Students around the world join climate strike on March 15

March 13, 2019 by  
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On Friday, March 15, tens of thousands of high school and middle school students in more than 70 countries plan to walk out of their classrooms and protest at town and city halls. Young people are uniting around the world in a coordinated demand for their leaders to take radical action to curb greenhouse gas emissions and slow down the impacts of climate change. How did the climate strikes start? The international youth climate strike movement began in August 2018 when 16-year-old environmental activist, Greta Thunberg skipped school to protest outside the Swedish Parliament. Since August, her actions caused a ripple effect throughout the world and snowballed the movement to include teens throughout the world. Related: 8 women leading the change for a better world Since Thunberg’s protest, students have similarly skipped out on school to hold up “Youth Climate Strike” and “School Strike for Climate” signs outside government buildings in the U.K., U.S., Japan, Uganda, Germany, Thailand, Switzerland and France, among others . Frustrated by inaction— or insufficient action— from politicians throughout their young lives, these students are panicked about the scientific predictions for the future and unwavering in their call for change. In New York, for example, 13-year-old Alexandria Villasenor has forgone her classes for the past twelve consecutive Fridays in order to sit outside the U.N. headquarters and protest. On Friday, March 15, thousands of others will join what the young people have virally hashtagged as #FridaysForFuture . Find a Climate Strike near you To date, there will be over 700 strikes in 71 countries, however the number continues to grow as rallies are added to the map. Check out this world-wide map  to see the incredible number of strikes across the globe. This U.S. climate strike map  is tracking all of the registered climate strikes in the U.S. Students are rallying around the hashtags #FridaysforFuture and #YouthClimateStrike , in honor of Thunberg and other student activists who have skipped school to protest for climate action in the past months. The strikes are supported by outspoken environmental groups such as the Sunrise Movement and Extinction Rebellion. Climate Strike leaders are calling on students to walk out of their classes on Friday, March 15, to protest outside of the nearest town or city hall, and of course post a photo on social media. Not all students get a free pass Many of the U.S. climate strikes will take place at local House or Senate representatives’ offices where the youth plans to push for acceptance of the Green New Deal, a radical environmental proposal championed by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY). Similar protests have already met with dismay by representatives such as Nancy Pelosi and Diane Feinstein, both Democrats from California, who feel the students are naively confident in the Green New Deal without understanding the complexities of politics and party relations. Related: Rep. Ocasio Cortez releases green new deal In the U.K., the Prime Minister condemned the climate strike as wasteful of teachers’ time. In Australia, despite support for the protests by labor unions, the Minister of Education announced that all students and teachers who leave school on Friday will be punished— to which Greta Thunberg quickly tweeted back “we don’t care.” Isra Hirsi, daughter of freshman Representative, Ilhan Omar (D-MN), is one of the young leaders of the behind U.S. climate strikes, but she also expressed concern about the movement’s lack of intersectionality– in other words its lack of recognition and inclusion of climate leaders from many different, overlapping and often disadvantaged, demographic groups. Early this week, Hirsi tweeted about the importance of recognizing that indigenous leaders, not young white students, have been leading climate activism long before these hashtags. What are the students asking for? The strikes are largely a response to a UN Framework Convention on Climate Change report, which indicates that the world has less than 12 years to implement radical change or the impacts of global warming will be devastating and irreversible. Mark Hertsgaard from The Nation wrote of the students: “They grasp what many of their elders apparently never learned: The climate struggle is not about having the best science, the smartest arguments, or the most bipartisan talking points. It is about power — specifically, the power that ExxonMobil and the rest of the fossil-fuel industry wield over governments and economies the world over, and their willingness to use that power to enforce a business model guaranteed to fry the planet.” While students around the world have different demands from their respective leaders, they are united in their call for swift and decisive action to curtail carbon emissions and for politicians to adopt firm environmental platforms. Such platforms, though, might look drastically different in each country. Columnist for The Guardian , George Monbiot, argued that the students must develop and articulate a clear position, or else he fears they will be divided, co-opted or worse– ineffective at ultimately influencing the actual legislation that will save their futures. Via The Nation Images via Mike Baumeister , niekverlaan

