Cariuma teams up with Mike Vallely for 100% vegan shoes

November 16, 2021 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Cariuma teams up with Mike Vallely for 100% vegan shoes

In a partnership between lovers of nature, shoe brand Cariuma has coordinated with Mike Vallely, a legend in the skateboarding world, to develop a 100% vegan shoe that pairs well with a skateboard, a night on the town and at a PETA gathering. Cariuma isn’t new to sustainable materials, but is excited to expand their offerings to include the Mike Vallely x Cariuma sneaker. It represents the first product rolled out with the newest addition vegan suede. According to the company, the high-performance material is, “Tough like [Vallely]. This innovative material is 2.7X more resistant than animal suede, and was formulated and developed to create stellar performance and durability.” Related: Sylven New York has vegan shoes made from apples In an industry plagued with headlines around dirty manufacturing and long-term post-consumer waste , the Mike Vallely x Cariuma sneaker offers an earth and animal friendly option.  Although it clearly has feet on the ground in its concern for the environment , Cariuma didn’t stop at dabbling in environmentally-friendly materials here and there. In fact, they’ve recently achieved B-Corp certification, a process that ensures a dedication to the planet at every step of material selection, production and sales. The company reports being the first skate shoe company to earn B-Corp certification. Tuning into the stylish trends Vallely has influenced throughout his career, the contrasting materials and details on the skate shoe mirrors his not-so-subtle style on the board and in front of the mic as lead vocalist for the band Black Flag.  “The must-have for this shoe was for it to be free of animal-based materials yet still be tough and long-lasting,” said Vallely. “We’ve sourced some excellent materials for this shoe, namely vegan suede and recycled nylon that make the shoe strong, light and give it a reduced carbon footprint.” Durability was an important aspect of the design in an effort to ensure a long and useful life, even standing up to the elements on the street. But the team was able to maintain the longevity quotient in conjunction with a recycled mesh lining and rec y cled webbing, featuring a natural rubber -reinforced outsole.  The shoe also features a plant-based insole made with Mamona oil. The laces, threads and labels are all made from recycled materials. These combined efforts are leading the shoe for Oeko-Tex standard 100 certification. + Cariuma Images via Cariuma

More:
Cariuma teams up with Mike Vallely for 100% vegan shoes

The Role of Solid Oxide Technology in the Hydrogen Economy: A Primer

November 16, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Role of Solid Oxide Technology in the Hydrogen Economy: A Primer

With today’s climate crisis looming large, the energy industry is at a critical juncture and must rapidly evolve its approach to catalyze change and accelerate decarbonization. As countries commit to net-zero emissions goals, the need for hydrogen is becoming clear. However, despite escalating interest and growing momentum, the market is still in its early stages. Most would argue that the successful transition to a hydrogen economy, and our best chance for a net-zero future, hinges on the following: can clean hydrogen be produced efficiently, cost-effectively, and at scale? That’s where Bloom Energy comes in.  At Bloom Energy, we aren’t just selling a product – we’re selling a vision for the future. At the heart of this vision is the solid oxide cell. Built for Mars and deployed on Main Street, Bloom Energy’s solid oxide fuel cell platform is uniquely designed to address both the causes and consequences of our changing climate, decarbonizing our world’s most difficult-to-decarbonize industries. Bloom’s purpose-built platform has the flexibility to be deployed as a distributed generator of electricity, or as an electrolyzer to produce green hydrogen. ‘The Role of Solid Oxide Technology in the Hydrogen Economy’ discusses the growing momentum in hydrogen and the inherent advantages of solid oxide technology in a broad variety of hydrogen applications. Download today.

