Earth911 Podcast: Steve Melink on a Realistic Conservative Climate Strategy

November 11, 2020 by  
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Author and entrepreneur Steve Melink joins Earth911 to talk about … The post Earth911 Podcast: Steve Melink on a Realistic Conservative Climate Strategy appeared first on Earth 911.

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Earth911 Podcast: Steve Melink on a Realistic Conservative Climate Strategy

Earth911 Podcast: Steve Nygren, Founder of Eco-community Serenbe

December 30, 2019 by  
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Serenbe is an ecologically responsible 1,000-acre community in the Chattahoochee … The post Earth911 Podcast: Steve Nygren, Founder of Eco-community Serenbe appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Podcast: Steve Nygren, Founder of Eco-community Serenbe

What You Need to Know About Renewable Energy

December 30, 2019 by  
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After a century of growth — and destruction — powered … The post What You Need to Know About Renewable Energy appeared first on Earth911.com.

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What You Need to Know About Renewable Energy

The last straw: How Pizza Hut is cutting plastic waste

July 10, 2018 by  
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Swapping plastic straws for paper straws was not a straightforward decision, head of supply chain Steve Packer explains.

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The last straw: How Pizza Hut is cutting plastic waste

Firefighter’s self-built tiny house is an earthship on wheels

December 19, 2017 by  
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When he’s not putting out fires in Edmonton, Canada, firefighter Steve has managed to find time to build an Earthship-inspired tiny home on wheels. The 140-square-foot home , which can easily go off-grid, has all the comforts of a traditional residence – including a queen size bed, a deck and even a mini vertical herb garden in the kitchen. And of course, it was built to meet building codes for fire safety. Steve built his little shelter after taking a one-year sabbatical, during which time he traveled via campervan , volunteering on many tiny ship builds along the way. Having honed his building skills, he came back to Edmonton to construct his own earthship-inspired tiny home. Located in a the backyard of a home that he rents out, the compact dwelling was recently featured by Living Big in a Tiny House . Related: Architect builds a tiny studio in his backyard to be closer to his child The entrance to Steve’s home is via an open-air wooden deck that’s a perfect space for reading or bbq-ing. The interior living space is bordered with seating and storage cubbies on the wall. This main room doubles as the bedroom when the pull-out queen bed that’s hidden under the kitchen platform is rolled out. The kitchen is definitely designed for someone who has a love of all things culinary. The L-shaped layout makes for an ultra-efficient space and easy movement. A wall of vertical shelving has ample space for basic condiments as well as space to grow herbs , although Steve admit to killing most of them. The floor of the tiny home is brick, which was Steve’s attempt at creating a high thermal mass for passive heating. However, he’s planning to replace the flooring with wooden panels because the brick’s heat isn’t faring well against the cold Canadian winters. However, the home is still well-heated thanks to the three different heating options: woodstove, propane heater or electric patio heater. During the design process, Steve wanted to make the home as off-grid as possible. Now, it sits in the backyard and uses the utilities from the main house, but the idea was to have a roaming independent space. The main structure is built on wheels and hot water is provided by a propane-powered water heater. For extra sustainability, there is an incinerating toilet in the bathroom. When asked about his inspiration to build the tiny home , the firefighter explained it’s all about financial practicality, “For me, it was how the economics of it make sense. I rent the big house out and the tenants pay the mortgage, so by me staying in the small house in the backyard, I’m living a mortgage-free lifestyle right now, immediately, while I’m still collecting equity in the main house. So that makes sense to me and that’s a good situation to be in.” Via Treehugger Video and images via Living Big in a Tiny House

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Firefighter’s self-built tiny house is an earthship on wheels

Floating solar rig from Columbia University harvests hydrogen fuel from seawater

December 19, 2017 by  
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Engineers at Columbia University have created a “solar fuels rig,” which floats on the ocean, captures solar energy, then uses that energy to extract hydrogen from seawater. Hydrogen is a clean source of energy, though methods to extract it have often proven too costly or energy intensive to be viable. A typical hydrogen extraction system uses water electrolysis, in which H2 and O2 are separated by sending an electric current through water and divided by a membrane, which is usually very delicate. The new floating solar rig does not use a membrane, which makes it resilient enough to deploy on the open ocean . The lack of a membrane is an important design feature that facilitates a more effective extraction system. “Being able to safely demonstrate a device that can perform electrolysis without a membrane brings us another step closer to making seawater electrolysis possible,” said Jack Davis, co-author of a scientific paper on the device published in the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy . “These solar fuels generators are essentially artificial photosynthesis systems, doing the same thing that plants do with photosynthesis, so our device may open up all kinds of opportunities to generate clean, renewable energy .” Related: Affordable new device uses solar energy to produce hydrogen and electricity Rather than incorporate a membrane, the device uses an asymmetrical mesh structure in which electrodes, coated with a catalyst on one side, collect bubbles of either hydrogen or oxygen. Once the bubbles are large enough, they are pulled into separate collection chambers. Although the team has yet to test its design on actual seawater, they feel confident in the process. “We are especially excited about the potential of solar fuels technologies because of the tremendous amount of solar energy that is available,” said Daniel Esposito, lead researcher on the project. “Our challenge is to find scalable and economical technologies that convert sunlight into a useful form of energy that can also be stored for times when the sun is not shining.” Via New Atlas Images via Jack Davis/Columbia University, Justin Bui/Columbia University and Daniel Esposito/Columbia University

