Metal-clad Treehouse for "no-commute lifestyles" mimics Portlands forests

February 15, 2018 by  
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With projects like LEVER Architecture’s recently completed Treehouse, it’s little wonder Portland, Ore. scores high marks for livability and sustainability. Located on the Marquam Hill campus of the Oregon Health & Science University (OSHU), Treehouse caters to those interested in a “live/work/no-commute lifestyle”. Designed for mixed use , the seven-story houses 69 apartment units as well as retail on the ground floor. Taking cues from the forest, Treehouse is wrapped in a textured metal skin that mimics the color and form of tree trunks. The facade’s consistent texture and pattern give the building a dynamic depth and appearance that changes throughout the day. “The design bridges the urban and topographical qualities of the campus by placing the building as an “in the round” object in the forest,” wrote the architects. “Instead of cutting into the hill, the building form is carved to follow the landscape. A continuous carved building skin is achieved by eliminating the expression of floor levels by incorporating all expansion joints into the custom window surrounds.” Related: Nation’s tallest timber building to rise in Portland The apartment units are clustered around a compact central core housing the stairs and elevator. Glazing can be found on all sides of the irregular octagonal building and maximize daylight into the studio and one-bedroom units. A rain garden landscape and deck on the lower level handles all stormwater runoff. + LEVER Architecture Via ArchDaily Images via LEVER Architecture

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Metal-clad Treehouse for "no-commute lifestyles" mimics Portlands forests

Spectacular wildflower roof grows atop a dreamy Texan cabana

December 6, 2017 by  
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You might not think a cabana could outshine a glistening blue pool—especially in the Texan heat—but this Pool House in Texas’ City of West Lake Hills is a scene-stealer. Murray Legge Architecture designed this dwelling topped with a flourishing wildflower green roof in a project that’s so beautiful we can’t help but wonder what the main residence looks like. The pool house project was also designed to minimize impervious surfaces and aid in management of stormwater runoff. A modernist beauty, the City of West Lake Hills Pool House and the surrounding area emphasize clean lines, steel framing, and glass. Light-colored stone stairs leading down to the pool are raised off the slope to allow water to pass through, while grasses grow in the space between treads. An innovative suspended and permeable stone terrace system surrounds the L-shaped pool. Stone also makes up much of the Pool House and are stacked in large blocks to give the exterior a beautifully textured appearance. Glazing wraps around the front of the building and opens up to create an indoor-outdoor dining area complemented by an outdoor wood stove and high-end residential kitchen. Timber is featured prominently in the Pool House, where it lines the interiors and is used for furnishing. The vaulted roof arches upwards, echoing the surrounding canyon hills, and gives the structure a more airy feel. Related: 42mm Architecture’s sculptural Pool House in India is wrapped in a curved concrete shell “Impervious cover and storm water run-off regulations within the city are very restrictive,” wrote the architects. “The City of West Lake Hills granted a variance to allow the construction of a garden roof and accepted it as permeable cover through a variance process. This variance was a first for the City of West Lake Hills and points to the city’s progressive environmental policies.” The architects also added that they stacked much of the project’s equipment and programs beneath the green roof to minimize impervious surfaces. + Murray Legge Architecture Images by Ryann Ford, Murray Legge, Whit Preston

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Spectacular wildflower roof grows atop a dreamy Texan cabana

Rainwater-harvesting pavilions mimic a lush rainforest at the Indianapolis Zoo

October 23, 2017 by  
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Artful rainwater design has taken root at the Indianapolis Zoo. RATIO Architects recently completed the Bicentennial Pavilion, an open-air events space modeled after a lush rainforest with 11 steel-framed “tree canopies.” Built primarily from natural materials, the pavilion is a beautiful example of multifunctional and sustainable design that provides 40,000 square feet of weather-protected events space while collecting and filtering 100% of its stormwater runoff. The Indianapolis Zoo Bicentennial Pavilion and Promenade was made possible by a $10 million grant provided by the Lilly Endowment in 2015. The money came with the requirement that the zoo “implement a game-changing initiative that benefits the community institution’s long-term sustainability.” To satisfy the zoo’s needs to expand visitor infrastructure and the Lilly Endowment’s condition, RATIO Architects designed an open-air multifunctional facility that could be used year-round and replace the zoo’s former 400-person events tent tucked into the back-of-house areas. The sustainability angle came from the use of natural materials —each tree-like column is built of 63 individual timber beams, while a hearth of rough-back quarry block limestone rests beneath the canopy—and stormwater management . The pavilion canopy funnels rainwater down the tree-like column’s laser-cut weathered steel rain screens and into planting beds, where it then percolates through a water quality unit and is held in a 14-foot deep water detention bed designed to accommodate 100-year flood events. The angled pavilion canopy is built of translucent roofing materials to let filtered light shine through, just as in a real rainforest canopy. Related: Stunning solar Butterfly House masters resource conservation in California The Bicentennial Pavilion is split up into two main event areas, each of which accommodate up to 400 guests. The pavilion can also be converted into one large event space for up to 800 guests. The pavilion’s north side is designed for the new bird exhibition, Magnificent Macaws, with a custom-designed stage and perch to showcase the birds on their twice-daily flight through the Pavilion. + RATIO Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Susan Fleck

