5 simple ways to reduce your food waste right now

October 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 5 simple ways to reduce your food waste right now

Food waste is a huge problem worldwide, with one-third of all globally produced food ending up wasted. Americans throw away about 43 percent of the food they buy, and the organic matter in landfills emits methane, which is a major factor in climate change . We are enticed into wanting our food to look perfect, and we also don’t want to spend much on it. Americans generally spend less on their food compared to other nations, and because of that, many people don’t value it or think much about throwing it out. So what can the average person do to fight back? Here is a list of ways that you can reduce your food waste right now. Start meal planning This may seem like common sense, but it is one of the easiest and most important things to do. Plan out your meals in advance, and then make a detailed list of ingredients you will need. Then, when you get to the store, stick with the plan. This will help you avoid buying too much food. Plus, it also saves you time and money at the store. If you buy only what you expect to use, you will be more likely to keep it fresh and use it all. Also, be sure to check your cupboards and refrigerator before going to the grocery store or farmers market , so you don’t buy things you already have on hand. Store and prep properly It is easy to buy fruits, vegetables and other perishable items and then forget about them. But if you store and prep everything properly, it can significantly help you reduce your food waste. When you get home from the market, take the time to wash and prep your fresh food, then store it in containers for easy  cooking  and snacking. Put items you plan to use in the next day or two in the fridge, and put the surplus in the freezer. Eat leftovers If you cook too much or have extra after going out for dinner or enjoying takeout, save your leftovers to enjoy later. Invest in quality food storage containers, because they will keep your food fresh for longer. Come up with a labeling system to help you keep track of how long the leftovers have been in your fridge. Almost half of extra restaurant food alone is thrown in the trash instead of boxed up and taken home, so learn to love leftovers for the sake of minimizing food waste. Watch your portions Speaking of restaurant leftovers … they occur because restaurant portion sizes are significantly larger than they should be. You can’t force restaurants to give you a smaller portion (although you can embrace the leftovers), but you can control your portions at home. Large portions have made their way into many kitchens, leaving more opportunities for food waste. Use smaller plates when you prepare food at home, and then save the leftovers for later. If you notice that you are constantly making too much food, cut down your recipes. Ignore expiration dates Expiration dates contribute to tons of wasted food each year, but you might be surprised to learn that expiration dates on food mean absolutely nothing to consumers. Except for baby food, expiration dates, sell-by dates, guaranteed fresh dates and use-by dates are all used by manufacturers and have nothing to do with government regulation or any kind of set standard. This means that a lot of food isn’t spoiled, even though it has gone past the expiration date. Trust your senses of smell, sight and taste. Unless the food has obviously spoiled, don’t be so quick to throw it out. Most people don’t realize just how much food they throw away on a daily basis. By taking just a few easy steps, you can reduce your food waste , make a major impact and help conserve resources for future generations. Via Mashable , Time and Stop Food Waste Images via Shutterstock

Go here to see the original: 
5 simple ways to reduce your food waste right now

Starbucks unveils store built from 29 recycled shipping containers in Taiwan

October 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Starbucks unveils store built from 29 recycled shipping containers in Taiwan

Starbucks Taiwan will debut its first Asia Pacific store that is built from recycled shipping containers in the Hualien Bay Mall. The mall has yet to be opened to the public, but it is situated in a touristic area of the city that is well known for its cuisine and features breathtaking views of the Pacific Ocean and neighboring mountains. The store spans two stories totaling 320 square meters (approximately 3,445 square feet) and features comfortable seating areas where guests are invited to congregate over a cup of Starbucks’ finest. Starbucks is the first retailer to claim space in the newly built mall. It does so using 29 shipping containers that have been refashioned by famous Japanese architect, Kengo Kuma, who has his name signed to two Starbucks store designs already: the Fukuoka branch in Japan and the upcoming Starbucks Reserve Roastery in Tokyo. Related: Starbucks ditches plastic straws for the environment Inspired by a combination of Chinese architecture and nature, the Taiwan edition receives patrons under traditional bucket arches connoting the overhanging foliage of coffee trees . Inside, the store features warm decor and a comfortable seating area spanning two stories that Kuma decided to stack, creating a much taller space that allows for natural sunlight to enter through skylights installed throughout. These skylights illuminate a brightly illustrated mural at one end of the store, designed as a tribute to the vibrant Hualien culture. The wall mural tames the geometric roughness of the cargo containers, creating a sociable space alongside aboriginal Amis figures whose heritage run deep within the city’s culture. At the other end of the store, visitors are invited to enjoy the beautiful mountain landscape that forms a picturesque backdrop to the port city. Related: A disused railway will become a sustainable green corridor in Taiwan The project is part of Starbucks’ recently announced “Starbucks Greener Stores.” The initiative is aimed at building sustainable stores, which will be designed and operated using reclaimed materials . The Taiwan store joins a suite of locations also built from shipping containers, 45 of which can be found in the U.S. already. The Seattle coffee-chain prefabricates the models offsite before delivery, allowing the company to occupy spaces not necessarily designed for traditional stores. By avoiding the damaging environmental effects generally output on building sites, Starbucks is committed to minimizing its environmental footprint. + Starbucks Images via Starbucks

