Sustainable renovation brings The Bailey Residence to life

January 24, 2022 by  
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In Black Butte Ranch, Oregon, The Bailey Residence is a nostalgic, sustainable renovation . Last updated in the 1970s, the 1,800-square-foot residential property has been reimagined by Oregon-based design firm Hacker. Now, The Bailey Residence is a renovated version of one of the original Country House Condos at Central Oregon’s Black Butte Ranch. The space was updated with a nod to the original design concept that includes a comforting mix of textures and colors. Related: 1903 New York house gets an eco-friendly makeover Retro style still rules the home, from the soapstone fireplace to bath tiles, but the colors have been updated to a more natural palette to reflect the lovely setting around the home. Designers discovered and exposed wood structural elements and highlighted them through the renovation, removing layers of decor that had covered them up. Goodbye carpet and drywall! The original interior features blue and buggy pine , which has been matched with all new wood elements added to the structure. “The exposed wood creates a rich natural pattern that is reminiscent of a cozy ranch cabin ,” Hacker said in a design statement, “and provides an elegant, understated backdrop throughout the entire home.” The designers stayed true to the home’s original spirit while updating it with sustainable elements and materials. The homeowners requested a renovation that prioritized flexibility and simplicity. The layout of The Bailey Residence is now simplified with more open spaces and more natural light . Further, prioritizing wood materials and original structures helps the renovation maintain a relatively small footprint. “Early in the design, the team discovered in the original drawings that a large window in the main living room space had been left out in the original construction ,” Hacker stated, “and they were able to incorporate this element back in through the renovation.” New built-in shelving and cabinetry feature heavily in almost every room, which reduces the need for furniture and allows for more efficient use of the space. + Hacker Images via Jeremy Bittermann

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Sustainable renovation brings The Bailey Residence to life

This green community immerses its residents in natural living

January 24, 2022 by  
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Living the Noom started with an idea: create a lifestyle option that met the needs of someone aiming to live an eco-friendly, wellness-centered lifestyle. Designed by Sanzpont (arquitectura) and Pedrajo + Pedrajo Architects , Living the Noom has won Architizer, Muse and Rethinking the Future awards for its innovative ideas. The first community applying Living the Noom concepts is in Cancun, Mexico . Living the Noom apartments look like giant bamboo bird cages bursting with green plantings. On top, shared roof decks boast deck chairs and community gardens where residents can grow food for the community or host a picnic. A pool sits on the axis between the apartment buildings, creating a natural landscape of green and blue. Related: Unique turtle bungalow encourages ecotourism in Thailand The idea here is simple. These homes are built to immerse residents in natural living, peace and quiet through the use of eco-friendly housing and green space. It will therefore create a full lifestyle centered around wellness-enhancing activities. The apartments are centered around the idea of creating community . It is also pet friendly. Pyramid-shaped shaded seating areas dot the pool where residents gather. There are also locations for practicing artwork, having a massage, doing yoga and working out in the open air. The open floor plan apartments can be configured according to residents’ needs. Modular furniture design helps reconfigure the space from bedroom to office to play area. LED lighting , solar panels , natural shading from the green terraces and a gray water system all help keep the community sustainable. + Living the Noom Images via Ali Garcia, Victor & Sergio Sanz, Jose Miguel Cano, Waldir Hernandez, Ismael Morales, Rodrigo Frias

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This green community immerses its residents in natural living

Canton Avenue harkens back to the Silk Road of China

January 21, 2022 by  
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The Canton Avenue by MOK Design for the Westin Pazhou Hotel in Guangzhou is a walk back in time, revisiting the days when the hotel was a stop on the historic Silk Road of China . The Westin Pazhou Hotel Guangzhou was jointly built by China Foreign Trade Center (Group) and Starwood Hotels and Resorts International Group. It is located in the center of the Guangzhou International Convention & Exhibition Center, with views of the city and the Pearl River. Entering in, the exhibition halls of the Canton Avenue can be reached through a sky corridor from the hotel directly. There are also a series of sunrooms and green space installations inside the hotel has integrated the renovated building into the surrounding landscape. Related: Grass-roofed arches and planted terraces bring nature into this modern bazaar in India A unique green lawn built into the lobby of the hotel brings daylight and air circulation indoors. There are also multiple floor and wall plantings that freshen the timeless design of the space. Central to the lobby is Canton Bazaar, an all-day garden restaurant and lobby bar combined with an outdoor sunroom. Decorated with mosaics and terrazzo floor, the sunroom was designed to combine a traditional and modern style. The space can accommodate up to 107 people for dining. Food in the Canton Bazaar follows a Cantonese food market theme. There are fresh ingredients reminiscent of the Canton Fair, the historical Maritime Silk Road, and the Lingnan culture of the Guangdong region. Most notable about the redesign is the use of green plants throughout, including the lobby and restaurant . The MOK Design team focused on both green spaces to create a healthy indoor environment and an update of the style to create a modern sleek take on the Silk Road. Details feature elements of porcelain, bronze and Cantonese embroidery. A hotel mosaic mural featuring ships sailing to port from around the world was originally created by contemporary artist Ms. Zhang Haiyan. She drew the manuscript of this mosaic mural with colored lead along with designer Li Yanfang. The manuscript was sent to an Italian mosaic factory to be used in the making of the wall mural. The main elements of the screen include: the Zhenhai Tower, bombax ceiba cotton-tree flowers, the harbor, Guangzhou Tower, merchant ships, seagulls and cloud patterns. It brings to mind the international sea trade that historically made this city a successful port. The hotel uses a neutral color palette and judicious use of quality ornamentation to evoke tranquility toward its visitors. There is thoughtful use of glass screens, greenery, marble and light and dark brown tones to balance the space. + MOK Design Photography by Zhang Jing and Weng Xiaodong

