A green roof naturally cools a bioclimatic mosque in Indonesia

September 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A green roof naturally cools a bioclimatic mosque in Indonesia

Jakarta-based architecture firm RAD+ar (Research Artistic Design + architecture) has recently completed the Bioclimatic Community Mosque of Pamulang, which is located about an hour south of the Indonesian capital. Designed to follow passive solar principles, the bioclimatic building departs from traditional mosque architecture in favor of optimizing indoor comfort, self-sufficiency and minimal maintenance. In addition to maximizing natural light and ventilation, the architects also topped the community mosque with an active green roof — instead of the iconic Islamic dome — in order to reduce the urban heat island effect. Spanning an area of 1,200 square meters to accommodate approximately 1,000 people, the Bioclimatic Community Mosque is more than just a place of worship. Like many mosques , the Pamulang building also functions as a community center, meeting space and recreational space for the surrounding neighborhood. RAD+ar’s strikingly contemporary design for the mosque reflects the building’s multifunctional services. Related: Henning Larsen Architects reveal plans for a new mosque in Copenhagen that marries Islamic and Nordic design Creating low-maintenance and cost-effective safeguards against the region’s extreme heat and humidity drove the design narrative and informed the architects’ decision to replace almost all of the brick partitions with over 30,000 pieces of locally produced accustomed roster block that provide privacy while allowing light and air through. “Basic geometric-volumetric approach as the sunken massing (to harness lower temperature) stacked on top of another, this allowed many level of wind speed variation crossing the building that provides total shade and extreme temperature and air pressure differences that ensure 24 hours cross ventilation & thermal chimney effect,” the architects explained in a press release. Natural lighting is also maximized throughout the building, while strategically placed openings optimize cross ventilating and the stack effect . Both indoor and outdoor spaces were crafted to provide thermal comfort; the inclusion of shaded outdoor spaces large enough to accommodate gatherings has been particularly helpful for accommodating activities during the COVID-19 pandemic. + RAD+ar Photography by William Sutanto via RAD+ar

Originally posted here:
A green roof naturally cools a bioclimatic mosque in Indonesia

The 2018 Super Bowl stadium in Minnesota offsets 100% of its energy

January 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The 2018 Super Bowl stadium in Minnesota offsets 100% of its energy

The NFL’s Super Bowl LII kicks off next Sunday—but football won’t be the only thing on our mind when the game begins. This year’s championship game will be held in Minneapolis, the northernmost American city to ever host a Super Bowl, at the LEED Gold-certified U.S. Bank Stadium . Designed by American architecture firm HKS , the energy-efficient NFL stadium is home to the Minnesota Vikings, and it offsets 100% of its electricity with renewable energy credits and employs energy-efficient technologies. Minneapolis’ snowy winter climate presented a major challenge in designing the 1.8 million-square-foot U.S. Bank Stadium. The sculptural shape of the stadium, which features a jagged form evoking ice formations and Viking longboats, was designed in response to environmental conditions: the asymmetrical steep roofline efficiently sheds snow, while southern exposure is maximized for increased snow melting capability. Inspired by traditional Nordic dwellings, the stadium’s lightweight roof uses a single steel truss and is covered with ETFE —the first ETFE roof in a U.S. stadium—to allow solar thermal heating and natural daylight. It has the added benefit of letting the visitors feel as if they’re sitting outside. In addition to translucent ETFE, high-performance glass wraps around part of the stadium to further minimize the need for artificial lighting. Zinc cladding envelops the majority of the building – this material was chosen for its low maintenance and durability. The form of the building optimizes air circulation, which draws captured heat from a “heat reservoir” down to the seating bowl. In the summer, the flow of air risers is reversed to take advantage of the “stack effect” , which ventilates heat at the top of the building while drawing in cool air from below. Related: The 50th Super Bowl at Levi’s Stadium will be a net-zero energy game Heat recovery, air handling units, efficient ventilation, and high-efficiency motors reduced the U.S. Bank Stadium’s energy costs by 16 percent as compared to Minneapolis’ smaller Metrodome, the former home of the Vikings. Lighting was also reduced by 37 percent thanks to the installation of LED sports lighting. The stadium has implemented a sustainability program and is working towards becoming a zero-waste facility. Super Bowl LII will take place Sunday, February 4 at the U.S. Bank Stadium featuring the New England Patriots and the Philadelphia Eagles. + HKS Images via HKS

Original post: 
The 2018 Super Bowl stadium in Minnesota offsets 100% of its energy

Exquisite Japanese house wraps around a generations-old tree

January 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Exquisite Japanese house wraps around a generations-old tree

