Meet the company that singlehandedly halved one country’s CO2 emissions

March 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Meet the company that singlehandedly halved one country’s CO2 emissions

Something is right in the state of Denmark.

Read the original here:
Meet the company that singlehandedly halved one country’s CO2 emissions

Joel Makower, GreenBiz Group: The state of green business

February 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Joel Makower, GreenBiz Group: The state of green business

The eleventh annual State of Green Business report examines the key trends affecting sustainable business, provides an assessment of the key metrics of company performance on natural capital and other resource issues, and offers a look into the state of the sustainability profession.

See the original post:
Joel Makower, GreenBiz Group: The state of green business

Welcome day 1

February 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Welcome day 1

GreenBiz Chairman and Executive Editor Joel Makower, President Pete May, and Conference Director Ellie Buechner welcome GreenBiz 18 participants to the conference.

Go here to see the original:
Welcome day 1

Episode 108: State of Green Business 18; Blackrock hypes purpose

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Episode 108: State of Green Business 18; Blackrock hypes purpose

In this week’s episode, why Larry Fink champions social purpose, the state of the green profession and business goes loggerheads with sea turtles.

See the original post here:
Episode 108: State of Green Business 18; Blackrock hypes purpose

Staten Island neighborhood returning to nature for superstorm buffer zone

October 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Staten Island neighborhood returning to nature for superstorm buffer zone

The Staten Island neighborhood of Oakwood Beach was hit hard by Superstorm Sandy five years ago. Since then, 80 percent of Oakwood Beach residents have sold their homes to the state of New York , which hopes to turn the area into a buffer zone to guard against future superstorms . Many homes have since been torn down, and the area is slowly returning to nature. Superstorms could hit the New York City region more frequently in the future. A recent Rutgers University study found storms flooding the city with at least 7.4-foot surges – an event which occurred every 500 years before 1800 – will hit once every five years by 2030, reports Reuters . Governor’s Office of Storm Recovery executive director Lisa Bova-Hiatt told Reuters the state pursued the home buyout program in large part because they expected more superstorms. She said, “To say that extreme weather is not our new normal would just be incredibly short-sighted.” Related: How to Prepare Your Home and Family for a Hurricane or Superstorm Many Oakwood Beach locals have taken the state up on their buyout program. The state has spent $255 million with money from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development to purchase 654 properties, and most of those are in Staten Island. There are 83 more properties in the pipeline, according to the Office of Storm Recovery. Bova-Hiatt said the program is voluntary but “it would be fantastic to have the entire area as a buffer zone.” The state has torn down townhouses and bungalows, and planted grass on the sites of former homes. Out of 402 homes in Oakwood Beach eligible for the program, the state was unable to acquire 88. Reuters spoke with Gregory and Olga Epshteyn, locals who decided not to take the state up on their offer. Gregory said the city still provides services like street lights and trash pickup, and that the neighborhood is the best place to live in Staten Island. Olga told Reuters, “We love it here, but we miss our neighbors.” Via Reuters Images via Sunghwan Yoon on Flickr ( 1 , 2 )

Read the rest here:
Staten Island neighborhood returning to nature for superstorm buffer zone

Staten Island neighborhood returning to nature for superstorm buffer zone

October 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Staten Island neighborhood returning to nature for superstorm buffer zone

