Tallhouse: an adaptable, timber model for low-carbon urban housing

December 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Tallhouse: an adaptable, timber model for low-carbon urban housing

In an effort to bring down carbon emissions and streamline the building of cost-effective urban housing , Boston-based AEC technology company Generate is focused on revolutionizing the city’s construction industry. Generate has created The Tallhouse, a template for adaptable, low-carbon housing that prioritizes the structural use of mass timber. It’s no secret that buildings account for a massive portion of greenhouse gas emissions through embodied and operational energy. That, paired with rapid population growth and urban densification, presents a problem for future sustainability goals for Boston . The city is experiencing pressure from housing shortages and carbon-output, which has inspired goals of building 300,000 housing units and 40,0000,000 square feet of commercial buildings while reducing the city’s carbon footprint by 80% in 2050. If the status quo of carbon-emitting structures is maintained at its current level, according to the company, these goals will remain unattainable. Related: World’s tallest hybrid timber building proposed for Sydney For these reasons, Generate has assembled a group of industry leaders to develop The Tallhouse, which will comprise a catalog of four mass timber structure templates that illustrate a range of design options that are quick, sustainable, cost-effective and high-quality. The team identified carbon emission savings from building materials and construction, displaying information on each building component to help increase transparency on the environmental implications of construction. “Already, we are designing individual mass timber projects relying on these digital systems, which are now starting to go up in Boston,” said John Klein, CEO of Generate. “But the Tallhouse catalog was developed with the specific intent of at once enabling our cities to achieve their ambitious CO2 footprint reduction goals, and to meet growing demand for affordable, biophilic housing. We trust these systems will be widely accessible to architectural communities globally, and serve as a vehicle to deploy sustainable materials at scale.” The Tallhouse catalog is meant to inspire sustainable systems but also aid policy makers in decisions regarding eco-friendly building materials. The building templates include a hybrid steel and cross-laminated timber structure; a mass timber post, beam and plate structure; a hybrid light-gauge metal and cross-laminated timber structure; and a full and cross-laminated timber plate honeycomb structure. Systems are designed for anywhere from eight- to 18-story buildings. In addition to the sustainable framework, the structures include low-flow water fixtures, LED lighting and large windows to let in daylight. + Generate Images via Generate

Excerpt from:
Tallhouse: an adaptable, timber model for low-carbon urban housing

Inspiring mud-and-bamboo Anandaloy Building uplifts a Bangladeshi community

November 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Inspiring mud-and-bamboo Anandaloy Building uplifts a Bangladeshi community

German architecture practice Studio Anna Heringer has received the international architecture prize OBEL AWARD 2020 for its work on the Anandaloy Building, an unconventional project combining sustainable construction and social development to catalyze local development in rural Bangladesh. Created to follow the practice’s motto that “architecture is a tool to improve lives,” the curved building was built by local villagers using locally sourced mud and bamboo and serves as both a community center for people with disabilities and a small workspace for producing fair textiles. The project’s name Anandaloy means ‘The Place of Deep Joy’ in the local Bengali dialect. Located in the northern Bangladeshi village of Rudrapur, the multifunctional community center was designed to celebrate diversity and inclusion — concepts that are particularly important for those with disabilities in Bangladesh, where having a disability is sometimes regarded as karmic punishment. The building also helps empower local women and counteract urban-rural migration with the clothes-making project Dipdii Textiles located on the first floor. The project supports local textile traditions with work opportunities. Related: Architects recycle shipping containers into a breezy Dhaka home “What I want to transmit with this building is that there is a lot of beauty in not following the typical standard pattern,” Anna Heringer said. “Anandaloy does not follow a simple rectangular layout. Rather, the building is dancing, and dancing with it is the ramp that follows it around. That ramp is essential, because it is the symbol of inclusion. It is the only ramp in the area, and as the most predominant thing about the building, it triggers a lot of questions. In that way, the architecture itself raises awareness of the importance of including everyone. Diversity is something beautiful and something to celebrate.” Local villagers of all ages and genders, including people with disabilities, built Anandaloy with a no-formwork mud construction technique called cob. Bamboo purchased from local farmers was also used for the structural components and the facade, which features a Vienna weaving pattern that the workers selected. The building completely runs on solar energy.  + Studio Anna Heringer Photography by Kurt Hoerbst via Studio Anna Heringer

