Amazing Hive comes alive with sights and sounds in Washington, D.C.

July 13, 2017 by  
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Incredible sights and sounds have popped up at the National Building Museum in the heart of our nation’s capital. Thousands of giant paper tubes have been stacked together to construct soaring mountain-like structures in the Hive, an interactive sculpture created by Studio Gang Architects for the museum’s annual Summer Block Party. Read on to see the interior of the stunning installation and to hear the Hive come alive. Every year, the National Building Museum invites a different architecture firm to craft a large-scale, immersive installation for its Great Hall. Past projects included BIG’s concave Maze , Snarkitecture’s massive BEACH ball pit , and James Corner Field Operations’ cool ICEBERGS . Studio Gang Architects created the museum’s tallest installation yet that comprises 2,551 Sonotubes, wound paper tubes typically used to pour concrete. If laid end-to-end, the recyclable tubes would measure over a mile in length and have a combined weight of 72,961 pounds. A giant Hive has popped up in D.C.! Explore the National Building Museum's summer installation by Studio Gang Architects. It's made with #recyclable materials, interactive, and absolutely massive. #hivedc @nationalbuildingmuseum @studiogang #architecture #dc #washingtondc #ecofriendly ?: @landscapevoice A post shared by Inhabitat (@inhabitatdesign) on Jul 11, 2017 at 9:10am PDT To complement the National Building Museum’s neoclassical Great Hall, Studio Gang Architects used a silver shade for the tube exterior. The tube interior and the Hive floor were painted magenta, a color inspired by the pink used in the Women’s March in Washington, D.C. last January. Ninety different tube sizes were used to construct the three interconnected chambers and allow filtered light into the spaces to create beautiful patterns of light and shadow that change throughout the day. Related: ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C. “We’ve also incorporated a lot of sound elements in here,” Emma Filar, NBM’s Interim Director of Marketing & Communications told Inhabitat. “Jeanne Gang, the founding principal of Studio Gang, is really interested in the way that people move through spaces and how they interact with space here, so that’s why we have instruments inside. Sound travels in a really interesting way through these paper tubes; they both absorb sound and reflect it in different ways.” Visitors at the Hive are free to play with the installation’s many instruments, which range from hanging wind chimes constructed from a variety of materials including wrenches, CDs, and metal pipes. Some paper tubes are used as drums, while others are combined with other common building materials like pipes to create more complicated instruments. Round openings at the top of each chamber allow natural light into the chambers and frame views of the Great Hall’s ceilings and columns. The Hive also has a hands-on building area, where people can play with paper diskettes to build their own structures. The National Building Museum will host a full slate of programs that complement the installation, from concerts to late-night events with food. The Hive is open to the public July 6 through September 4, 2017. + Studio Gang Watermarked photos © Lucy Wang , non-watermarked photos © Tim Schenck

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Amazing Hive comes alive with sights and sounds in Washington, D.C.

Elegant bamboo bridge adds unexpected beauty to ancient Chinese town

April 21, 2017 by  
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Most bridges are boring pieces of infrastructure, but Chinese design firm Mimesis Architecture Studio breaks the mold with a hybrid bamboo bridge that adds sculptural beauty to China’s Jiangsu Province. Spanning Lake Taihu in Dingshu Town, the 100-meter-long Wuxi Harbor Bridge is a visual delight with its latticed bamboo structures that frame the road and reference the region’s ancient cultural heritage. Primarily known as the “China Clay Capital” for the rare purple clay found in the nearby mountains, Dingshu Town is also well known for its bamboo craftsmanship. The architects celebrate the bamboo craft with the design of the bridge, which was constructed with help from the local bamboo craftspeople. Built with a curved steel structure, the bridge is framed by large triangular frames made of latticed bamboo poles that were carbonized to improve durability. Related: Amazing transparent bridge seems to disappear into thin air in China’s “Avatar” mountains The geometric bamboo “nets” are lightweight and can be removed and easily replaced if damaged. The bamboo was also used as formwork for concrete , imparting a distinct texture to the deck handrails. “Based on the existing bridge structure, the deck and fence parts are designed,” wrote the architects. “The intertwining images of mountain, river, fog and wind fabricating the site are projected onto the form of the bridge.” + Mimesis Architecture Studio Via Dezeen Images by Jian Jiao, Xing Zheng, Shiliang Hu

