Lab-grown brains have started sprouting their own blood vessels

April 4, 2018 by  
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Lab-grown brains just got one step closer to reality after scientists announced that experimental mini brains have begun sprouting their own blood vessels. Brain balls were created from stem cells and are used to study brain disorders, including Zika -related microcephaly. Researchers hope that vascularized brain balls may prove to be effective in someday encouraging the regrowth of damaged brain tissue. “The whole idea with these organoids is to one day be able to develop a brain structure the patient has lost made with the patient’s own cells,” UC Davis vascular neurosurgeon Ben Waldau told Wired . Scientists at UC Davis have observed the generation of veins within brain balls, also known as cortical spheroids or neural organoids. Waldau and his team encouraged the vascularization of the brain balls by turning brain membrane cells extracted from a patient into stem cells as well as endothelial cells which line blood vessels. The brain balls grown from the stem cells were cultivated, then wrapped in a gel matrix composed of the endothelial cells and transplanted into a mouse brain. Two weeks after insertion, the organoid was healthy and had developed capillaries that had spread into the inner layers of the organoid. Related: Scientists grow test tube human brains with potential to think and feel Waldu was originally inspired to pursue this idea through his treatment of the rare Moyamoya disease, in which patients suffer from blocked arteries at the base of the brain, denying it blood. “We sometimes lay a patient’s own artery on top of the brain to get the blood vessels to start growing in,” explained Waldau. “When we replicated that process on a miniaturized scale we saw these vessels self-assemble.” This marks the first instance in which human organoids derived from stem cells create human blood cells. Previous experiments with mice had resulted in mouse blood cells infiltrating the organoid. Via Wired Images via Deposit Photos ,  Timothy Archibald/Stanford University and UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures

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Lab-grown brains have started sprouting their own blood vessels

The SkinGun sprays your own stem cells onto burns to speed healing

June 6, 2016 by  
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Like something straight out of a science fiction novel, the SkinGun by RenovaCare sprays a patient’s own stem cells onto their burns, healing them in a fraction of the time it takes to heal after skin graft surgery. New tests revealed just how efficient the innovative medical technology has proven to be so far, leaving many thinking: What will they think of next? RenovaCare first developed CellMist technology, which quite literally takes a patient’s stem cells , processes them, and gets them ready to be sprayed onto their wounds with the SkinGun to regenerate into new skin. Previous case studies have shown a person can receive the treatment within 90 minutes of arriving at the emergency room – a crucial window for patients with severe burns and other injuries. Related: Researchers unlock technique for using skin cells to regrow heart tissue The recent tests demonstrated how the SkinGun sprays the delicate cells so expertly it covers 200 times more surface area than conventional methods, and it does so gently enough that over 97 percent of the cells remain viable and able to regenerate . President and CEO of RenovaCare, Inc., Thomas Bold, stated , “Data from ongoing preclinical work supports our long-held conviction that our SkinGun™ technology is superior to standard methods for delivering fluids and stem cells to target sites, achieving excellent coverage while being extremely gentle to the cells.” RenovaCare targets its revolutionary medical technology at the U.S.’ booming $45 billion wound and burn care market. The futuristic device drastically cuts down on healing time, estimating that new skin begins to develop in as little as four days, compared to skin grafting’s weeks of recovery. In the next few decades we could see even more healing devices once thought to only exist in the worlds of fantasy. +RenovaCare Via Business Wire Images via RenovaCare

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The SkinGun sprays your own stem cells onto burns to speed healing