Original post:
Inspiring mud-and-bamboo Anandaloy Building uplifts a Bangladeshi community

ESW Beauty makes eco-friendly sheet masks your skin will love

November 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on ESW Beauty makes eco-friendly sheet masks your skin will love

Eco-conscious skincare connoisseurs often face a dilemma. We know single-use products cause unnecessary waste, yet the sheet mask craze shows no sign of stopping. It’s easy to see why sheet masks remain popular; when you can simply rip open a package, slap on a mess-free sheet mask and go about your day, it’s hard to go back to multi-step wash-off or peel-off masks. Still, few people would argue that the convenience and skincare benefits of sheet masks outweigh the environmental harm and extra waste these products create. Offering a solution to this puzzling problem, ESW Beauty ‘s Raw Juice Cleanse Sheet Masks will help your skin without harming the environment. What is ESW Beauty? Started by Elina Sofia Wang, ESW Beauty began as part of Wang’s search for a cleaner lifestyle. While struggling with health issues, Wang started drinking raw juices and exploring clean beauty options. Unable to find sheet masks that suited her needs, the ESW Beauty founder decided to make her own. By combining a non-toxic, cruelty-free and eco-friendly formula with Wang’s love for raw juices, the Raw Juice Cleanse Sheet Masks were born. What goes into an eco-friendly sheet mask? As the ESW Beauty website so eloquently states, “Our mission is to develop beauty products made with clean, ethically-sourced, and sustainable ingredients . We firmly believe product formulation and ingredients should be held to a higher standard.” What does this mean for ESW’s sheet masks? First, it guarantees that each mask’s formula prioritizes clean ingredients. That means no parabens, phthalates, synthetic fragrances or dyes, formaldehydes, alcohol, silicones or animal-derived ingredients. No animal-derived ingredients ensures that these sheet masks, both the serum and fabric, are fully vegan . As a company of animal lovers, ESW Beauty also keeps its products cruelty-free, pledging to never test on animals. This dedication to vegan and cruelty-free formulas earned ESW certifications from both Leaping Bunny and PETA. But what about the waste issue with sheet masks? To minimize single-use sheet masks’ environmental impact, ESW takes a two-fold approach. Starting with the packaging, ESW’s mask pouches use recyclable low-density polyethylene (LDPE), a material that, while plastic, has been found by a Danish Environmental Protection Agency study to produce the smallest environmental impact among alternatives such as paper , bioplastic and cotton. Once you open the pouch, the mask itself uses a material called cupra (also known as cupro), a sustainable and biodegradable fabric made from cotton linter, which is usually discarded as waste during cotton processing. Reviewing the sheet masks Packaged in an inviting white and blue box, a free editorial sample of ESW Beauty’s Masking & Juicing Essentials Set arrived at my door for review. After unboxing, I surveyed the exciting products inside. The eco-friendly beauty and skincare field isn’t typically known for eye-catching aesthetics, but ESW’s clever designs eschew the industry-standard brown and green color scheme in favor of something more fun. The colorful, bottle-shaped mask pouches not only fit with the raw juice theme but are also a delightful addition to my bathroom counter. Masks aren’t the only treats this kit has in store. In addition to a box of all five sheet masks in the Raw Juice Cleanse line, the full Masking & Juicing Essentials Set includes a clear tote bag, canvas sheet mask travel pouch, clear glass bottle and sprout headband. Right now, ESW Beauty is also including free stickers with every order. While the clear tote, canvas pouch and glass bottle are all cute and handy parts of the set, I was most excited for the sheet masks (obviously) and sprout headband. Before trying out the masks, I slipped on the soft sprout headband to keep my hair out of my face. The headband’s soft material might cause it to slip down your head if you have fine-textured hair, but for me, it did a good job of staying in place. Upon first trying out one of the masks (the delicious-sounding Strawberries & Cream Soothing Raw Juice Mask ), I was pleased to find that it included plenty of serum. No dry masks here! The soft mask material is a great vessel for the serum and contoured well to my face for the entire 20-minute application time. As the weather turns colder and starts drying out and irritating my skin, this mask and The Pink Dream Moisturizing Raw Juice Mask were my favorites for helping my skin recover and look healthy again. But what if your skin needs some extra, targeted attention? If you need a rejuvenating boost, the Pineapple Bliss Revitalizing Raw Juice Mask can help get your skin glowing again. I also enjoyed the Deep Detox Pore Control Raw Juice Mask ‘s slight tingle; I could feel the mask working and appreciated how smooth my skin felt afterward. As a baby-faced 23-year-old, I didn’t expect to see major results from the Green Reset Anti-Aging Raw Juice Mask , but I did notice a slight improvement in the fine lines on my forehead after use. Whether you want something need-specific or simply a luxurious, eco-friendly moisture boost, ESW Raw Juice Face Masks are a choice that your skin and the environment will thank you for. + ESW Beauty Images by Grae Gleason / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by ESW Beauty. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

