Foster + Partners-designed Apple Store glows like a paper lantern in Macau

July 10, 2018 by  
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Foster + Partners has unveiled a new Apple Store in Macau  — and it’s very different from the all-glass buildings we’ve come to expect from the company. In response to the hustle and bustle of the port city known as the “Las Vegas of Asia,” the British international architecture studio crafted Apple Cotai Central as an oasis of calm housed in a glowing cube surrounded by bamboo. Instead of the Apple brand’s iconic full-height glazing, the architects applied a “first-of-its-kind” glass-stone composite facade that appears to glow from within. Located in the Sands Cotai Central resort, the Apple Cotai Central store opened late last month and is the second Apple store in Macau. Foster + Partners created the design in collaboration with the Apple design team led by chief design officer Sir Jonathan Ive as well as with senior vice presidency of Retail and Online Stores Angela Ahrendts. The new store continues Apple’s embrace of POPS (privately owned public spaces) in that the grounds also include a large new event plaza nestled within a bamboo forest. “We wanted to create something very simple and pure — a beautiful and elegant building that complements the sounds, sights and colors of Macau, while embodying a sense of clarity and quietude,” said Stefan Behling, Head of Studio at Foster + Partners. “The design creates two distinct spaces, one inside and one outside, imbued with a sense of authentic beauty arising from the innovative use of natural materials .” Related: Foster + Partners’ Apple Park Visitor Center opens to the public The Apple Cotai Centra gets its “paper lantern” effect from the glass-stone composite facade made up of extremely thin layers of stone attached to five layers of glass, which creates the effect of translucent stone walls evocative of stained glass. To achieve a sense of lightness, the structural frame is only supported on three corner columns clad in mirrored stainless steel. The airy interior features a glazed facade with a skylit central atrium surrounded by bamboo. A pair of grand stone staircases leads to the upper level that is also flooded with natural light. + Foster + Partners Images by Nigel Young/Foster+Partners

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Foster + Partners-designed Apple Store glows like a paper lantern in Macau

This contemporary light-filled home feels like an extension of Balis tropics

June 29, 2018 by  
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German architect Alexis Dornier of his eponymous Bali-based architecture practice recently completed a stunning modern home in an Indonesian tropical paradise. The private home — named House A — comprises four stories laid out over 8,072 square feet. Like the firm’s previous works, House A embraces indoor-outdoor living with full-height glazing and an open layout where views of lush greenery can be enjoyed at every turn. Built primarily of stone and dark timber, House A appears to be a natural extension of its evergreen surroundings in Mas, a village renowned for its hand-carved wood sculpture south of Ubud, Bali . This emphasis on the outdoors is carried through the color palette, from the neutral off-white textiles to the moss-green upholstery. Large potted plants are also bring the outdoors into the home. Metallic accents, clean lines and high-end fixtures from the likes of Grohe and Toto give the house its contemporary edge, while clear glass rooftops allow light to filter deep into the home. “The linear four-story arrangement counteracts the steep slope of the site by becoming a bridge house,” the firm said in a project statement. “The central theme of the ensemble is combining two architectural expressions: the idea of a romantic ruin, strongly connected to the ground and a light, fading, transparent structure holding a series of roofs; two images working with and against each other. The master deck is crowning the structure, continuing through a double-height exterior living space. The silhouette is a sequence of five roofs of different lengths. Linear skylights and linear gaps between the roofs complete a play of bar code like light play, changing as the sun is making its way from east to west.” Related: An ever-evolving, growing home in Indonesia adapts to its owners’ needs The guest bedrooms are located on the lower levels of the house, while the main living spaces like the kitchen and double-height dining room are placed on the third floor. The en suite master bedroom can be found on the top floor. + Alexis Dornier Images via Alexis Dornier

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This contemporary light-filled home feels like an extension of Balis tropics