New stem cell therapy could cure blindness

May 21, 2016 by  
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Upwards of 30 million people on the planet suffer from Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), which causes pain and a black spot in the center of the patient’s vision that grows into eventual blindness. Recently, studies conducted at University College London reveal a possible cure for the first time in history. Professor Pete Coffey has been working to develop a treatment using a patient’s own stem cells for the past eight years , and the first patient to receive the treatment—just last August—is showing promising results. Coffey looked to stem cells to replace the layer of cells damaged by the progressive disease. AMD destroys the eye’s Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE), causing patients to experience a black spot in their vision which expands outward and leads to complete blindness . AMD sufferers also lose the ability to read and recognize familiar faces, altering their lives forever. The only existing treatments for AMD simply manage the discomfort associated with the disease, but there have been no breakthroughs for potential cures until now. Related: World’s first 3D-printed retinal cells could help cure blindness A 60-year-old woman with a severe form of AMD was Coffey’s first guinea pig. On August 11, 2015, surgeons at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London implanted stem cells that had been cultivated as RPE cells, hoping the new additions would step in and repair the degeneration. Six months after the procedure, Coffey was still hesitant to call the procedure  a win, despite improvements. “We are assessing her vision — we need more information to make conclusions,” said Coffey, who hopes patients can get their lives back. “Recovery is possible… there is a window when you can put the cells in and recover the patient’s vision. I would hope they can recognize their families again.” Via CNN Images via Sam Bald/Flickr and Wikipedia

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New stem cell therapy could cure blindness

Researchers have successfully 3D-printed brain tissue for the first time

August 13, 2015 by  
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Studying the brain is, as one might imagine, a fairly complex task—and it’s not tremendously often that scientists get to study the brain in all its three-dimensional glory. Instead, neuroscientists often rely on in vitro brain cell or tissue samples from animals. But when it comes to understanding the complex nature of the brain and its 86 billion nerve cells, those flat lab samples have limitations. But breakthrough research from researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science ( ACES ) in Australia has created 3D-printed layered structure that incorporates neural cells to mimic the structure of brain tissue, and it could have major consequences in studying and treating conditions such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s. Read the rest of Researchers have successfully 3D-printed brain tissue for the first time

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Researchers have successfully 3D-printed brain tissue for the first time

ACES’ 3D Printing BioPen Could Redraw the Way We Approach Bone Surgery

October 4, 2014 by  
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Fabricating artificial bones is one of the most interesting byproducts of the 3D-printing revolution . In the latest development , Australian researchers developed a BioPen that deposits regenerative stem cells onto damaged bone and cartilage in a process similar to 3D printing. Scientists at the Australian Research Council Center of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) at the University of Wollongong in New South Wales say their bone growth pen combines 3D-printing with stem cell research to regrow missing or diseased bone faster and more accurately. Read the rest of ACES’ 3D Printing BioPen Could Redraw the Way We Approach Bone Surgery Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed bone , 3d printing bones , 3D printing cells , ACES , ACES BioPen , Aikenhead Centre for Medical Discovery , Australian 3d printed bones , Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science , BioPen , bone replacement , bone surgery , medical research , Peter Choong , seaweed derived polymer , seaweed extract , St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne , stem cells , University of Wollongong

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ACES’ 3D Printing BioPen Could Redraw the Way We Approach Bone Surgery

Scientists Sucessfuly Create First Ever Cloned Embryo from Adult Cells

April 21, 2014 by  
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Just over one decade after successfully cloning Dolly the sheep, scientists have cloned the first human embryo from adult cells. The breakthrough could pave the way to personalized organ transplants and therapies based on stem cells that could theoretically be grown into any type of human tissue. Read the rest of Scientists Sucessfuly Create First Ever Cloned Embryo from Adult Cells Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bioengineering , clone human embryos , cloned human tissue , cloned sheep , cloning moral issues , Dolly sheep , genetic engineering , human cloning , in vitro stem cells , medicine breakthrough , medicine discovery , medicine technology , organ transplant , stem cells

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Scientists Sucessfuly Create First Ever Cloned Embryo from Adult Cells

5 tech trends mingling with bio-inspired design

November 5, 2013 by  
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Lobster-eye telescopes and 3D-printed stem cells. Where is bio-inspired design popping up next?

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5 tech trends mingling with bio-inspired design

Survey reveals sustainability is stalled at most companies

November 5, 2013 by  
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Just one in five companies says it has significantly integrated sustainability across its businesses.

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Survey reveals sustainability is stalled at most companies

4 signs of sustainability from oil, gas and mining companies

November 5, 2013 by  
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The sector is demonstrating innovation amid a backdrop of increased scrutiny and transparency.

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4 signs of sustainability from oil, gas and mining companies

Why the relationship between water and agriculture needs to change

November 5, 2013 by  
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One-fourth of the world's crops are grown in water-stressed zones. Here's a closer look at the tension between food and water.

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Why the relationship between water and agriculture needs to change

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