid environments

January 2, 2017 by  
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Water scarcity is felt unequally throughout the world with some regions worse off than others. Iran-based BMDesign Studios addressed their home country’s arid climates with an architectural solution to water shortages called Concave Roof, a double-roof system designed to collect and store rainwater, and promote natural cooling. The Concave Roof was engineered for arid environments, where rainwater collection can be tricky due to higher than average evaporation rates and low annual precipitation. The double-roof system, which includes a domed roof beneath a bowl-shaped catchment area, is designed to “help [make] even the smallest quantities of rain [flow down] the roof and eventually coalesce into bigger drops, just right for harvesting before they evaporate,” said the architects to ArchDaily . Stacking a concave roof atop a convex roof promotes natural cooling through shade and wind movement between the two roofs. Related: Rammed earth house blends traditional materials with modern techniques in Vietnam’s last frontier The bowl-shaped catchment area is steeply sloped to move raindrops towards a central collection point, where the rain is funneled into reservoirs . The reservoirs are placed between building walls to help regulate indoor temperatures. With this system, the architects estimate that 28 cubic meters of water could be harvested with just 923 square meters of a concave roof surface. BMDesign Studios’ vision also goes beyond the double-roof system and includes a massing design where the buildings and courtyards are sunken to promote natural cooling. The buildings would be organized around atriums to promote circulation and community. + BMDesign Studios Via ArchDaily Images via BMDesign Studios

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Bowl-shaped roofs harvest rainwater and promote natural cooling in arid environments

Bowl-shaped roofs harvest rainwater and promote natural cooling in arid environments

January 2, 2017 by  
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Water scarcity is felt unequally throughout the world with some regions worse off than others. Iran-based BMDesign Studios addressed their home country’s arid climates with an architectural solution to water shortages called Concave Roof, a double-roof system designed to collect and store rainwater, and promote natural cooling. The Concave Roof was engineered for arid environments, where rainwater collection can be tricky due to higher than average evaporation rates and low annual precipitation. The double-roof system, which includes a domed roof beneath a bowl-shaped catchment area, is designed to “help [make] even the smallest quantities of rain [flow down] the roof and eventually coalesce into bigger drops, just right for harvesting before they evaporate,” said the architects to ArchDaily . Stacking a concave roof atop a convex roof promotes natural cooling through shade and wind movement between the two roofs. Related: Rammed earth house blends traditional materials with modern techniques in Vietnam’s last frontier The bowl-shaped catchment area is steeply sloped to move raindrops towards a central collection point, where the rain is funneled into reservoirs . The reservoirs are placed between building walls to help regulate indoor temperatures. With this system, the architects estimate that 28 cubic meters of water could be harvested with just 923 square meters of a concave roof surface. BMDesign Studios’ vision also goes beyond the double-roof system and includes a massing design where the buildings and courtyards are sunken to promote natural cooling. The buildings would be organized around atriums to promote circulation and community. + BMDesign Studios Via ArchDaily Images via BMDesign Studios

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Bowl-shaped roofs harvest rainwater and promote natural cooling in arid environments

Pop-up art studios challenge the rising costs of Londons creative workforce

July 4, 2016 by  
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The Minima Moralia pop-up studio asks the question, “Will London still be the capital of creativity, arts and crafts in 10 years time?” The pair points out that soon only the independently wealthy will be able to afford the necessary means to be a productive member of the creative industry, as rental fees and training costs soar. Their studio could serve as a beginning to more affordable and accessible creative spaces. Related: The Observatory is a duo of charred-timber, off-grid art studios traveling around the UK Inspired by Theodor Adorno’s commentary on the “damaged lives” of London’s artists, the studio challenges its inhabitants to simplify their necessities in the tight quarters, yet also draw influence from the surroundings. Described as a type of “urban acupuncture,” the studios target and revive areas in the city most typically discarded or ignored. A modular steel frame is the starting point for the studio’s design, allowing a variety of different window, shelving, and desk configurations. A folding canopy completely opens up one side of the space, while a smaller vertical window gives an at-home feel to the artist inside. Bright sun or stars can filter in through an overhead skylight, furthering the connection to the space and inspiration outdoors. +Minima Moralia Via  Dezeen Images via Tomaso Boano and Jonas Prišmontas