View original here:
The Role of Solid Oxide Technology in the Hydrogen Economy: A Primer

Park and Polk is a mixed-use building shaped like an H

November 8, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Park and Polk is a mixed-use building shaped like an H

San Diego , California is the site of a new mixed-use building, located between the Hillcrest and University Heights parts of town at a site that sat barren and empty for ten years. Developed by Jonathan Segal Architect, the building is known as Park and Polk. Park and Polk features 43 residential rental units, seven office studios, ground-floor retail spaces and four low-income units. In contrast to most buildings that offer low-income housing , there was no government support during the build. Instead, Jonathan Segal, being both the architect and developer of the project, absorbed all the costs upfront.  Related: Designing sustainable habitats at the San Diego Zoo The space is a hub of varied activities and the infrastructure supports them all. Public spaces encourage mingling between office, retail and apartment residents. The rooftop features a large common area to prepare and BBQ food while taking in expansive views of the surrounding city. Huge concrete planters house native grasses and large olive trees that filter rainwater.  The overall shape of the building makes an “H” shape, a choice that allows natural light to fill each of the spaces inside. The copious windows also pairs indoor life with exterior views. Passive design elements provide natural ventilation, but the primary energy needs are fully offset by a solar panel system on the rooftop. Individual units also offer outdoor space with decks that allow for views while maintaining privacy. On the ground floor along Park Boulevard, trees line the street where the transition to the glazed commercial area, offering protected seating.  “The western elevation has thin delicate fins that provide lighting and heat control ,” stated in a press release from Jonathan Segal. “When traveling up and down Park Boulevard, the articulating façade is rhythmically changing. Light romantically defines different shadows as the sun passes and the form, which can appear as a solid mass, breaks apart into the individual linear elements. The fins, modeled off of vintage car grilles, were delicately cast in place and taper from only three inches at the face to six inches where they bite into the slab cantilevering off of the building.” + Jonathan Segal Architect Photography by Matthew Segal and Jeff Durkin

Read the rest here:
Park and Polk is a mixed-use building shaped like an H

Explore Minetta Lane, a green townhouse with a climbing wall

September 16, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Explore Minetta Lane, a green townhouse with a climbing wall

Kushner Studios has completed a major renovation of a century-old townhouse in Minetta Lane, Greenwich Village. Glorious expansive living spaces look out onto New York’s skyline through a woven steel and foliage facade. The towering home even has its own  climbing wall! With over 4,800 square feet of interior space and 1,200 square feet of outdoor and roof space, this extensive home at Minetta Lane in Manhattan offers five bedrooms, multiple living spaces, four bathrooms, a jacuzzi, and a gym. Its 83-foot tall rock climbing wall is the tallest east of Reno, Nevada. Related: Extraordinary treehouse is a climber’s dream with its own indoor climbing wall Kushner Studios took on the $2.7 million renovation intending to leave the historical shell intact and create a new interior and vertical extension. The original streetscape was preserved. “The crossing tree limbs forming Gothic archways fronting the Minetta Street, inspired the defining narrative structure played out in the building’s newly inserted facade. The playful steel facade is covered in Ivy adding a green wall terminus to the street as an homage to the past and a vision of public good will,” a project statement explains. Interior designer Robert Isabell previously owned the townhouse and created as much streetside greenery as possible, lending the building its name as the Salad House. Evoking rural landscapes, the huge stacked chord woodpile in the triple-height living room has been harvested by hand from the owner’s property upstate and can keep the inhabitants warm via a total of nine woodburning fireplaces. This alternative heat source is in addition to the incorporation of solar panels.  Natural finishes and materials are abundant throughout the five-story home, from the floorings in wood and rope to the rustic stairs and built-in storage in naturally varied timbers . The home’s smaller service areas work to serve the adjacent larger served spaces. The bedrooms, for example, have secondary work or office spaces alongside them. A mid-level convertible open space demarcates the original home from the additional floors added.  The roof features cooking and entertaining space plus thrilling views of the city. The rock climbing wall is situated in the rear courtyard and provides a surreal urban sports experience.  Construction took a total of seven years, from May 2012 to January 2020. + Kushner Studios Images via Kushner Studios

Go here to see the original: 
Explore Minetta Lane, a green townhouse with a climbing wall

ODA’s vibrant new complex transforms a conventional DC block

September 8, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on ODA’s vibrant new complex transforms a conventional DC block