Sculptural open-air pavilion blends into a rocky Norwegian landscape

June 29, 2018 by  
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When Oslo-based design studio MORFEUS arkitekter first laid eyes on Bukkekjerka, a rock formation framed by the rugged mountains on the east and the open sea to the west, its natural beauty stunned them. So, when they were tasked with designing an open-air pavilion on the site along the Norwegian Scenic Route Andøya, they understandably wanted to take a sensitive approach so as not to detract from the landscape. The resulting design is a contemporary structure built from folded concrete to mimic the surrounding jagged mountain peaks. Spanning an area of 2,800 square feet, the Bukkekjerka rest station comprises a series of structures spread out across the landscape. The parking and service facilities are placed in the north, while a freestanding bench in the mountains is oriented for views of the midnight sun. Picnic areas and a footbridge trace a path toward the lighthouses to the east. Consecrated land and unique geological formations can be found in the south, which MORFEUS arkitekter has designed for use as an annual open-air church for weddings and other gatherings. “Our hope is that these elements are unveiled and experienced gradually, encouraging further exploration and experience of the inherent qualities of the place,” explains Caroline Støvring and Cecilie Wille of MORFEUS arkitekter. “The built elements are adapted to the existing terrain, not the other way around. We have wanted to proceed carefully, but also with a boldness that echoes the surrounding landscape. We have desired the project to appear more like landscape and sculptural elements, less like a building.” Related: Off-grid Fossil Discovery Exhibit camouflages into the Texan desert The majority of the structures are open-air; however, even the service building with toilets manages to embrace the landscape with one-way mirrored glass cladding. The glass allows visitors inside the building to enjoy views over the sea and the mountain peaks in the north, while the mirrored side helps blend the building into the landscape. The building is also constructed from polished, acid-resistant steel with a mirror-like shine. + MORFEUS arkitekter Images ©MORFEUS Støvring Wille

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Sculptural open-air pavilion blends into a rocky Norwegian landscape

An old London chapel is reborn into a modern home and artist studio

June 19, 2018 by  
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UK architect Alexander Nikjoo has breathed new life into a Victorian chapel by transforming it into a contemporary home and studio for an artist. Located in Deptford in South London, the renovation has streamlined the look of the former chapel with a fresh coat of paint and a minimalist material palette. The interior was refreshed to feel bright and airy with plenty of natural light. Although the old chapel was already being used as a studio space by the time Nikjoo was approached for the project, it was dark and uninviting. In transforming the building, the architect kept the layout and several architectural features intact, such as the exposed roof trusses. “The building was stripped back to its original form revealing features and details that had been covered through years of piecemeal extensions and additions,” Nikjoo said. “Restored using a palette of rich yet simple materials, the new interventions interweave with the existing fabric of the building.” In contrast to the black exterior, the interior is filled with light-colored materials — including oak, birch plywood , oiled pine, stone and polished concrete floors — that help create a welcoming atmosphere. Skylights and windows bring in copious amounts of natural light, while the tall ceiling brings the view upward toward the new mezzanine built with birch plywood railings. Related: Stunning chapel in Japan brings a fractal forest indoors The former nave now houses the open-plan living area, dining room and kitchen that are positioned linearly from the entrance. The stairs to the mezzanine level, which opens up to a flat roof terrace, are located behind the kitchen. The master suite and two guest bedrooms with a shared bathroom are tucked away in the rear of the home where the vestry once was. Storage is discreetly hidden away behind wooden doors to maintain the minimalist aesthetic. + Nikjoo Via Dezeen Images by Nikjoo

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An old London chapel is reborn into a modern home and artist studio

Bro Ole Scheeren completes art museum near Beijings Forbidden City

January 24, 2018 by  
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Büro Ole Scheeren recently completed Guardian Art Center, a contemporary art museum heralded as the “world’s first ever custom-built auction house.” Located close to Beijing’s historic Forbidden City, this hybrid cultural institution offers mixed-use programming from galleries and conservation facilities to a hotel, restaurants, events spaces, and even integrated public transport infrastructure. Designed to respect Beijing’s traditional urban fabric, Guardian Art Center comprises a series of nested gray basalt stone volumes at its base that echo the scale and materiality of the nearby hutong courtyard houses. The stone volumes are perforated with a varying circular pattern that lets in natural light and glows at night. A “floating glass ring” rests atop the stone base and is clad in a brick-patterned glass facade. “The Guardian Art Center is a lot more than just a museum ,” says Ole Scheeren, principal of Büro Ole Scheeren. “It’s not a hermetic institution, but rather an acknowledgement of the hybrid state of contemporary culture. It is a Chinese puzzle of interlocking cultural spaces and public functions that fuse art and culture with events and lifestyle.” Scheeren adds that the materials share symbolic value with the brick referring to the common people and adjacent hutongs, while the glass references the contemporary city. Related: Ole Scheeren unveils designs for a stunning “sky forest” in Vietnam The building occupies prime location at the intersection of Wangfujing, Beijing’s most famous shopping street, and Wusi Davie, and also sits opposite the National Art Museum of China. Given the site’s historical significance as the place where China’s New Cultural Movement originated, the designs for Guardian Art Center took two decades before passing approval by the Beijing planning bureau and preservation commission. In addition to its ties to both modern and historic design, the large structure can adapt to multiple uses thanks to moveable partitions and ceiling systems that allow for different interior configurations. + Büro Ole Scheeren Images by Buro OS and Iwan Baan