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Pop-up art studios challenge the rising costs of Londons creative workforce

Luxurious tiny home lets owner live off-grid and rent-free

July 4, 2016 by  
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Created for client Marjolein Jonker, Walden Studio’s abode is the first tiny house to be legally placed with a temporary permit by a municipality in the Netherlands . Despite its small 17-square-meter footprint, the compact house creates the illusion of spaciousness with an open-plan layout and large glazed windows, two of which form the front door and blur the lines between indoor and outdoor living. Natural daylight spills into the home and reflects off the white-finished walls, cork floors, and birch plywood paneling. The largest area of the tiny home is the multifunctional seating area, just beyond the front doors, that includes a multipurpose, transforming piece of furniture that morphs from a couch with hidden storage space to a dining table that can seat four. The kitchen, desk, and stairs with storage are located in the center of the home, while the bathroom with a composting toilet and shower are tucked away in the rear. The bedroom and a closet are on the loft level. Related: Tiny Off-Grid Cabin in Maine is Completely Self-Sustaining “The house is inspired by the tiny house movement,” said the architects. “Living small generates more freedom; there is less junk in your house, you have to clean less and you don’t have to worry about a high mortgage since the average price is a fifth of a ‘normal’ house.” Thermally modified pine wood, spruce wood studs, and Ecoboard clad the tiny house and are bolstered by sheep wool insulation so that only a small wood stove is needed to heat the entire building. Rooftop solar panels power the off-grid home, while rainwater is harvested and wastewater is treated using a natural system. + Walden Studio Images via Walden Studio

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Luxurious tiny home lets owner live off-grid and rent-free

The Fangshan Tangshan National Geopark by HASSEL Studios celebrates the diversity of the Palaeozoic era

August 17, 2015 by  
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The Fangshan Tangshan National Geopark by HASSEL Studios celebrates the diversity of the Palaeozoic era

INFOGRAPHIC: The 7 best treehouses on Earth

January 19, 2015 by  
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Treehouses appeal to the child in all of us, but some of them go far above and beyond the simple structures of our youth. This infographic, brought to you by Heiton Buckley and NeoMam Studios , reveals the 7 best treehouses out there. From the trippy Mirrorcube in Sweden to the whimsical Free Spirit Spheres in Canada, these beautiful structures show just what you can accomplish with a little innovation, a child-like spirit and a really big tree. Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: The 7 best treehouses on Earth Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Bird-Apartment , free spirit spheres , House in the Oak , infographic , mirrorcube , NeoMam Studios , The Nook treehouse , The Pear Tree House , the UFO treehouse , treehouse designs , Treehouses , treehouses infographic

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INFOGRAPHIC: The 7 best treehouses on Earth

Innovative energy solutions bring light and warmth to a remote Thai village

January 19, 2015 by  
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Solar power and biogas solutions are helping residents of a remote Thai village to create their own grid . Those who live in Pa Deng in Kaeng Krachan, Phetchaburi, have homes that seem to have remained unchanged for hundreds of years: Far from any established power lines, the lifestyle here is very rustic, but a group is now helping to bring light, warmth, and power to the people here by installing solar panels and biogas balloons, and teaching residents how to use them. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of Innovative energy solutions bring light and warmth to a remote Thai village Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: balloons , biogas , biogas balloons , biogas cooking , compost gas , electric water pump , irrigation , Kaeng Krachan , methane , methane biogas , natural gas , Pa Deng , Pa Deng model , Phetchaburi , Progress Thailand , remote Thai village , remote village , rural village , solar panels , Solar Power , solar-powered water pump , Thai , Thai village , Thailand , villagers , water pump

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Innovative energy solutions bring light and warmth to a remote Thai village

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