West Half by ODA New York is a multi-use complex that combines architecture, interior design and landscape design to promote environmentally-friendly construction and harness a sense of community. Located in Washington, D.C.’s Navy Yard, the 10-story project takes up a full city block and consists of 465 apartments, outdoor terraces and an inner courtyard, among several other amenities. While the top eight levels are strictly residential, the bottom two connect with the community at the street level through restaurants and retail. The building consists of volumes with bright yellow underbellies that playfully cantilever off each other in a horseshoe around a central courtyard. This push and pull effect creates terraces and balconies with views directed north towards the Capitol Building and south to Nationals Park. Since the floors are stacked to maximize the number of terraces and enhance the cascading effect of the pop-outs, the facade tapers in towards the courtyard as it ascends, creating a similar effect to the ballpark stands in the Nationals stadium close by. Related: Green terraces intersect a mixed-use tower in Shenzhen Innovative eco-friendly strategies make an appearance in the terraces and are the grounds for the building’s LEED Gold Certification. Cisterns harvest water to irrigate West Half’s many gardens. Extensive green roof systems cover 50% of the roof and require minimal irrigation and maintenance. Through the built-in planters on the roof and balconies, the facades grow and adapt to the changing seasons. The interior of the mixed-used development carefully considers human scale and experience. A rich material palette, natural light and optimal airflow have all been taken into consideration to make the spaces feel fresh and energetic. A blur between interior and exterior conditions is created through layers of transparency using floor-to-ceiling glazing and glass balustrades. JBG Smith, the developer, expressed that “the main challenge of the project was to develop an innovative approach that would comply with the strict Washington D.C. regulations for privately developed buildings, while creating something iconic for the neighborhood .” Because of the bustling surroundings, ODA and JBG Smith wanted the development to encourage richer, collective experiences for residents, stadium visitors and tourists . “This building is an expression of what the future of urban living can be,” said Eran Chen, founder and chief architect at ODA. + ODA New York Images by Scott Frances

More:
ODA’s vibrant new complex transforms a conventional DC block

Wind-powered lamp post helps reduce light pollution

September 3, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Wind-powered lamp post helps reduce light pollution

Tobias Trübenbacher, a design student from Berlin, has created a wind-powered lamp post that uses an integrated wind rotor to generate energy and a motion detection system to create an insect-friendly light spectrum. “Light pollution not only has bad health effects on humans, like causing sleep disorders, depression, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and cancer, but has also a serious impact on flora and fauna,” said the designer in a press release. “Extinction of species, orientation loss of migratory birds, significant disorder for fish migration, as well as disturbed biorhythms of plants like for instance delayed leaf shedding, are only a fraction of these consequences. It is estimated that currently in Germany alone around 1.2 billion insects die because of street lighting in one single summer night.” Every year, the global artificial  light  quotient grows by 6%, while 83% of the world’s population already experiences an unnaturally bright night sky. Related: COVID-19 lockdowns lead to decreasing light pollution Papilio is trying to change this by reducing the ecological footprint of street lamps. The lamp uses an integrated Savonius rotor made of folded sheet metal and connected to a 300-watt generator to produce climate-neutral energy. Thanks to the upgraded technology and the rotor’s diagonal orientation, it can operate no matter which direction the  wind  blows. The motor works with both vertical wind that occurs naturally and horizontal air streams that come from things like air traffic flow. A rechargeable  battery  stores the generated electricity for moments when the wind dies down, meaning the Papilio can operate autonomously without the need for underground infrastructure for electricity. The device can even be plugged into an existing power grid to feed extra energy into the network when winds are particularly high.  The light is emitted in a downward direction below the horizontal to minimize light pollution. An infrared sensor only activates the light when it is needed (for example, when people are walking around under it), but it also uses a light spectrum that has a lower blue component and a warm color temperature to make it less attractive to  insects . Papilio gets its name from the Latin word for butterfly, which honors both the physical shape of the product, as well as the protection for nocturnal insects from the negative effects of light pollution that it helps provide. “With PAPILIO, the process of generating energy becomes the central element of the street lamp and anaesthetic play, enriching streets, walkways and city squares — both during the day and at night,” the designer continues. “It is a street lamp for a future worth living in.” + Tobias Trübenbacher Via Dezeen Images courtesy of Tobias Trübenbacher

