Eco-friendly Community Rowing Boathouse boasts a stunning kinetic facade

June 27, 2018 by  
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Cambridge-based Anmahian Winton Architects has designed a new eco-friendly home for the largest public rowing organization in the United States—the Community Rowing Boathouse in Boston, Massachusetts. Created to offer rowing opportunities at all skill levels, the modern community landmark comprises two buildings that cater to underserved populations, such as Boston public middle school students, the physically disabled and veterans. To lower energy demands and reduce the rowing boathouse’s environmental footprint, Anmahian Winton Architects optimized the buildings for natural lighting and ventilation and also installed stormwater reuse systems and geothermal wells. Located on the south side of the Charles River in the Boston neighborhood of Brighton, the Community Rowing Boathouse’s site had long been used as a staging area for heavy construction equipment. Instead of simply plopping a building on site, Anmahian Winton Architects considered the surrounding environment in their design and sought to remediate the land and restore habitat in the process. Thus, the design process included improving soil permeability and the implementation of stormwater and rainwater harvesting and reuse. The larger building’s appearance was also created in response to the environment and features a kinetic facade that changes shape with the movement of the sun and users’ movements around the structure while mimicking the rhythmic patterns of rowing and the river. Related: Boston outlines its plans to adapt to rising sea levels “CRI’s design expands the traditional vocabulary of rowing facilities on the river, reflecting the proportions and cladding of regional precedents, such as New England’s iconic tobacco barns and covered bridges, and anchoring this new building to its surroundings,” explains Anmahian Winton Architects. “The main building’s pre-fabricated kinetic cladding system of large-scale, hand-operated panels facilitated fabrication and expedited installation on a compressed construction schedule. These operable vents eliminate the need for mechanical cooling and ventilation of the 300-foot long boat storage bays, providing functionality and energy efficiency. Glass shingles sheath the sculling pavilion to protect, ventilate and display smaller boats to the adjacent parkway.” + Anmahian Winton Architects Images by Jane Messinger

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Eco-friendly Community Rowing Boathouse boasts a stunning kinetic facade

Avant-garde school in Chicago will teach kids how to grow their own organic food

May 26, 2016 by  
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Located in Chicago’s Garfield Ridge neighborhood, the AGC is a fast-growing K-8 Public Charter School that will soon welcome a pre-K program. To accommodate its growing student body, AGC hired Studio Gang to design a new campus that eschews traditional schooling for a model that encourages curiosity and embraces natural systems into everyday learning. As a result, the typical boxy classroom is traded for a series of indoor and outdoor learning environments grouped together into “learning neighborhoods” with fluid boundaries to encourage learning and interaction between students of different grade levels. A “Wonder Path” seamlessly connects the different neighborhoods and environments together, from indoor to outdoor and from hands-on laboratories to play areas. One of the greatest features of the new 65,000-square-foot school will be a three-acre urban farm, design in partnership with Growing Power , that will be integrated into the daily curriculum. Students will learn how to grow their own food, care for farm animals, and prepare the produce into meals for breakfast and lunch. “Participating in farming, food preparation, and animal care creates opportunities for students to learn about the relationship between humans and nature, while also developing patience, self-confidence, empathy, and an open mind to healthy new foods and to becoming a better global and local citizen,” says an AGC press release. Related: Farming preschool would teach kids how to grow their own food The architecture will also embody the school’s commitment to sustainable practices. The building will be constructed with locally sourced materials and harness energy from solar and geothermal sources. Passive solar principles will be followed in order to maximize photovoltaic energy collection and maximize natural daylighting. Stormwater will also be collected and reused on-site. AGC aims to become a net-positive school that produces more energy than it consumes and is slated for completion in 2018. + Studio Gang Architects Images via Studio Gang Architects

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Avant-garde school in Chicago will teach kids how to grow their own organic food

Four florists filled a London restaurant with luscious botanical art installations

May 26, 2016 by  
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The Flower Appreciation Society decorated the entrance to the restaurant , designed by James Wyatt in 1779, creating a beautiful passage leading visitors to the reception area. Once they reach the restaurant’s gallery dining room via a staircase decorated with roses and various flowers, visitors can enjoy an area filled with vintage furniture designed by Martin Creed, featuring a wall lined with sketches by artist David Shringley. Related: Artisan Moss’ plant paintings effortlessly bring the beauty of green walls indoors London florist JamJar introduced a large floral canopy to the Champagne Pommery Lounge, while Carly Rogers Flowers transformed the passage from the stairs to the toilets into a woodland garden. The four installations work together to create a surreal experience, while keeping their own unique atmospheres. Related: Orla Kiely’s ‘Intimate Garden Shed’ is a Tiny Pop-Up Home Filled With Plants “I feel all four installations work independently and are so magical that you forget the space they’re in,” said Mourad Mazouz, the restaurant’s founder and owner. “At the same time, the gardens only exist because of the room they are in. If you think with this project that each room is a landscape, the installations by all four florists explore their relationship with the building,” he added. Via Dezeen

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Four florists filled a London restaurant with luscious botanical art installations

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