Incredible Algae Dome absorbs sun and CO2 to produce superfood and oxygen

September 5, 2017 by  
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Industrial agriculture is blamed as a major cause of greenhouse gas, but what if there was a way to sustainably produce food that could help solve some of the world’s toughest environmental problems? That’s what the folks at SPACE10 , a Copenhagen-based future-living lab, tackled with the futuristic Algae Dome, a four-meter-tall food-producing architecture pavilion that pumps out oxygen in a closed-loop system. Powered by solar energy, the Algae Dome offers a sustainable and hyper-local food system that can pop up almost anywhere with minimal impact on the environment. Architects Aleksander Wadas, Rafal Wroblewski, Anna Stempniewicz, and bioengineer Keenan Pinto created the Algae Dome, which was presented at the CHART art fair in Copenhagen last week. Although SPACE10 has experimented with growing microgreens before, the team targets an even smaller food with the Algae Dome—micro-algae. Praised as a future “superfood,” micro-algae is said to contain twice as much protein as meat and is packed with vitamins and minerals, with more beta carotene than carrots and more iron than found in spinach, according to SPACE10. Even better? Micro-algae are among the world’s fastest-growing organisms and can be grown with sunshine and water almost anywhere, all while sucking up carbon dioxide and expelling oxygen in the process. Related: SPACE10 creates an open-source Growroom you can build at home During the three-day CHART art fair, the Algae Dome produced 450 liters of micro-algae and provided an interactive architectural experience that was part food system, part furniture, and wholly educational. The large amount of food was produced in a surprisingly small amount of space thanks to the design that featured 320 meters of coiled tubing, showing off the flow of emerald green micro-algae. Visitors were invited to sit inside the pavilion and enjoy a “breath of fresh air” created by the micro-algae as it converted carbon dioxide into oxygen. Packets of delicious spirulina (a type of blue-green algae) chips, created by SPACE10’s chef-in-residence Simon Perez, were placed around the pavilion to give passersby the chance to try the superfood. “In the future, different species of microalgae could be used as a form of nutrient-rich food, as a replacement for soy protein in animal feed, in the development of biofuels, as a way to reduce carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases from the atmosphere, and as a method of treating industrial wastewater,” said SPACE10. “In other words, microalgae could help combat malnutrition, reduce our dependence on fossil fuels , help stop the destruction of the rainforest, improve air quality, and reduce pollution. Little wonder that microalgae has been dubbed the future’s sustainable super crop.” SPACE10 sees the Algae Dome as the prototype for food-producing architecture that could pop up virtually anywhere, from bus stops to apartment complexes. + SPACE10 Picture credit: Niklas Adrian Vindelev

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Incredible Algae Dome absorbs sun and CO2 to produce superfood and oxygen

IKEA’s Space10 is creating on-site aquaponic farms for restaurant supply

June 9, 2016 by  
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Using LED lights from the IKEA RYDDA/VÄXER hydroponic garden , which will be available in the US next year, along with some good old classic shelves and plastic bins, Space10 has created a farm in a tiny basement room of their studio in Copenhagen. Over 80 percent of the supplies to create the farm came straight from IKEA, hacked to suit the purpose, of course. The entire project shows how technology and nature can combine to create a sustainable future – from the sounds of birds chirping, which came from a nearby iPad (plants are reported to grow better when they are surrounded by the sounds of their natural habitat), to the green sprouts peeking out of their earthy substrate. Related: IKEA reaches for net positive energy status in the next four years Space10 looked at the question of how we can make a positive impact on the planet from a different perspective. They toyed around with the idea of creating a shower alarm that lets you know when a person has used too much water until they realized not only is the shower one of the last places we can escape technology, you’d have to skip showers for months to equal the water used in one hamburger. So they shifted gears and started asking how they could make a burger water-friendly. The solution? Bugs. Combined with on-site grown herbs and lettuces, the combination turns a classic unsustainable American meal into one with very little impact on the planet. For lunch, Space10 served Inhabitat a meal that showed how food could be supplied right on site and have little impact on the environment. We were each given a miniature garden that we harvested and placed on top of our bugburger, made from mealworm, beetroot and gluten, which was shockingly tasty thanks to chef Simon Perez . Along with a side of surprise fries (also containing insects), the meal showed how beautiful, delicious and sustainable the future of food can be. Space10 hopes to illustrate how food supplies can be pushed into the future, and our host Carla  likened the situation to the human body: when we get sick, we eat healthier, take better care of ourselves, exercise and do our best to feel better. Right now, the planet is sick, and we need to help care for it in order to heal it. A sustainable food supply is key, and it can start right at home – or in this case – right in the restaurant. Space10 is going to test the aquaponics concept in the IKEA restaurant in Malmö, Sweden. No word on whether the bugburger will be hitting your lunch plate any time soon. Photos by Kristine Lofgren for Inhabitat

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IKEA’s Space10 is creating on-site aquaponic farms for restaurant supply

Your hot coffee could soon charge a phone with IKEA thermoelectric furniture

December 2, 2015 by  
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All around us, appliances, lighting, computers and even coffee cups radiate heat that dissipates into the air, unused. But what if we could capture that energy and transform it into electricity? A pair of design students at the Institute of Interaction in Copenhagen came up with the bright idea of installing thermoelectric technology into an IKEA table top. The table top could then use heat from a plate of hot food or a cup of coffee and change it back into electricity, which could be used to charge electronic devices. Read the rest of Your hot coffee could soon charge a phone with IKEA thermoelectric furniture

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