C.F. Mller’s stunning Low Energy Center in London showcases an innovative use of steel

September 14, 2017 by  
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Europe’s largest new residential heat network – the Greenwich Peninsula Low Energy Center in London – saves over 20,000 tons of carbon every year. C.F. Møller Architects and British artist Conrad Shawcross  designed the groundbreaking facility, which is clad in hundreds of triangular panels that fold and flow across the surface of the tower. The center won this year’s coveted GAGA Architecture Award for the most innovative and effective use of galvanized steelwork. The Greenwich Peninsula Low Energy Center sits at the entrance of the peninsula next to the Blackwall Tunnel Approach. It houses boilers and CHP that provide heat energy to the businesses and homes due to be built in the coming years Its impressive appearance can be attributed to Conrad Shawcross. The artist designed the facade of the 160-foot (49 meter) high tower as a way of communicating commitment to sustainable and affordable energy for all. Related: C.F. Møller Architects designs Danish school that optimizes learning through design The perforated steel panels create a Moiré Effect , and facilitate animated patterns of light at night. Named ‘The Optic Cloak’ the structure is formed of hundreds of triangular panels – each the size of a London bus – folded across the surface of the tower forming complex geometric patterns. + C.F. Møller Architects + Conrad Shawcross Photos by Mark Hadden

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C.F. Mller’s stunning Low Energy Center in London showcases an innovative use of steel

Light-filled Compass House prioritizes low maintenance and energy savings

March 23, 2017 by  
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Toronto-based superkül architects designed a vacation home for a family of six transitioning back to Canada after living abroad. Set on the grassy plains of Mulmur, Ontario, the 4,300-square-foot dwelling is a striking all-white building that prioritizes low maintenance, natural light, and energy savings. The energy-efficient home was built in two phases, the first of which was certified LEED Gold . Created as a spacious weekend home, the Compass House comprises two volumes arranged in an L-shaped plan with multiple bedrooms and an open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room at the heart. The dwelling was constructed with locally sourced fieldstone and other low-maintenance materials such as the white cement-board siding, aluminum windows, and steel roof. In contrast to the hardy, weatherproof exterior, the interior emanates warmth with white oak and knotty white cedar floors and walls. Related: Superkül Designs Canada’s First Active House Skylights and large windows fill the home with natural light and ventilation. The ample glazing also frames views of the varied landscape, from the forests to the west to the 100 acres of fields in the north and east. An outdoor courtyard extends the indoor spaces out. “Through its siting, tectonics and materiality, it balances intimacy and expansiveness, light and dark, land and sky — orienting and heightening one’s experience of the surrounding environment,” wrote the architects. Use of geothermal -powered heating and cooling, natural daylighting, passive ventilation, and high insulation values help keep energy demands low despite the building’s large size. Construction waste was also kept to a minimum. + Superkül Images by Ben Rahn / A-Frame Studio

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Light-filled Compass House prioritizes low maintenance and energy savings

BIPVCo seeks to sell the ‘little black dress’ of rooftop solar

January 24, 2017 by  
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A side project by Tata Steel grew into this building-integrated solar startup with competition from SolarCity and Sunflare.

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BIPVCo seeks to sell the ‘little black dress’ of rooftop solar

This showroom in China looks like a piece of paper floating on water

December 5, 2016 by  
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The design of this showroom and management office in China was inspired by a piece of paper floating on water. FMD Architects designed the building as an addition to a large industrial office park in Minhang District, Shanghai, and combined exposed concrete, wood and steel to give it an industrial feel. The designers created the building to look like a piece of paper floating on water, only touching the surface in two points. Its simple structural system comprises a concrete base and core, wooden columns and a sloping roof that shelters a double-height space . Related: Tesla’s Red Hot and Green Los Angeles Showroom The concrete base protects the wood from the elements, while the solid concrete core takes most of the horizontal loads. Additional natural light is introduced through the skylight which also improves natural ventilation . The architects chose to hide all the lights and equipment, leaving exposed only the original concrete, wood and steel joints, giving the entire space an industrial feel. + FMD Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Yinhui Wang