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Floating solar rig from Columbia University harvests hydrogen fuel from seawater

Unexpected giant spikes and other oddities take over a Scottish mansion grounds

July 27, 2017 by  
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A curious sight has taken over one of Scotland’s finest historic grounds. Environmental artist Steve Messam crafted XXX, a series of site-specific installations that add modern whimsy to the late 18th-century Mellerstain House & Gardens . Commissioned as the first works of the newly opened Borders Sculpture Park, the giant inflatable artworks create dialogue between the past and present, from the enormous roof of spikes atop a decrepit gatehouse to the floating white spheres on a lake. Messam’s XXX installation comprises three works, all of which are large-scale and made from inflated white fabric that reference the marble sculptures originally intended to decorate the Mellerstain grounds. Each site-specific intervention uses the element of surprise to disrupt the way viewers typically perceive the historic landscape. A fine day to be a punk cottage. ('Pointed' by Steve Messam) #mellerstain #art #environmentalart #scotland #cottage #punk #spikes #archifringe #installation #inflatables #scottishborders #scottishart #creativescotland #startups #borderssculpturepark @rougeit A post shared by Borders Sculpture Park (@borderssculpturepark) on Jul 22, 2017 at 12:19pm PDT ‘Scattered,’ which comprises two to four-meter-wide inflated white spheres that bob along a lake, can be immediately seen and explored up close in canoes. In contrast, ‘Pointed’ and ‘Towered’ are placed within hidden, partially ruined buildings and must be discovered on a walk through the grounds. In Pointed, 28 giant inflated white spikes make up the re-imagined roofline of a former gatehouse. In contrast, Towered takes the shape of column-like forms that emerge from atop an old laundry ruin. Related: Artist Steve Messam built a 16-foot paper bridge without glue or bolts A statement on Steve Messam’s website reads: “Messam’s fascinating site-specific works explore a sense of space, presence and place, each one working with the surrounding environment to disrupt and transform the way we perceive it. By integrating inflatable, fabric sculptures very directly into the buildings and landscape, the artist seeks to uncover some of the many layers of narrative bound up in this magnificent estate. Creating a true visual spectacle, the three works are joyful and uplifting. They are celebrations of form rather than being symbolic or having inherent meaning, and have to be directly experienced in the environment to be appreciated fully.” + Steve Messam Via Colossal Images via Borders Sculpture Park

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Unexpected giant spikes and other oddities take over a Scottish mansion grounds

Silicon Valley’s ‘smartest guy’ on deep learning and sustainability

October 6, 2015 by  
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Venture capital legend Steve Jurvetson is “as excited as ever” about transforming industries focusing on the planet’s biggest challenges.

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Silicon Valley’s ‘smartest guy’ on deep learning and sustainability

Amazon, GE and the ‘geniuses’ reshaping sustainability

October 6, 2015 by  
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From sustainability hires and promotions at large companies to a fresh crop of foundation fellows focused on systemic change, fall is off to a frenetic start.

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Amazon, GE and the ‘geniuses’ reshaping sustainability

Steve Jobs (and Many Other Tech Execs) Believed in Low-Tech Parenting

September 13, 2014 by  
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You might assume that Steve Jobs raised his kids with an iPad in each hand and a Mac computer in every room, but the technology giant was actually surprisingly analog when it came to raising his kids. In 2010, while being interviewed by Nick Bilton, Jobs revealed that he didn’t know what his kids thought of the iPad because his kids had actually never used them. And surprisingly, Jobs isn’t alone among technology executives. Read More >  Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: analog parenting , Apple iPad , Apple iPad used by kids , iPad for children , iPad use children , low tech children , Low tech parenting , low tech play , Steve Jobs , Steve Jobs iPad , Steve Jobs kids , Steve Jobs low tech , Steve Jobs parenting

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Steve Jobs (and Many Other Tech Execs) Believed in Low-Tech Parenting

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