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Bro Ole Scheeren completes art museum near Beijings Forbidden City

Minimalist Revugia retreat is nestled amidst Germany’s Black Forest

December 15, 2017 by  
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Revugia is new wilderness retreat designed for Germany’s Black Forest and Harz Mountains. It consists of a series of beautiful cabins and treehouses designed to have minimal impact upon the environment. Designed by architect Matthias Arndt, founder of lichtecht , for German developer TIDEVAND Bau , the resort will be built using wood, natural stone and glass. The Revugia resort will offer 50 suites in the main building and over 30 additional lodgings spread throughout the forest. Its architectural style champions simplicity and minimalist forms so as not to draw attention away from nature. Related: Inflatable spiky pinecone-shaped roofs top this forest resort in Latvia Revugia will offer spaces for recreation as well as venues for corporate events, meetings, presentations and seminars. It is expected to break ground in the second half of 2018, and is slated to open near the end of 2019. + Lichtecht + TIDEVAND Bau Via Fubiz Images by lichtecht

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Minimalist Revugia retreat is nestled amidst Germany’s Black Forest

Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

October 27, 2017 by  
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This hidden retreat in Amacueca, México  is a daylit getaway surrounded by lush walnut groves and forests. CoA arquitectura and Departamento de Arquitectura designed Casa Amacueca using primarily stone and timber , to create a serene escape that fits perfectly into its natural setting. The layout of the house radiates from the central courtyard which allows more natural light to penetrate the interior. Slender timber columns frame a beautiful walkway that offers a visual connection between the living spaces and nature. Related: Eco Hotel Endemico is a Gorgeous Green Retreat in Baja, Mexico The columns support the wooden frames that comprise the roof, while concrete appears only as grafts in the supporting walls as elements that limit, support and confine windows and niches. A deck sheltered under a gable roof follows the outline of the building and its radial wooden “armor”. + CoA arquitectura + Departamento de Arquitectura Via Plataforma Arquitectura Lead photo by Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrin

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Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

October 27, 2017 by  
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This hidden retreat in Amacueca, México  is a daylit getaway surrounded by lush walnut groves and forests. CoA arquitectura and Departamento de Arquitectura designed Casa Amacueca using primarily stone and timber , to create a serene escape that fits perfectly into its natural setting. The layout of the house radiates from the central courtyard which allows more natural light to penetrate the interior. Slender timber columns frame a beautiful walkway that offers a visual connection between the living spaces and nature. Related: Eco Hotel Endemico is a Gorgeous Green Retreat in Baja, Mexico The columns support the wooden frames that comprise the roof, while concrete appears only as grafts in the supporting walls as elements that limit, support and confine windows and niches. A deck sheltered under a gable roof follows the outline of the building and its radial wooden “armor”. + CoA arquitectura + Departamento de Arquitectura Via Plataforma Arquitectura Lead photo by Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrin

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Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

October 27, 2017 by  
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This hidden retreat in Amacueca, México  is a daylit getaway surrounded by lush walnut groves and forests. CoA arquitectura and Departamento de Arquitectura designed Casa Amacueca using primarily stone and timber , to create a serene escape that fits perfectly into its natural setting. The layout of the house radiates from the central courtyard which allows more natural light to penetrate the interior. Slender timber columns frame a beautiful walkway that offers a visual connection between the living spaces and nature. Related: Eco Hotel Endemico is a Gorgeous Green Retreat in Baja, Mexico The columns support the wooden frames that comprise the roof, while concrete appears only as grafts in the supporting walls as elements that limit, support and confine windows and niches. A deck sheltered under a gable roof follows the outline of the building and its radial wooden “armor”. + CoA arquitectura + Departamento de Arquitectura Via Plataforma Arquitectura Lead photo by Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrin

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Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

October 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

This hidden retreat in Amacueca, México  is a daylit getaway surrounded by lush walnut groves and forests. CoA arquitectura and Departamento de Arquitectura designed Casa Amacueca using primarily stone and timber , to create a serene escape that fits perfectly into its natural setting. The layout of the house radiates from the central courtyard which allows more natural light to penetrate the interior. Slender timber columns frame a beautiful walkway that offers a visual connection between the living spaces and nature. Related: Eco Hotel Endemico is a Gorgeous Green Retreat in Baja, Mexico The columns support the wooden frames that comprise the roof, while concrete appears only as grafts in the supporting walls as elements that limit, support and confine windows and niches. A deck sheltered under a gable roof follows the outline of the building and its radial wooden “armor”. + CoA arquitectura + Departamento de Arquitectura Via Plataforma Arquitectura Lead photo by Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrin

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Daylit retreat in Mexico fits perfectly into the surrounding walnut groves

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