Just before he died, Stephen Hawking predicted the ‘end of the universe’

March 19, 2018 by  
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Just before he died, Stephen Hawking was working on a groundbreaking study that predicted the end of the world and sought to prove the multiverse theory. His co-author Professor Thomas Hertog, of KU Leuven University in Belgium, says that the work is so important that Hawking could have received a Nobel Prize had he not passed away last week . Hawking’s paper, titled “A Smooth Exit From Eternal Inflation,” looks at ways in which humans could identify parallel universes – known as the multiverse theory – using probes on spaceships. It also theorizes about the end of the universe, saying that it will end as the stars run out of energy. Related: Beloved physicist Stephen Hawking passes away at 76 The paper is currently being reviewed by a leading scientific journal, and while it will no doubt contribute to our understanding of the world around us, sadly, Hawking can’t win a Nobel Prize for his work. “He has often been nominated for the Nobel and should have won it. Now he never can,” Prof Hertog told The Sunday Times . Via The Independent an CNBC Images via Wikimedia and Flickr  under CC license

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Just before he died, Stephen Hawking predicted the ‘end of the universe’

Agtech start-up Plenty plans to grow hydroponic peaches

March 19, 2018 by  
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San Francisco -based start-up Plenty is expanding the possibilities of what can be grown on indoor farms, with its sights set on peaches. Plenty uses a hydroponic growing system, which feeds crops through a steady flow of nutrient-rich water, to grow high-quality, local produce. This kind of system is typically used to grow annual crops, not perennial trees like peaches. Nonetheless, Plenty’s success has the company confident that it can break new ground. “[Plenty’s kale] is nothing like the tough, bitter leaf we’re used to,” Plenty CEO  Matt Barnard proudly stated to Wired . “It’s sweet and velvety. People say we should find another name for it.” Plenty grows its crops indoors thanks to light supplies by LEDs and vertically-aligned growing spaces. This allows for greater crop density, which best serves the urban environment in which Plenty farms. In addition to its environmental benefits, Plenty’s local harvest tastes better too. “Right now, produce often has to travel 3,000 miles from the farm to consumer,” said Barnard, “which is why so many farms grow iceberg lettuce , which tastes of nothing. Our salads are spicy and citrusy and sweet at the same time. People are amazed they can eat it without salad dressing.” Related: 6 places where soil-less farming is revolutionizing how we grow food The primary obstacle to greater success for operations like Plenty is cost. “Anyone can buy some shelves, some lights, irrigation,” said Barnard. “The challenge is to get your produce down from $40 per pound to $1. At the moment, for example, we have an expensive peach.” Plenty plans to incorporate data and machine learning capabilities into the system, so as to allow for algorithmic alterations based on plant needs. “Now we are having what I like to [call] a ‘Google moment,’” explained Barnard. “Just like Google benefited from the simultaneous combination of improved technology, better algorithms and masses of data, we are seeing the same.” Via Wired Images via Plenty and Depositphotos

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Agtech start-up Plenty plans to grow hydroponic peaches

How an urban school’s gardening project healed a community

July 29, 2017 by  
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Teacher Stephen Ritz transformed a school’s lunch program by getting kids involved in community gardening — as well as nurturing their hearts and minds.

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How an urban school’s gardening project healed a community

Stephen Shaheen Fashions Stunning Furniture With Salvaged Onyx

February 18, 2013 by  
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Stephen Shaheen creates intriguing designs from discarded remnants of onyx left over from industrial stone fabrication. No stranger to upcycling, Shaheen uses these upcycled materials to create spectacular sculptural furnishings that resemble illuminated stacks in the form of a pyramid. The designs vary depending on the scrap materials Shaheen uses. The inventive Eistla series is crafted from onyx, while his Lou P. chair feature is a work made from 22 layers of Italian botticino marble. But while the materials differ, the central idea of utilizing all the wonderful salvaged remains of beautiful stone blocks remains the same. Read the rest of Stephen Shaheen Fashions Stunning Furniture With Salvaged Onyx Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green furniture” , eco design , green design , salvaged materials , scrap materials , sculpture , stephen shaheen , sustainable design , upcycled materials

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Stephen Shaheen Fashions Stunning Furniture With Salvaged Onyx

Artist Stephen Williams Creates a Quirky Bike from Two Antique Locked Gates

November 18, 2011 by  
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This unexpected locked-gate bicycle is an awesome invention by artist Stephen Williams . As fanciful as it is fun, the bike is sculpted from a bizarre combination of objects that give a couple of old gates a more mobile lifestyle. Imagine how much attention you’d get cycling this mad machine down the street! Read the rest of Artist Stephen Williams Creates a Quirky Bike from Two Antique Locked Gates Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bicycle art , inventive bicycles , locked gate bicycle , saatchi art , stephen williams , weird art

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Artist Stephen Williams Creates a Quirky Bike from Two Antique Locked Gates

OFF Architecture’s Terraced Green Roofed Apartments To Add Landscaping to Anglet France

November 18, 2011 by  
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Read the rest of OFF Architecture’s Terraced Green Roofed Apartments To Add Landscaping to Anglet France Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Anglet , eco design , france , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green roof , green roofed apartment complex , off architecture , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , terraced green roof

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OFF Architecture’s Terraced Green Roofed Apartments To Add Landscaping to Anglet France

Spanish Cabezo de la Almagra Museum and Archeological Park Rises from the Ruins

November 18, 2011 by  
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Read the rest of Spanish Cabezo de la Almagra Museum and Archeological Park Rises from the Ruins Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: archeological site , Architecture , city views , green materials , huelva , huelva university , Landscape Architecture , minimal architecture , Museum , natural light , recycled weathering steel , rust , spanish design

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Spanish Cabezo de la Almagra Museum and Archeological Park Rises from the Ruins

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