View post: 
Wind-powered lamp post helps reduce light pollution

Viewfinder House combines great views with energy efficiency

August 18, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Viewfinder House combines great views with energy efficiency

In an initial meeting with Faulkner Architects, the client requested every room be oriented towards the Sierra Nevada Mountains. It took some out-of-the-box thinking, but somehow the design team managed to stay in the box while achieving that goal. Called Viewfinder House, this home is located in Truckee, CA, a launching point for myriad outdoor activities in every season. Even at 7,200 square feet with a pool, the design offers unique architecture and environmentally friendly features. The body of the home is made up of two rectangular boxes, with connections between the spaces via covered porches. The lower level is contoured to match the property line, but the upper level is rotated to take full advantage of Pacific Crest mountain views. Related: House Lhotka brings energy-efficient home design to the Czech Republic The team relied on steel for the base to hold up against deep winter snow, and an exterior rain screen of red cedar, which also shields the home from the street while allowing  natural light  to filter in.  Passive design elements create shade and promote  energy efficiency  throughout the home, starting with the roof overhang that protects the glass doors from weather and solar gain inside the home. High-efficiency boilers conserve energy and work in conjunction with effective radiantly heated floors. The back of the lower level takes advantage of earth sheltering to organically insulate the home, and natural ventilation is found through window and door placement. Faulkner Architects emphasized using enhanced-efficiency glazing and insulation for a tight construction envelope. According to a press release, these combined efforts help the building achieve a 14.5% improvement in efficiency, above the already strict California energy code.   Outdoors, the surrounding hillsides are covered in native  plants  and mature trees. The materials removed from the pool and house excavation were saved and used for the nearby terraced landscaping. + Faulkner Architects Photography by Paul Hamill

Read the original here:
Viewfinder House combines great views with energy efficiency

Sloth’s House offers a large family an escape into nature with minimal impact

July 6, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Sloth’s House offers a large family an escape into nature with minimal impact

Great architectural design melds the needs of the inhabitants with the surrounding landscape. In the case of Casa da Preguiça (Sloth’s House), that means providing an escape for a large family while presenting the best opportunities to immerse the residents in nature and view the prevalent sloths in the area. Casa da Preguiça, located in the lush Atlantic Forest in Iporanga, São Paulo in Brazil, is designed by Nautilo Arquitetura & Gerenciamento. The building is camouflaged on just over 0.3 acres. Related: Luxurious eco-resort overlooks Sri Lankan’s most famous wildlife park In order to maintain minimal site impact on the steep lot and accommodate the space needed by the client, the team built the house up in three levels. From the street, a bridge connects to the garage. The main spaces of the home are contained in two rectangular-shaped volumes that overlap. The first and second floors are in one volume, while the swimming pool and third floor fill the other. Most of the bedroom suites are located on the first floor. On the second floor, the design includes the living area and two additional bedrooms. The main gathering space is surrounded by vertical circulation, enrobed in natural light and laid out for cross ventilation, all of which facilitate a tight, energy-efficient design. The third floor includes three bedrooms, a game room and a sauna, leaving no question about available amenities. The entire space offers views of the surrounding landscape and the best opportunity to see the home’s namesake mammal. The interior design promotes an industrial vibe with exposed electrical piping, concrete block walls and a polished concrete floor. Stairways are open, framed in steel and glass. In contrast to the gray materials, the space is accented with a blast of yellow in tilework, beams and soffits. The choice of natural materials, mostly wood , for the furniture and finishings further marries the comfortable indoor space with the natural surroundings. + Nautilo Arquitetura & Gerenciamento Photography by Alessandro Guimarães via Nautilo Arquitetura