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Students around the world join climate strike on March 15

This Brazilian beach house is made from locally-sourced natural materials

March 13, 2019 by  
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The architects at MNMA Studio have created a natural beachy oasis made of eco-friendly elements in the region of Pontal do Cupe, Pernambuco of northeastern Brazil. Head architects Andre Pepato and Mariana Schmidt used natural materials such as eucalyptus, certified wood, calcium carbonate rocks and even twigs to complement the concrete structure. The people of the Pontal do Cupe region have limited access to building materials and methods, so the beach house helps to symbolize an innovative and rewarding new period of architecture for the area. The building site is located on an old coconut farm, and construction was completely primarily by workers from the surrounding communities. Not only did the architects use environmentally-friendly materials for building, but they also gave the local area an opportunity to learn about sustainable building since some of the project workers (a portion of which came from families of fishermen) had never used cement or concrete before. Related: Minimalist tiny cabin is a secluded retreat in a Brazilian forest It’s clear that the entire project revolved around choosing eco-friendly materials that would reduce the need for environmental energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. For example, a portion of the structure was designed in certified eucalyptus wood. Perhaps one of the most unique and striking portions of the home is the ceiling, which is made from reused twigs and brings a particular brightness into the interior. The furniture and interior decoration are by Sergio Rodrigues and Cariri Fair. The designers used whitewash to add pigment to the concrete, a natural painting process using a non-toxic solution of calcium carbonate rocks, slaked lime and water . The whitewash on the walls and stairs make an eco-friendly statement and fight humidity while adding a textured bright-white color to the open-aired interior and exterior. As a result, the entire beach house is presented with beautiful natural colors. A dark mustard-colored concrete slab serves as a base for the home and contrasts nicely with the light brown wooden columns that help to hold up the roof terrace. The roof patio was fitted with lovely stone slab flooring of faded natural colors and opens up with an unobstructed ocean view. Via Archdaily Images by Andre Klotz 

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This Brazilian beach house is made from locally-sourced natural materials

An old school bus is upcycled into an open-air theater in India

July 27, 2018 by  
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When Doaba Public School in Punjab, India decided to retire a 20-year-old school bus , it was reluctant to part ways with the vehicle. The bus had belonged to the school’s first fleet of school buses — now increased to a fleet of more than 50 vehicles — so, the administrators tapped Indian design practice Studio Ardete to reuse the decommissioned bus. The resulting design, called the Bavillion, is a geometric pavilion that’s integrated into the school and offers a play area, an open-air theater and a gallery space. The 323-square-foot Bavillion serves the Doaba Public School located in the remote Punjabi village of Parowal. More than 2,500 students from over 100 villages travel — primarily on buses — to the school. Knowing how important buses are to the school, Studio Ardete was careful to keep the vehicle shape intact (including the steering wheel and driver’s seat) while gutting the interior to make way for a new gallery space lined with multi-faceted panels for texture. The pavilion structure was built on the outside of the bus as a “triangular prismatic volume,” and a deck was installed atop the roof of the bus. The upcycled “Bus-Building” was also developed to teach the students and community about the circular economy and the benefits of recycling. The pavilion functions as a congregation space with bleacher seating for students and teachers, while the interior gallery offers insight and documentation on the school’s history over the past four decades. Related: Old Greyhound bus converted into gorgeous tiny house on wheels “The bond shared by the school bus and the school has thus found a new meaning,” Studio Ardete said in a project statement. “After serving more than 8,000 school trips and taking on the responsibility of a million student’s transfers, it finally rests as an integral part of the school. A play area, an open air theater, a gallery and above all a symbol that inculcates the importance of reuse and upcycling in the students so their vision for tomorrow can be driven toward a sustainable future.” + Studio Ardete Images via Ar.Purnesh Dev Nikhanj

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An old school bus is upcycled into an open-air theater in India

Whoopi Goldberg’s cannabis line grows sustainably

January 20, 2017 by  
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The following Q&A is an edited excerpt from the Bard MBA’s Sustainable Business Fridays podcast. Sustainable Business Fridays brings together students in Bard’s MBA in Sustainability program with leaders in business, sustainability and social entrepreneurship.