Continued here:
Starbucks unveils store built from 29 recycled shipping containers in Taiwan

How to Store Water for Emergencies

March 21, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on How to Store Water for Emergencies

Welcome to Water Wednesdays, our series on everything you need … The post How to Store Water for Emergencies appeared first on Earth911.com.

Here is the original:
How to Store Water for Emergencies

Amazon, Walgreens take baby steps on chemical safety

December 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Amazon, Walgreens take baby steps on chemical safety

They and other retailers still lag on transparency, but there are meaningful signs of change chronicled in the latest Mind the Store report.

Read the original post:
Amazon, Walgreens take baby steps on chemical safety

The free grocery store fighting food waste and hunger

September 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The free grocery store fighting food waste and hunger

The Free Store, a non-profit organization and grocery store based in Wellington, New Zealand, is serving food for free and aiding in the fight against food waste . Originally started as a two-week-long art project by artist Kim Paton in 2010, the store has now grown into a more permanent institution, stocking its shelves with surplus food from bakeries and supermarkets. In redistributing free food that would otherwise have gone to waste, the Free Store has proven to be a valuable community space. “There are no conditions on who can come to The Free Store,” said co-founder and director Benjamin Johnson. “There are no criteria. Anybody can come for whatever reason and take whatever they want.” Food waste is a major social problem in New Zealand , as it is in much of the industrialized world. Kiwis, or residents of New Zealand, dispose of approximately $625 million worth of food (120,000 tons) each year. Globally, it is estimated that total food waste weighs up to 1.3 billion tons. Meanwhile, people still go hungry. “We saw the potential in an untapped food supply. You had food that was perfectly good to eat, and then you had people that were hungry . We could facilitate a connection between the two,” said Johnson. Related: Britain’s first zero-waste store is packaging-free and only sells ethical goods The Free Store is made possible through support from volunteers , donors, and around 65 suppliers, located around Wellington city center eager to put their surplus food to good use. According to Johnson, the Free Store distributes between 800 to 1,500 food items each weeknight between 6 PM and 7 PM, averaging about 250,000 food items; that amounts to $1 million worth of food saved per year. Since its establishment, the Free Store has spread to four locations throughout New Zealand, adapting their model and funding structure to fit each area. “All you need is a space to operate from, surplus food, people who need the food and will come and take it, volunteers, and a committed group of people who can actually do it,” said Johnson. “There has to be local ownership. In every area where there’s a Free Store, there needs to be a deeply rooted community of people.” + The Free Store Via EcoWatch Images via The Free Store

Read more: 
The free grocery store fighting food waste and hunger

New NASA discovery hints at water elsewhere in the solar system

September 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New NASA discovery hints at water elsewhere in the solar system

The presence of water on Earth used to help set our planet apart from others, but not anymore. NASA researchers recently uncovered evidence of water on Vesta, the second biggest body in the asteroid belt between Jupiter and Mars . Essam Heggy of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory told Inverse, “The more we search, the more we find ice and water in the solar system, and the more we realize water is not unique to our planet.” Recent discoveries – like that of water on Mars or hints of water on TRAPPIST-1 planets – have us questioning what we thought we knew about H2O in the solar system. It’s likely found on the dwarf planet Ceres and the moons Europa and Enceladus, too. Researchers used information from NASA’s Dawn mission , which explored Vesta between 2011 and 2012, to uncover the best evidence for water on the large asteroid we’ve found yet. Related: Scientists just discovered snow on Mars Led by Elizabeth Palmer of Western Michigan University , three researchers scrutinized the Dawn data. The probe discovered regions that were unusually smooth; the researchers think the surface variations weren’t only the result of cratering processes, like on the Moon, connecting them with high hydrogen concentrations, strongly suggesting Vesta is home to ground ice. Heggy, who was part of the research, said Vesta was once thought to be a dry body. These findings suggest we were probably wrong about that. The presence of ice in an asteroid belt opens up intriguing possibilities, since asteroids can easily be knocked out of their orbits to other areas of the solar system. Heggy said comets transport water molecules throughout solar systems. Could asteroids play a role in transporting water too? Even if that’s true, Heggy said it’s too early to guess how they might have impacted Earth’s water supply during its primordial days. The journal Nature Communications published the research online yesterday. Via Inverse Images via NASA/JPL-Caltech ( 1 , 2 )