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This showroom in China looks like a piece of paper floating on water

Sprawling Bracketed Space House frames views of forests and rolling hills in Austin, Texas

November 28, 2016 by  
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The house is located on a sloped site in Austin, Texas. It reaches out to embrace the surrounding landscape and blur the line between the interior and the exterior spaces. The wings of the house are topped with flat roofs and are connected by a glazed volume that establishes a visual connection between the front and rear of the house. Related: Architect Miguel Rivera’s Daylit Residence in Austin is a Renovated 1917 Bungalow Open-plan interior spaces are oriented towards the c ourtyard with an infinity pool that overlooks rolling hills and forests. Cedar , steel, natural stucco , concrete and glass create a mixture of textures and colors. + Matt Fajkus Architecture Via D ezeen Photos by Charles Davis Smith, Spaces & Faces Photography

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Sprawling Bracketed Space House frames views of forests and rolling hills in Austin, Texas

Repaired sinkhole in Japan is sinking again

November 28, 2016 by  
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Earlier in November a sinkhole that ravaged a five-lane intersection in the city of Fukuoka, Japan was rapidly fixed and reopened in just a week. But now part of the repaired street has shown signs of sinking again. Around a 30 square meter, or 322 square foot, area, on the roadhttp://inhabitat.com/tag/road/”> road> sunk seven centimeters, or 2.7 inches. The sinkhole in Japan, which was near the JR Hakata Station, was repaired in around 48 hours , filled in with cement and sand. Only a week after the sinkhole closed the road, officials reopened the street. Fukuoka mayor Soichiro Takashima said the repaired road was 30 times stronger than it had been previously. Experts said new subway construction had likely led to the large sinkhole. Related: Japanese fix massive city sinkhole within 48 hours But over the weekend, officials discovered the road sunk 2.7 inches across 322 square feet. No one was injured by the newly sinking road, nor were there any gas leaks or power outages caused by the new sinking. Officials closed the road at around 1:45 AM local time, but reopened the area almost four hours later at 5:30 AM local time, according to Channel NewsAsia. Authorities determined the small sink wasn’t dangerous for people walking or driving on the road. Officials told CNN they had expected some movement after the sinkhole was fixed, and Takashima apologized on Facebook for not letting locals know that the road could sink once more. He said officials would continue to monitor the area. A government spokesperson told local news that when the cement mixed with special soil compressed, the motion could have caused the small sinking. The original sinkhole was 98 feet long, 88 feet wide, and almost 50 feet deep . No one was seriously hurt, yet the sound of a ” loud boom ” startled locals as the sinkhole opened. Fukuoka is home to around 1.5 million people, and is the fifth biggest city in Japan. Via CNN and Channel NewsAsia Images via Soichiro Takashima Facebook ( 1 , 2 )

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Repaired sinkhole in Japan is sinking again

These student-designed cabins for Outward Bound are rustic and awesome

April 11, 2016 by  
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Daniel Libeskind and Immersive’s spectacular LED light towers bloom in Milan

July 16, 2015 by  
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Fascinating Hungarian House of Music Acts an Instrument for Experiencing Rhythm and Melody

November 20, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Fascinating Hungarian House of Music Acts an Instrument for Experiencing Rhythm and Melody Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: concrete building , house of music , Hungarian House of Music , Hungary , LOHA Architects , music , performance space , steel , Wood

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Fascinating Hungarian House of Music Acts an Instrument for Experiencing Rhythm and Melody

Baskets Full of Local Limestone Make Up the Façade of This Stunning House in Poland

October 30, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Baskets Full of Local Limestone Make Up the Façade of This Stunning House in Poland Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: gabion baskets , green architecture , Krakow , Kropka Studio , locally sourced limestone , locally sourced material , natural lights , Poland , polish architecture , raw materials , steel , stone house , sustainable home , wooden facade

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Baskets Full of Local Limestone Make Up the Façade of This Stunning House in Poland

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