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Elegant bamboo bridge adds unexpected beauty to ancient Chinese town

Apples stunning spaceship campus revealed in new drone footage

April 21, 2017 by  
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Apple’s beautiful new campus nears completion and employees are set to move in this month. Videographer Duncan Sinfield’s got the latest visual scoop on the tech giant’s “spaceship” campus—officially named Apple Park—with his stunning drone footage of ongoing construction and a special nighttime close-up of the building interior. Hit the jump for the newest sneak peek into Apple’s futuristic campus. Drone pilot Sinfield has consistently provided the public with monthly visual updates of Apple’s 175-acre park in Cupertino since July 2015. Nearly two years later, his latest drone footage shows the campus transformed with the hilly landscape slowly filling in with trees, although turf has yet to be installed. Once complete, the site’s rolling hills will be covered with grassy fields, jogging paths, and over 9,000 native and drought-resistant trees. Designed in collaboration with Foster + Partners , Apple Park prides itself on energy efficiency and will be powered entirely by 100-percent renewable energy. Rooftop solar amounts to 17 megawatts in one of the world’s largest on-site solar energy installations. The 2.9-million-square foot main ring-shaped building will be clad in the world’s largest panels of curved glass. The building is also projected to be one of the world’s largest naturally ventilated structures, requiring no heating or air conditioning for nine months of the year. Related: Apple’s $5 billion spaceship campus to open in April as “Apple Park” The new 4K drone footage shows a nighttime peek of the interior, where construction workers are working around the clock to prep the campus for occupancy. The process of moving over 12,000 employees into the campus will begin this month and is expected to take over six months while construction continues through the summer. Apple Park will also feature a visitor’s center with an Apple Store and cafe open to the public. Screenshots via Duncan Sinfield

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Apples stunning spaceship campus revealed in new drone footage

Why Sealed Air is tackling food waste for the climate?

January 18, 2017 by  
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Ron Cotterman, Vice President or Sustainability at Sealed Air, joined GreenBiz Studio at GreenBiz 16.

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Why Sealed Air is tackling food waste for the climate?

Why Sealed Air is tackling food waste for the climate?

January 18, 2017 by  
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Ron Cotterman, Vice President or Sustainability at Sealed Air, joined GreenBiz Studio at GreenBiz 16.

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Why Sealed Air is tackling food waste for the climate?

Screens made out of raw concrete pipes provide privacy for this chic modern home

January 10, 2017 by  
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Cyprus-based architects Varda Studio are proving that industrial chic can be sustainable . The designers have just unveiled an amazing home complete with an exterior made out of hundreds of stacked concrete tube pipes . The AB Residence uses the massive concrete wall to provide privacy as well as diffuse natural light and ventilation to the elongated home, which also features a wraparound veranda and water corridor. The 190-square-meter home is comprised of a load-bearing metal structure, topped with a corrugated metal sheet. On the interior, exposed beams and columns complement the concrete pipe tubes which envelope the interior base. The pipes are purposely visible from the interior, but are separated from the living space by a wooden exterior walkway that doubles as an outdoor sitting deck. The interior space is a linear layout that has living area, dining area and sitting area making up one side of the home. Three bedrooms and an office are located further along a hallway that runs the length of the house. Related: Totally Tubular TubeHotel In Mexico Offers Up Accommodations In Recycled Concrete Pipes Large glass doors slide open on a single 76-meter continuous track onto the wooden veranda that runs north to south, integrating the exterior into the interior. Intimate garden pockets and a water corridor further brings the surrounding nature into the man-made design. Although the home certainly emits an industrial chic vibe, there is a method to its madness. More than just a whimsical focal point of the home’s aesthetic, the concrete tubes actually provide a sturdy barrier from the strong winds that are common in the area. They also pull double duty as a privacy feature, simultaneously hiding the interior from the outside while diffusing natural light and air circulation throughout the interior. The interior design actually benefits from the openness thanks to the strategic Envelope 3D system. For temperature control, the design implements a number of passive strategies, making use of passive solar gains in the witner and using an awning installed above the glass windows and doors to provide shade in the hot summer months. As part of the strategic insulative system , the walls contain polystryrene and fiberglass thermal insulation, which reduces the need for artificial temperature control. + Varda Studio Via Archdaily Photographs by Creative Photo Room

