How the humble bollard can save lives while improving urban design

July 20, 2017 by  
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Good design can save lives – and sometimes, it’s the humblest designs that do the most good. You may rarely notice them, but bollards keep pedestrians safe by restricting vehicle traffic – and they can save lives in the event of an accident or terrorist attack. That said, no one wants to feel like they are living in a fortress , which is why some companies like Reliance Foundry offer bollards that don’t just protect people – they enhance the architecture of the surrounding city. A bollard is a metal post installed along sidewalks, public squares and parking lots to help direct traffic and create a protective barrier between vehicles and pedestrians. Bollards are sometimes installed during events, and they can take many forms – including concrete barriers, or even massive dump trucks filled with sand. But for day-to-day protection, most people prefer something a little better looking. Successful urban design makes people feel comfortable while ensuring their safety. Barbed wire and concrete barriers may be effective, but they make city dwellers feel like they are living in a war zone. That’s why companies like Reliance Foundry create decorative covers that can be placed over steel pipe bollards to turn something purely functional into something that is also attractive to look at. Reliance Foundry offers decorative metal bollard covers that range from traditional cannonball-on-a-pole designs to streamlined cylinders and elegant columns. The covers are available in a wide range of sizes and materials – including ductile iron, steel, and aluminum – and they make pipe bollards blend into the urban environment instead of sticking out like a sore thumb. Installers should always consult with an engineer to ensure that bollards meet specific impact requirements. Reliance Foundry also offers bollards that introduce solar lighting along pathways, as well as dual-purpose designs that protect pedestrians while providing bike parking . + Reliance Foundry

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How the humble bollard can save lives while improving urban design

Dutch studio unveils colorful solar-powered village for area homeless

July 20, 2017 by  
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Studio Elmo Vemijs from the Netherlands has created a beautiful tiny home village on the outskirts of Eindhoven to help those who find themselves in dire straits. The architects designed the neighborhood layout as well as the solar-powered , 355-square-feet homes to meet the specific needs of the residents. The inspiration for the village came from the Dutch phrase “Skaeve Huse” – roughly translated as “special homes for special people.” Working in collaboration with social housing organization, The Trudo Housing Corporation , the architects designed the tiny homes specifically for individuals suffering from mental illness, drug addiction, and anyone that simply has trouble living in a traditional home environment. Most Skaeve Huses are typically temporary shelters , but with this particular project, the team wanted to create a community of permanent, energy-neutral homes that could offer long-term benefits to the residents as well as the surrounding community. Related: Missouri community is building 50 tiny homes for homeless veterans Located on a tree-filled plot of land, the neighborhood is comprised out of a series of small, energy-efficient homes. All of the structures are made out of a corrugated steel facade with protruding window frames, but each has a unique color scheme. The interior layouts include an entrance hall, living room, kitchen, bathroom along with large windows that provide optimal natural light on the interior. Studio Elmo Vermijs designed the houses as well as the landscape architecture. Using the abundance of existing trees as a guide for the layout, walking paths were created that lead from home to home. The organization of the village gives each resident plenty of privacy and independence, but without creating an atmosphere of isolation. The surrounding greenery along with the home’s cheerful colors provide the village with a vibrant, fun atmosphere. + Studio Elmo Vermijs Via Curbed Images via Studio Elmo Vemijs  

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Dutch studio unveils colorful solar-powered village for area homeless

Greenbuild: The world’s biggest green building expo is coming to Boston

July 18, 2017 by  
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The world’s biggest conference dedicated to green building is coming to Boston this November – and you won’t want to miss it. The Greenbuild International Conference and Expo will convene sustainable building experts, professionals and leaders for mind-blowing exhibits, learning activities, a Net Zero zone, and pavilions packed with the latest in green building technology. If you are passionate about green living, then clear your calendar for November 8 – 10 and get ready for an amazing experience. This year, Greenbuild will feature education, workshops, tours, awards, and an expo hall that is not to be missed. Inhabitat regularly attends the conference, so we know first-hand how great it can be. Check out our coverage from past years to get a glimpse into what you can expect – we’ve rounded up some of our favorite innovations here , here and here . Greenbuild has a reputation for stellar education sessions, where you can learn about a huge range of topics – from passive and net zero building to tips from developers who are changing the face of the industry. Workshops qualify for continuing education credits and toward LEED certification hours. Summit topics will include Communities and Affordable Homes, The Water Summit and the International Summit. Greenbuild’s tours are always highly anticipated, and this year’s lineup promises to be exceptional. Attendees will be able to visit four net positive and passive house buildings that are breaking the mold, MIT to learn about its green building innovations, and some of Boston’s groundbreaking green spaces. Early registration ends September 7, so head over to Greenbuild to nab your spot now. + Greenbuild Expo Save

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Greenbuild: The world’s biggest green building expo is coming to Boston

Wind economics: How to find the devil in the details

May 24, 2017 by  
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Sponsored: Buying wind energy isn’t just a matter of signing up. There are a number of complex questions to ponder.

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Wind economics: How to find the devil in the details

Domains as brand strategy: What does a URL say about you?

April 25, 2017 by  
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Sponsored: An .eco domain can demonstrate your company’s environmental commitment and distinguish it from the crowd.

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Domains as brand strategy: What does a URL say about you?

Will wearable technology destroy advances in recycling?

April 19, 2017 by  
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Sponsored: From Fitness trackers to smart socks, these innovations bring lots of promise — but also environmental challenges.

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Will wearable technology destroy advances in recycling?

Sustainable meat — made in a box?

April 19, 2017 by  
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Can new modular, USDA-compliant meat processing units tucked into shipping containers help make small- to mid-scale farms more successful and sustainable?

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Sustainable meat — made in a box?

Why businesses should lead on climate action

March 3, 2017 by  
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Sponsored: Corporations with a global view are taking seriously their role as leaders in climate action.

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Why businesses should lead on climate action

John de Graaf: Buying less is more for social sustainability

March 3, 2017 by  
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The “Affluenza” director discusses decoupling economic growth from consumption and reaching out across the political aisle.

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John de Graaf: Buying less is more for social sustainability

Seeing forest though the trees – widening the lens for real returns

February 6, 2017 by  
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Sponsored: Only in understanding what landscapes mean to each actor operating within it, can solutions to negate deforestation be implemented.

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Seeing forest though the trees – widening the lens for real returns

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