The Staten Island neighborhood of Oakwood Beach was hit hard by Superstorm Sandy five years ago. Since then, 80 percent of Oakwood Beach residents have sold their homes to the state of New York , which hopes to turn the area into a buffer zone to guard against future superstorms . Many homes have since been torn down, and the area is slowly returning to nature. Superstorms could hit the New York City region more frequently in the future. A recent Rutgers University study found storms flooding the city with at least 7.4-foot surges – an event which occurred every 500 years before 1800 – will hit once every five years by 2030, reports Reuters . Governor’s Office of Storm Recovery executive director Lisa Bova-Hiatt told Reuters the state pursued the home buyout program in large part because they expected more superstorms. She said, “To say that extreme weather is not our new normal would just be incredibly short-sighted.” Related: How to Prepare Your Home and Family for a Hurricane or Superstorm Many Oakwood Beach locals have taken the state up on their buyout program. The state has spent $255 million with money from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development to purchase 654 properties, and most of those are in Staten Island. There are 83 more properties in the pipeline, according to the Office of Storm Recovery. Bova-Hiatt said the program is voluntary but “it would be fantastic to have the entire area as a buffer zone.” The state has torn down townhouses and bungalows, and planted grass on the sites of former homes. Out of 402 homes in Oakwood Beach eligible for the program, the state was unable to acquire 88. Reuters spoke with Gregory and Olga Epshteyn, locals who decided not to take the state up on their offer. Gregory said the city still provides services like street lights and trash pickup, and that the neighborhood is the best place to live in Staten Island. Olga told Reuters, “We love it here, but we miss our neighbors.” Via Reuters Images via Sunghwan Yoon on Flickr ( 1 , 2 )

See the rest here:
Staten Island neighborhood returning to nature for superstorm buffer zone

The State of Recycling in India: Slow Improvements

October 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on The State of Recycling in India: Slow Improvements

In 2009, we wrote a series of articles called “Trash … The post The State of Recycling in India: Slow Improvements appeared first on Earth911.com.

See original here:
The State of Recycling in India: Slow Improvements

"You had to live it to believe it" – hundreds of polar bears rush to feast on one whale carcass

October 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on "You had to live it to believe it" – hundreds of polar bears rush to feast on one whale carcass

When a bowhead whale washed ashore at Wrangel Island in Russia , the polar bears were ready. Between 150 and 230 bears gathered to eat the carcass, and tourists captured the experience on camera. As there are around 26,000 of the animals on Earth, almost one percent of the world’s polar bears, according to Gizmodo, assembled for the feast. The polar bears dined on the whale carcass on Wrangel Island. While polar bears feeding on whales may not be that strange, Gizmodo points out what was unique was that so many people were present to witness the event. A tourist ship passed by as the bears were feasting. Related: Snow-free images of Arctic polar bears show the harsh reality of climate change Heritage Expeditions founder Rodney Russ said his group counted more than 150 polar bears, while Wrangel Island State Nature Reserve said conservative estimates put the number of polar bears at more than 230. Bears of all ages and sexes were present. According to a Wrangel Island State Nature Reserve news release, scientists were aboard the tourist ship, and an international scientific group monitoring bear populations in Chukotka – where Wrangel Island is located – and Alaska were told of the event. Russ wrote in a blog post, “You had to live it to believe it, even now there are people pinching themselves to make sure it really happened…there are no words to describe it.” Polar bears aren’t endangered , but are listed as vulnerable , a step below endangered, on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Red List of Endangered Species . The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) said some populations are stable, some appear to be on the rise, and others are decreasing. The loss of sea ice could seriously impact the animals. WWF said global polar bear numbers could fall 30 percent by 2050. Via Gizmodo , Wrangel Island State Nature Reserve , and Heritage Expeditions Images via A. Gruzdev

Here is the original post:
"You had to live it to believe it" – hundreds of polar bears rush to feast on one whale carcass

Episode 92: Clean energy buyers shift policy; a risky future

September 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Episode 92: Clean energy buyers shift policy; a risky future

In this week’s episode, why trickle-down sustainability doesn’t work, the state of clean energy buying and what BSR has learned at 25.

Original post:
Episode 92: Clean energy buyers shift policy; a risky future

A mix of energy sources advance Hawaii’s renewables goal

August 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on A mix of energy sources advance Hawaii’s renewables goal

Once Hawaii publicized its goal to be powered entirely by renewable energy by 2045, the state’s options to get there expanded greatly. “We saw a slew of different solutions that can help Hawaii get to its renewables goal,” said Luis Salaveria, director of the Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT). That includes the renewables mix of hydro, wind and solar, as well as the technology to get power on the grid. 

Read the rest here:
A mix of energy sources advance Hawaii’s renewables goal

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 9012 access attempts in the last 7 days.