Original post:
New NASA discovery hints at water elsewhere in the solar system

First newly-developed chocolate in 80 years is made from Ruby cocoa beans

September 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on First newly-developed chocolate in 80 years is made from Ruby cocoa beans

Chocolate aficionados rejoice! There’s a new version of your favorite velvety treat, and it’s ruby red in color. Made from the Ruby cocoa bean, the newly-invented variety of chocolate is the first to be developed in 80 years — since white chocolate was introduced to the world. And though we haven’t tried it ourselves, apparently it has a fruity and slightly sour flavor. The new chocolate was recently unveiled in Shanghai, China by Swiss chocolate producer Barry Callebaut . MNN reports the company spent 13 years developing the treat and describes it as a “tension between berry-fruitiness and luscious smoothness.” It’s “an intense sensorial delight,” says the company. Part of the chocolate’s appeal is its unique color, a result of the Ruby cocoa bean’s pigment. The product is all natural and is made using an “innovative process” that unlocks the bean’s unique flavor and color. Barry Callebaut says no berries, berry flavor or any color is added to the chocolate. Related: HOW TO: Make delicious, raw chocolate pudding from avocados! This is the #rubychocolate that everyone is on about. Taste is like white choc w/ berry fruits – but all from bean… pic.twitter.com/NqGs90Lmda — Andrew Baker (@ccAndrewBaker) September 5, 2017 Unfortunately, it will be at least six months until you can try the ruby chocolate for yourself since Callebaut only makes the chocolate, and not the consumer products that would go with it. Raphael Warmth wrote on the company’s Facebook page : “So far you cannot buy the ruby chocolate. This very much depends on our customers when ruby chocolate will be available … as we are a B2B company and selling ruby chocolate to food manufacturers. Usually, it takes from 6 up to 18 months until an innovation from our side hits the retail shelves.” Judging by the gleeful reactions of people taste-testing the ruby chocolate in the video below, it will be worth the wait. + Barry Callebaut Via MNN Images via  Barry Callebaut

Read the original here:
First newly-developed chocolate in 80 years is made from Ruby cocoa beans

How Far Would You Go to Avoid a Plastic Bag Fee?

October 31, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on How Far Would You Go to Avoid a Plastic Bag Fee?

Whether you’re for or against plastic bag bans that come with mandatory fees for picking up a paper or plastic bag from the store, one thing is clear — some people will do anything they can to get out of that fee. And we mean anything. Even though…

See original here:
How Far Would You Go to Avoid a Plastic Bag Fee?

UK opens its first ‘pay-as-you-feel’ food waste grocery store

September 22, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on UK opens its first ‘pay-as-you-feel’ food waste grocery store

The first food waste grocery store in the United Kingdom has opened, operating on a “pay-as-you-feel” model to help people on tight budgets obtain vital nutrition for their families. The Real Junk Food Project opened the store in Pudsey, near Leeds, and the warehouse is full of many of the same products found in regular supermarkets, except that they are closer to their expiration dates or have dinged or dented packaging. For whatever price they can afford, people can buy fresh pasta, juice, pasta sauce, fruit, vegetables, and even desserts. Globally, more than 1.3 billion metric tons of food is wasted or spoiled each year and some 795 million people lack regular access to healthy food. Finding ways to divert some of that food waste into hungry mouths has both environmental and public health benefits, so these so-called “food waste supermarkets” are a growing trend. The Real Junk Food Project opened the UK’s first such store after its success with a number of pay-as-you-feel cafes around the UK serving freshly prepared meals made from food destined to be wasted. Related: 400 million meals are wasted every year in the UK alone Since the store’s initial opening on August 29, staff of the Real Junk Food Project have attempted to operate the food waste supermarket (which is awaiting an official name) seven days a week (based on availability) to make food as accessible as possible to the local community. The organizers partner with other local nonprofits working to “rescue” food from the waste stream, stocking the warehouse shelves with all sorts of fresh foods that don’t quite meet the standards of regular grocery stores but are still perfectly suitable for consumption. This is the first such store in the UK, but it echoes similar programs elsewhere in Europe, such as Denmark’s WeFood , which started selling expired food products earlier this year in an effort to reduce food waste and connect people with affordable food. Via The Independent Images via The Real Junk Food Project

Go here to see the original:
UK opens its first ‘pay-as-you-feel’ food waste grocery store

Green Grocery: How To Shop To Support The Environment

May 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Green Grocery: How To Shop To Support The Environment

When my husband and I started working at an independently owned natural foods store in 2012, we never imagined that we would soon be running the show. Last year the owner decided to sell the store and chose Ryan (my husband) to take over her role,…

Continued here:
Green Grocery: How To Shop To Support The Environment

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1304 access attempts in the last 7 days.