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Lotus-inspired public space collects rainwater to reduce Da Nangs runoff footprint

August 28, 2017 by  
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Urban stormwater runoff poses serious risks to safety and the environment and cities around the world are taking note. HUNI Architectes tackles Da Nang’s runoff footprint with their competition-winning design for the Da Nang City Center Square in Vietnam. Designed with SUDS (sustainable urban drainage systems), this attractive lotus flower-inspired square will create a vibrant public space and destination that collects and reduces stormwater runoff. HUNI Architectes’ design beat a shortlist of 15 proposals in a competition organized by the city as part of a greater masterplan to transform Da Nang into Vietnam’s most modernized metropolis by 2030. The architects’ vision for Da Nang City Center Square draws inspiration from Vietnam’s national flower, the lotus , which symbolizes divine beauty. The plaza’s multiple shade structures take the form of giant lotus leaves, while a massive undulating canopy seems to reference the leaves’ gently crinkled shape. Circular granite paving patterns allude to ripples in a lake and are punctuated by circular grassy planters and lotus-pink play areas. Reducing stormwater runoff was a major goal of the design. Impervious surfaces like asphalt will be swapped out for pervious materials such as permeable paving and landscaping, while tree pits will be designed to collect, slow, and filter the flow of stormwater. Water features and interactive fountains will double as SUDS (sustainable urban drainage systems) and can be enjoyed year-round along with lighting and performance sets. Related: Vietnam Constructs World’s Largest Dragon-Shaped Bridge – And It Breathes Fire! The contemporary new plaza is also sensitive to its historic surroundings. HUNI Architectes worked to preserve existing buildings on site, including the Han Market, which will be refurbished to increase its appeal to locals and tourists alike. To make the space pedestrian friendly , parking will be tucked underground and there will be easy access to public transport. Bike sharing facilities will spring up in the “Mobility Hubs” at Han Market and cyclists will be able to enjoy a special lane shared with public transport. + HUNI Architectes Via ArchDaily

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James Corner Field Operations designs an iconic circular park for the Philadelphia Navy Yard

October 7, 2015 by  
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Schemata studio renovates an old Japanese home while leaving its wooden skeleton intact

October 7, 2015 by  
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The amazing affordable NexusHaus generates more energy than it consumes

October 6, 2015 by  
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Team Ontario’s Super Efficient ECHO Solar Decathlon House Could Revolutionize the Housing Market

October 8, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Team Ontario’s Super Efficient ECHO Solar Decathlon House Could Revolutionize the Housing Market Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , 2013 solar decathlon , cradle-to-cradle , ECHO house , energy performance , local materials , modular housing , passive shading , Recycled Materials , smart design , Solar Decathlon , solar panels , stormwater runoff , team ontario , vacuum insulation panels        

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Stanford’s Start.Home is Built Around a Next-Gen Prefab Core at the Solar Decathlon 2013

October 8, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Stanford’s Start.Home is Built Around a Next-Gen Prefab Core at the Solar Decathlon 2013 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , “sustainable architecture” , 2013 solar decathlon , 2013sd , CA , eco design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , irvine , net zero , Prefab , prefab home , prefabricated core , sd2013 , Solar Decathlon , solar decathlon 2013 , solar home , stanford , stanford university , start.home , starthome , student project , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , Zero energy        

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Stanford’s Start.Home is Built Around a Next-Gen Prefab Core at the Solar Decathlon 2013

Apple Supply Chain Report Reveals Labor and Environmental Violations

January 25, 2013 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock Apple released its annual supplier responsibility report this week, which detailed a number of labor and environmental violations in the company’s supply chain. The most troubling revelation, and the one that is getting the most media attention, is the discovery of multiple cases of child labor, as the internal audit found that 106 children were employed at 11 factories that produced Apple products in the past year. But that isn’t all; the audit also found that many of the company’s suppliers failed to properly store and handle hazardous waste, and that over 100 facilities failed to recycle or properly dispose of hazardous waste . Read the rest of Apple Supply Chain Report Reveals Labor and Environmental Violations Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: apple , Apple audit , Apple Computers , child labor , china , corporate accountability , environmental destruction , environmental regulations , foxconn , hazardous chemicals , hazardous materials , internal audit , iPhone , labor , labor violations , mac , shenzhen , Steve Jobs , stormwater runoff , supply chain , tim cook , transparency

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