The rest is here: 
ESW Beauty makes eco-friendly sheet masks your skin will love

5 ways businesses can take action to reduce environmental racism

November 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on 5 ways businesses can take action to reduce environmental racism

5 ways businesses can take action to reduce environmental racism Samantha Harris Mon, 11/16/2020 – 00:20 For decades, Black, indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) in the United States have sought environmental justice as a civil right, but now, the grave disparities in environmental harms are coming into national prominence . This year’s COVID-19 crisis and racial justice movement have highlighted the systemic inequities in the U.S. and revealed how crises disproportionately affect certain populations. The urgency of now is underscored by the climate crisis and the need for climate justice.  Businesses continue to lead on climate in the absence of U.S. political will. And while we have a long way to go, businesses are also stepping up in the fight for racial equity  — some leading the pack, such as Starbucks , and beginning to integrate equitable strategies across their business, particularly in their climate solutions. Whether we say climate justice, climate equity, the intersection of climate change and people or the social impacts of climate change, one thing is clear: Business has a role to play in addressing the structural inequity that causes low-income populations and communities of color to bear the brunt of the climate crisis.  Extreme heat and storms, sea level rise, intense wildfires — climate change may threaten everyone, but many BIPOC communities are more vulnerable to climate impacts. These communities also suffer disproportionately from the broader socioeconomic impacts of climate change, such as disrupted access to social services and increased energy costs — so much so that race is the most salient indicator in the U.S. of how the climate crisis affects people. This includes poor air quality due to proximity to polluting facilities such as fossil fuel power plants and refineries, which compounds the impacts of crises such as COVID-19.  The business role in climate justice  Business has an important role to play in helping to bring climate justice and racial equity front and center while shifting the finance for the energy transition. Business action, supported by government regulations, investments and incentives, is absolutely critical for transitioning to net-zero emissions by 2050. Achieving this not only addresses the climate crisis writ large, but it also improves local environments and economies to be more sustainable for everyone.  The move to a net-zero GHG emissions economy will require systemic transitions in business operations; however, the benefits of this shift are immense both for business and for broader society. Billions of dollars will be spent, saved and made during this transition. A fair, just and inclusive transition with justice at its core calls for climate investments to alleviate or eliminate existing disparities in environmental, social and economic opportunities and outcomes. Billions of dollars will be spent, saved and made during this transition. Traditionally, climate action has focused too narrowly on only the global benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, ignoring the potential to generate immediate benefits for community well-being, such as “improving local air quality and economies through investments in infrastructure, restoring ecosystems and increasing community vitality .”  Stakeholders, people, matter to business — whether through direct employment, raw material production in value chains, or markets. The barriers that prevent BIPOC communities from thriving also hinder business growth and sustainability. No longer can businesses ignore entrenched social inequality — greater inequality leads to greater environmental degradation. This phenomenon, also known as intersectional environmentalism , means that instead of one bottom line, there are three: environment; economy; and equity. Businesses can and should design all activities, especially those that address the climate crisis, with a racial equity and justice lens. As we transition, we must bring BIPOC communities along with us; otherwise, there’s a risk that they’ll continue to be left out, even in the new structure we create. What business can do about climate justice While many businesses are stepping up by setting the necessary ambitious climate targets in line with the Paris Agreement, it simply isn’t enough to protect those most affected