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Screens made out of raw concrete pipes provide privacy for this chic modern home

Corals at Keppel Bay combine the best of luxury and sustainability

November 17, 2016 by  
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The project features buildings clad in glazed, white aluminum and glass panels , which create a rhythm accentuated by ribbons of balconies. It comprises 366 apartments that range from one-to-four bedrooms and penthouses, with sizes ranging from 538 square feet to 8,503 square feet. The residents will have exclusive access to Marina at Keppel Bay on Keppel Island which includes a clubhouse with members’ lounge, fine dining establishments and yacht charter services. Related: Daniel Libeskind’s ambitious design for The Kurdistan Museum in Iraq To help foster biodiversity, harvested “donor” coral fragments are grown in a nursery, after which they are transplanted to King’s Dock, near the residences. To further sustainability, reflecting pools run the length of each building. These pools serve to help cool the residences. The site also features a green roof, rainwater collection and solar panels. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFwTiG9_XOI “Just like a coral reef , the composition of each cluster of buildings is unique—the common thread is spectacular bay views and expansive balconies throughout,” said Daniel Libeskind. “I sought to imbue the entire site with openness and greenery—the true core of this project is sustainable living,” he added. + Studio Libeskind

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Corals at Keppel Bay combine the best of luxury and sustainability

How does a city like Los Angeles buy tech?

November 9, 2016 by  
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Mark Anthony Thomas, Director of the Mayor’s Operations Innovation Team for the City of Los Angeles (or the “O-Team”) sat down with GreenBiz Studio at VERGE 16. 

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How does a city like Los Angeles buy tech?

Studio Fuksas completes the largest project built in Rome in over 50 years

October 24, 2016 by  
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The project is built in Rome’s historic quarter EUR and boasts 55,000 square meters (13 acres) of mixed-use spaces, including a hotel. It is defined by three elements: “Theca”, the “Cloud” and the “blade” of the hotel . The “Theca” is the outer layer that comprises a steel structure and double-glass facade and encases the “Cloud” which acts as the heart of the project. The”Cloud” accommodates a large auditorium with 1760 seats, snack points and support services. It looks like an undulating cloud covered by a 15,000-square-meter transparent curtain and acts as an independent structure within the interior of the building. Related: Studio Fuksas Completes Spectacular Terminal With Honeycomb Skylights at Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport The New Congress Center can host various events and has a capacity that can reach a total of nearly 9,000 seats, including the 1,760 seats inside the “Cloud”. The entire complex has a climate control system with variable flow air conditioning and photovoltaics that provide clean energy and mitigate solar radiation. + Studio Fuksas

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Studio Fuksas completes the largest project built in Rome in over 50 years

Romantic Treehouse huts are tucked away in Beijings tranquil mountains

October 6, 2016 by  
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Wee Studio’s Treehouse structures aren’t treehouses in the strict sense of the word—the timber huts are elevated, but not onto a tree. The name is likely inspired by its placement inside the grove of five poplar trees and two hawthorn trees. The 8-square-meter prefabricated buildings were built with a steel frame and comprise two polyhedrons connected by a deck. The larger of the two huts houses a tearoom with tatami flooring and overlooks the adjacent stream through large floor-to-ceiling glazing on the north side. A skylight frames views of the sky and trees and helps make the interior feel larger than its small footprint lets on. The second hut contains the bathroom. The structures are elevated off the ground to minimize site impact and to give the Treehouse the illusion of floating among the trees. The buildings are wrapped in a thermal insulating layer and are heated in winter. Related: Dramatic Dartmoor Treehouse is Woven From Wood Like a Bird’s Nest “The building of Treehouse is a practice of Wee Studio about the subtle relationship between nature and inhabitation, as well as an exploration about how to achieve the architecture in the era of internet now,” write the architects. “At the end of 2015, we initiated a crowdfunding on the Internet which had a great response in a short time. More than just about building a Treehouse on our own, the practice is more about inviting more people with same interests into the process of design and construction and having fun with it. The Treehouse is a space where you can communicate with mountain, trees, the sky and stream.” + Wee Studio Via ArchDaily Images via Wee Studio , © Sun Haiting – RoadsideAlien Studio

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Romantic Treehouse huts are tucked away in Beijings tranquil mountains

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