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Whoopi Goldberg’s cannabis line grows sustainably

Unexpected living room with Soviet-era furniture pops up in a Lithuanian lagoon

September 9, 2016 by  
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The Living Boom offers an unexpected and quiet respite in Nida, the bustling popular resort town in Lithuania. A team of 18 international architecture students completed the project within a span of two weeks. The public space is partially hidden behind a five-meter-tall wooden wall so that visitors must physically walk onto the pier to see the entirety of The Living Boom. The wall, fixed to a concrete floor with metal bolts, serves as the symbolic threshold between the “interior” living room and “outdoor” nature. “A pier is a dead end. How can one change the ‘end of this long path’ and celebrate its end as a new space?” Write the designers. “Being already set into boundaries on three sides by the element of water, the start of the project was to construct a fourth wall that creates a new space. As one walks along the pier, approaching the wall in the middle of the plain landscapes of lagoon and sand dunes , one yet has to find out what the space behind the wall offers. Only after physically walking through, one can see and grasp the new space, with furniture shining in red, generating an unseen space in the middle of water, sky, sand dunes and forest.” Related: This timber installation challenges students to think about new ways to design homes The Living Boom is outfitted with local Soviet-era furniture modified with modern elements by the students and includes a three-meter-long table, multiple benches, a traditional wind vane, a giant wooden chair, and even a fireplace. All parts of the installation were painted the same shade of red. + The Living Boom Images by Alexandra Kononchenko and Miguel Angel Maure Blesa

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Unexpected living room with Soviet-era furniture pops up in a Lithuanian lagoon

This hooded coat can be turned into a shelter for Syrian refugees

February 1, 2016 by  
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A group of students from London’s Royal College of Art  wanted to help make a difference in the Syrian crisis, so they created these ingenious hooded jackets that can be turned into sleeping bags or tents large enough to house an adult and a child. But in order to bring the idea to reality, the students are looking for help. You can make a difference in the lives of those who are suffering. Read on to find out how. READ MORE >

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This hooded coat can be turned into a shelter for Syrian refugees

Artist retreat north of the Arctic Circle clad in “pickled” wood for durability

February 1, 2016 by  
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LEO A DALY created a green-roof underground passage for the students of Minnesota State

March 10, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of LEO A DALY created a green-roof underground passage for the students of Minnesota State Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: green architecture , green roof , green-roofed architecture , LEO A DALY , LEO A DALY Minnesota U , Minnesota , Minnesota University , outdoor amphitheater , pedestrian link , sheltered passage , steel architecture , tunnel , underground architecture , underground pedestrian tunnel , underground tunnel

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LEO A DALY created a green-roof underground passage for the students of Minnesota State

Curvaceous lines and a large skylight give an ethereal vibe to this modern teashop in Prague

March 10, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Curvaceous lines and a large skylight give an ethereal vibe to this modern teashop in Prague Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: birch veneer , czech republic , medium-density firewood , micro topping , minimalist design , modern , plywood , Prague , skylight , squeegee-grade micro topping , Studio pha , T Lounge , tea shop , tea store

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Curvaceous lines and a large skylight give an ethereal vibe to this modern teashop in Prague

Architecture students create 3D printing robots that can build just about anywhere

January 26, 2015 by  
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A team of students at California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco has developed autonomous, mobile 3D printing robots that could some day be put to work building in outlying areas. The Swarmscapers, as the small robots are called, are capable of traversing difficult terrain and they work with found materials to build shapes and structures. Some day, these little robots could be used to construct entire buildings. Read the rest of Architecture students create 3D printing robots that can build just about anywhere Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3-D Printing , 3D , 3D printing , Architecture , arduino , BUILD , building , California , California College of the Arts , construction , engineering , green materials , instructables , robotics , robots , San Francisco , students

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Architecture students create 3D printing robots that can build just about anywhere

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