by the climate crisis. The good news is, businesses can do many things to promote climate justice activities, including learning from what others already have done. For example, learning from the cities of Portland, Oregon and Oakland, California, businesses can take steps to place social justice at the center of their core activities, including those related to climate, within their own operations; enable others to do the same; and influence policies to reduce systemic inequities at their roots. Portland’s 2015 Climate Action Plan and Oakland’s 2030 Equitable Climate Action Plan (ECAP) center climate solutions that address existing disparities, transitioning away from fossil fuel dependence while increasing community resilience. A companion document to Oakland’s ECAP, the Racial Equity Impact Assessment & Implementation Guide (REIA) , describes how to identify the most affected communities and reduce equity gaps in resource allocation and climate vulnerability.  Here are more ways in which businesses can lead:  Center climate justice and racial equity in climate activities Commit to a net-zero GHG reduction target by 2050, or sooner, across the entire value chain. Identify the business activities that disproportionately affect communities on the basis of race, and develop solutions centered in climate justice and racial equity. This can include reducing harmful on-site emissions as well as off-site fleet electrification in high pollution areas. Identify the business activities that disproportionately affect communities on the basis of race, and develop solutions centered in climate justice and racial equity. Companies also can develop green jobs in a just manner that respects human rights and livelihoods. Resilience solutions should also ensure that those across the company operations and value chains (employees, factory workers, smallholder farmers, vital communities) are protected from climate-related events.  Engage those most affected by the climate crisis Assess your business’ climate impact and compile data showing the impacts on the communities and stakeholders most affected by the structural inequalities (climate risk and vulnerability assessments). Engage them in community-driven climate resilience planning. For example, businesses can diversify the value chain to support small disadvantaged business enterprises (DBEs) with sustainable practices and enter Community Benefits Agreements with residents living near business facilities to increase climate benefits such as urban tree cover, home weatherization and electric vehicle (EV) access. Educate and build awareness about climate justice Educate leadership and employees internally on how race intersects with the climate crisis. Build awareness externally and help educate others on the issue. Earlier this year, the B Corp Climate Collective launched its Climate Justice Learning Task Force , intended to help others access resources about climate justice. Collaborate to scale impact Solving the climate crisis is too big to only act alone — companies should collaborate with others across industries and with expert stakeholders. For example, companies can commit to the Business Pledge for Just Transition and Decent Green Jobs . And Starbucks is collaborating with partners to identify areas across their business to incorporate climate justice, including how they procure renewable energy and build infrastructure.  Leverage influence and advocate for public policy Call on all levels of government to integrate a justice lens into their climate solutions. The climate action plans developed by the cities of Portland and Oakland are great examples of how to integrate racial equity into government plans.  We commend the efforts that businesses already have made, with over 1,300 commitments that formally recognize the transition to a net-zero economy. But businesses are only starting to scratch the surface on climate justice solutions. When business solutions center those most affected by global crises — whether a pandemic or climate change — and improve these communities, everyone benefits. When they are left behind, everyone’s harmed. Now’s the moment to build a truly inclusive future. Pull Quote Billions of dollars will be spent, saved and made during this transition. Identify the business activities that disproportionately affect communities on the basis of race, and develop solutions centered in climate justice and racial equity. Topics Social Justice Leadership BSR Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Global Climate Strike in New York City. Photo by Katie Rodriguez on Unsplash. Close Authorship