The line between nature and architecture is often blurred in Japan to beautiful effect. Japanese architect Takashi Okuno practices this kind of nature-fused architecture with Hiiragi’s House, a modern Japanese-style residence built around a courtyard and old tree that the client’s family has tended to for generations. Located in the Ehime Prefecture, the house is minimally decorated and built with large expanses of glass to focus the eye on the use of simple, natural materials and courtyard views. Named after the venerated generations-old tree, Hiiragi’s House was built to wrap around a mature hiiragi (Japanese for ‘holly osmanthus’ that’s not seen in the photographs due the tree’s “recuperation”). The architect highlighted the importance of the tree by making the courtyard visible from nearly every room in the home, including the entrance hallway. Floor-to-ceiling windows and sliding doors frame views of the courtyard from the open-plan living room, where a wood-burning stove visually delineates the lounge from the kitchen and dining area. Related: Beautiful cedar home stands high on stilts to accommodate heavy snowfall in Japan Environmentally friendly practices were also put into place. Rather than solely rely on fans for cooling, natural ventilation is optimized, as is the stack effect, where cool outside air is pulled into the double-height living room and hot air exits through clerestory windows on the second floor. Rain chains collect rainwater runoff from the roof, while cellulose fiber is used for heat insulation. The architect also stressed the use of natural materials throughout the building to create a healthy and welcoming environment, seen from the solid timber framing and straw-floor tatami mats to washi-paper screens and diatomaceous earth used as a finishing material. + Takashi Okuno Via Dezeen Images by Shigeo Ogawa

Continued here: 
Exquisite Japanese house wraps around a generations-old tree

Renovated forever home strives to minimize its carbon footprint

January 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Renovated forever home strives to minimize its carbon footprint

Sustainable architecture doesn’t have to come at the cost of beauty. Take, for example, this lovely refurbished home in Melbourne with its elegantly exposed timber frame, modern decor, and eco-certified building materials. Foomann Architects led the redesign, titled Ballantyne Street, to meet the client’s brief for a sustainable home where they intend to live in forever. Foomann Architects preserved much of the single-story dwelling’s original structure, including the front, but replaced the 1990s extension in the rear with a more modern addition that houses an open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen, study, as well as a new bedroom. The renovation and expansion accommodates the client’s family of five and visiting guests. In contrast to the home’s original and rather unassuming frontage, the new modern addition is wrapped in full-height glazing that lets in natural light and views of a fenced-in backyard. “The design was approached in this context; to be no bigger than required and enduring,” wrote the architects. “This resonated strongly with our practice; every decision weighing up cost, longevity and environmental impact.” The modern addition features an interior mainly made of masonry and glass broken up by beautiful exposed timber framing —made of composite laminated lumber veneer —integrated with joinery, echoed in the furnishings, and extended across rooms to the outdoor spaces. The joinery is also integrated with concealed lighting for a clean and minimalist appearance. Related: Solar-powered forever home is a modern take on the rustic farmhouse The dedication to sourcing eco-certified and durable materials as well as the design of compact room sizes earned the project a Commendation for sustainability in the ArchiTeam 2017 Awards . + Foomann Architects Via Dezeen Images by Willem-Dirk du Toit

Continued here: 
Renovated forever home strives to minimize its carbon footprint

Church built for $35k stays naturally cool in Malawi

May 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Church built for $35k stays naturally cool in Malawi

Design nonprofit Architecture for a Change continues their life-changing work with the completion of a new church for the Chimphamba community in Malawi. Built to replace a dilapidated community center, the Rural Church draws inspiration from the traditional African drum with its circular floor plan. The building relies on the thermal mass of earthen bricks, wall openings, and a ventilation tower to stay naturally cool in Malawi’s subtropical heat. Created in collaboration with Youth of Malawi and the chiefs of the Chimphamba community, Architecture for a Change’s Rural Church was designed to meet the skill set of local builders while providing some new learning opportunities. The building was constructed with a cylindrical form, a shape that symbolizes safety and protection in the community. Citing the community’s use of cylindrical chicken coops and maize storage containers, the architects say the Christian church’s shape “was used as a metaphor for the design: as space that will protect and safeguard the sense of community in Chimphamba.” Three boxes, built of locally burnt red brick to match the rural vernacular, are inserted into the round building. The first box serves as a foyer while a second, taller box uses the stack effect to function as a ventilation tower for natural cooling . Using temperature differences and lower air pressures at higher heights, the ventilation tower passively pulls hot air to the top of the building and sucks fresh air into the building. Related: Architecture For a Change Designs Lightweight Church for South African Zandspruit Community Small holes punctuate the building to let in natural light and ventilation. The church’s roof symbolizes a Christian cross and is covered with translucent roof sheeting to allow additional natural light in. The building was completed in early 2017 with a budget of $35,000 USD. + Architecture for a Change Images via Architecture for a Change

Read more:
Church built for $35k stays naturally cool in Malawi

Lincoln Mixed Use Building In Denver Features High Tech Prefab Curtain Wall

April 11, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Lincoln Mixed Use Building In Denver Features High Tech Prefab Curtain Wall

Read the rest of Lincoln Mixed Use Building In Denver Features High Tech Prefab Curtain Wall http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , Denver , eco design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , meridian 105 architecture , mixed use building , mixed-use complex , natural ventilation , Prefab , prefab construction , prefab window unit , solar shading , stack effect , Sustainable Building , sustainable design

The rest is here:
Lincoln Mixed Use Building In Denver Features High Tech Prefab Curtain Wall

Audi’s All-Electric E-Tron A3 Concept Car Could Hit the Market in 2013

April 11, 2011 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Audi’s All-Electric E-Tron A3 Concept Car Could Hit the Market in 2013

Audi has just revealed their all-electric E-Tron A3 concept car and unlike some of their past ideas (like the E-Tron Type C ) this vehicle is no exercise in design – it’s a market-ready no-emissions automobile .

Go here to read the rest: 
Audi’s All-Electric E-Tron A3 Concept Car Could Hit the Market in 2013

Bad Behavior has blocked 5219 access attempts in the last 7 days.