Original post:
Sloth’s House offers a large family an escape into nature with minimal impact

Natural light floods this solar-powered business school in Frankfurt

October 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Natural light floods this solar-powered business school in Frankfurt

According to the World Green Building Council , students score higher on tests and learn up to 26% faster when placed in rooms lit by natural light. Danish practice Henning Larsen Architects took this report to heart when they designed the Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, a light-filled academic building that officially opens today. Powered by solar and wind energy, this sustainability-minded business school takes cues from its urban surroundings while setting “new standards for transparent and open learning in the world of business and finance.” Transparency, community, and visibility are key to the design of the 32,790-square-meter Frankfurt School of Finance & Management . To open the school up the urban setting, the architects centered the development around the Street of Knowledge, a long public atrium that echoes The Zeil, one of Frankfurt’s oldest commercial streets. A wide variety of glass-fronted rooms branch off on either side of the Street of Knowledge in two north-south facing volumes that reinforce the atrium’s likeness to a real city street. Above the third floor terrace, these two parallel buildings turn into five offset towers of flexible 400-square-meter office units. Designed to the DGNB Platinum standard, the school reduces demands of primary energy by 60 percent as compared to the German energy saving ordinance (EnEV) standards. Computer simulations and calculations led the architects to optimize the building shape and facade, constructed with a mix of opaque and transparent elements, early on in the design process to minimize energy needs, solar radiation, noise pollution, and wind. Rooftop photovoltaics and a wind turbine supplement energy needs, while rainwater retention systems slow the effects of intense rainfall. The skylight and careful building orientation maximize access to natural light . Related: Frankfurt named the most sustainable city on the planet “As architects we know that light is one of the most important factors for learning,” said Partner and Design Principal at Henning Larsen, Louis Becker. “It helps improving our focus and performance. My hope and ambition is that the varied daylight-filled spaces we have created for Frankfurt School of Finance & Management will contribute to the important task of educating students that will excel within their field and give something back to the city of Frankfurt.” + Henning Larsen Images by Henning Larsen/Karsten Thormaehlen

Original post:
Natural light floods this solar-powered business school in Frankfurt

LEED-seeking brick building in Montreal hides funky geode-like courtyard

October 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on LEED-seeking brick building in Montreal hides funky geode-like courtyard

Montreal’s ADHOC Architectes  created a beautiful residential building whose ubiquitous brick facade hides a crystalline-filled courtyard—inspired by the geode. Located in the trendy Plateau Mont-Royal neighborhood, La Géode’s many sustainable features are expected to earn the project Canada’s first LEED v4 certification for a multi-unit building. At first glance, the building looks like any other in the area. However, the brick facade – much like a geode – hides a crystalline treasure on the interior. The unique design of the five-unit residential building began with optimizing the footprint to create a layout that would be conducive to a quality living environment, based on maximum efficiency. By blending the street entry and alley space, the architects created a central entryway that leads into the inner courtyard. Related: Beekeeper built dream hexagonal house without ‘hateful’ right angles A small walkway covered in grey and white panels leads into the open-air courtyard , covered in the same facade. The space was strategically designed to create a sense of privacy for the residents as well as a pleasant outdoor space for socializing. In addition to creating a healthy communal space, the courtyard helps provide natural light and cross ventilation of the units, all of which come with private loggias that open up to the exterior. The walls were also built to have high acoustic performance, blocking out a lot of street noise, again enhancing residents’ quality of life. A large part of the design was focused on providing sufficient greenery for the tenants. Various shrub, climbing species and trees were planted to grow freely on the floor and the walls of the inner courtyard, adding to its healthy-living atmosphere. This greenery, along with the building’s high energy performance and various green features, are expected to earn the building a LEED v4 certification , a first for this kind of structure in Canada. + ADHOC Architectes Photography by Adrien Williams

Continued here:
LEED-seeking brick building in Montreal hides funky geode-like courtyard

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 6694 access attempts in the last 7 days.