Read more here:
5 ways businesses can take action to reduce environmental racism

MIT Scientists Create 3D-Printed Artificial Bone

June 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on MIT Scientists Create 3D-Printed Artificial Bone

Scientists at MIT have figured out a way to produce a 3D-printed artificial bone  that is just as lightweight and durable as the real thing. By analyzing the structural patterns found in natural bone and mother of pearl, the team has produced a 3D-printed material that mimics the structure and performance actual bones. The new material is part of MIT’s quest to create a line of super durable and efficient metamaterials that can be used in anything from construction to medical uses. Read the rest of MIT Scientists Create 3D-Printed Artificial Bone Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed bone , 3D printing , eco design , green design , MIT , sustainable design , Sustainable Materials        

Read the rest here:
MIT Scientists Create 3D-Printed Artificial Bone

MS PlanetSolar Turanor: World’s Largest Solar-Powered Boat Docks in NYC

June 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on MS PlanetSolar Turanor: World’s Largest Solar-Powered Boat Docks in NYC

Inhabitat is getting our sea legs this morning aboard the world’s largest solar-powered boat , which docked today at the North Cove Marina in downtown Manhattan. NYC is the MS Tûranor PlanetSolar ‘s second stop along its expedition across the Atlantic Ocean to study the effects of climate change along the Gulf Stream. Stay tuned here as we post more photos and info from the boat! READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , biobox , Climate Change , eco-vessel , gulf stream , PlanetSolar , planetsolar deepwater , PlanetSolar’s Tûranor , solar boat , Solar Power , solar powered boat , solar powered vessel , TÛRANOR PlanetSolar , TÛRANOR PlanetSolar circumnavigation , TÛRANOR PlanetSolar solar , TÛRANOR PlanetSolar world , TURANOR , university of geneva , world’s largest solar powered boat        

View post:
MS PlanetSolar Turanor: World’s Largest Solar-Powered Boat Docks in NYC

Japan Undergoes Solar Boom With Over 7.4 GW Already Installed

June 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Japan Undergoes Solar Boom With Over 7.4 GW Already Installed

As the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant continues to leak radiation , Japan is turning its sights away from atomic power and towards solar energy. At the end of 2012, the country had installed solar power-generating arrays that provide a total 7.4GW capacity. According to Bloomberg analysts, that number is expected to double. The explosive growth, thanks to a feed-in tariff established by former prime minister, Naoto Kan, could establish Japan as the second fastest emerging solar market behind China and trailing only Germany and Italy in size of installed infrastructure. Read the rest of Japan Undergoes Solar Boom With Over 7.4 GW Already Installed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: china , Feed-in Tariff , france , fukushima daiichi , germany , italy , Japan , naoto kan , renewables , Solar Power        

View original here:
Japan Undergoes Solar Boom With Over 7.4 GW Already Installed

Gorgeous Contemporary Home in South Wales Built From Recycled Materials

April 21, 2011 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Gorgeous Contemporary Home in South Wales Built From Recycled Materials

Read the rest of Gorgeous Contemporary Home in South Wales Built From Recycled Materials http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sips” , “structural insulated panels” , “sustainable architecture” , Biodigestor , Feilden Fowles , green architecture , Green Building , inhabitat , Sustainable Building , Ty Pren

See the rest here: 
Gorgeous Contemporary Home in South Wales Built From Recycled Materials

Albino Alligator sustainable mixed-use development by Maxwan

July 13, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Albino Alligator sustainable mixed-use development by Maxwan

Eco Factor: Sustainable mixed-use development aims to reduce energy consumption. Maxwan Architects have proposed the Albino Alligator mixed-use development to initiate regeneration in Amsterdam. Named according to its shape, the Albino Alligator will go beyond standard mixed-use typologies

See original here:
Albino Alligator sustainable mixed-use development by Maxwan

Bad Behavior has blocked 2770 access attempts in the last 7 days.