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Canton Avenue harkens back to the Silk Road of China

19th century Harlem house restored to be energy efficient

January 21, 2022 by  
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A 19th-century house, owners interested in passive house design and an architectural firm came together with a resulting blend of original elements married to modern innovations in a big-city row house. MESH Architectures led the design for this original Brownstone building in New York City . While the façade looks like others in the Harlem area, it’s been restored bottom to top. Walls and roofing are air sealed and insulated with ample blown-in cellulose insulation for energy efficiency . Related: The United States’ first Passive Plus House generates nearly all the energy it needs Inside, the cellar was converted into a home gym and media area. The main floor houses the kitchen and dining room that open into the back patio space. One floor up, the parlor level features the living room and library . The master bedroom and home office/guest room are located on the third floor, with four bedrooms on the fourth floor.  Each level was modernized with innovative HVAC systems that constantly filter air to provide fresh air for the residents. The systems are ultra energy-efficient, leaving behind a minimal environmental footprint.  Although brought up to date in terms of passive design standards, the team put significant effort into retaining elements of the original 1800s era home. The process involved repairing the extensive original woodwork around the windows, doors, stairs and fireplaces, while updating the home at the same time.  The hybrid interior design is seen throughout the space with fixtures that are a blend of new and historical. While the kitchen was completely remodeled for the modern era, some doors were recycled by relocating them in order to salvage them.  “This house is an integration of old and new. It is airy and clean, and it responds directly to the needs of a modern urban family,” said MESH Principal Eric Liftin. “We emphasized the social space of the kitchen/dining room/yard, while making a special effort to preserve the historical elements of the house. The house is full of recent building science technology, yet it feels like a serene, historic Harlem row house. We were happy to learn that the clients had already learned about passive house construction before we met them.” Although a row house by design, the retrofitting of energy-efficient technology stands as an example of what’s possible for home renovations in the name of zero-emission futures for both existing and new architecture.  + MESH Architectures  Photography by Frank Oudeman 

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Urban Forest is set to be the greenest residential building

January 21, 2022 by  
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Urban Forest designed by Koichi Takada Architects and developed by Aria Property Group received approval to be built in South Brisbane, Australia . The 20-storey building will house 194 apartments, all trimmed out with luscious vertical garden balconies. A large garden with walkways is planted under the open-sided street level of the building, creating a sort of walk-through botanical gardens for residents and pedestrians. Depending on the types of plants integrated into the final design, the Urban Forest could look like anything from a trim bonsai tree with the undulating, but neat, balconies wrapping the building on every side, to something more like the overgrown jungle temples of Cambodia. Related: Vincent Callebaut unveils bioclimatic LEED-Gold timber tower Additionally, the Urban Forest has columns beneath the building that are stacked in layers like a 3D-printed model and flow up into a base for the apartment levels of the building. Every balcony appears to be designed to be a slightly different shape or size than the one next to it, creating a natural, flowing effect that will complement the plantings. “By raising the podium, the ground level becomes an extension of the surrounding parklands, giving back to the community 1,642 square meters of public park ,” the designers said. A two-story rooftop clubhouse tops the residential building with phenomenal city views of Brisbane. The living façade features 550 trees and 25,000 plants selected from 251 native species. An information center in the lobby will include details on the design of the building and on plant biodiversity. The vertical gardens are designed to create shade and natural thermal and solar insulation for the apartment residents. The rooftop communal space has a swimming pool and other shared spaces for gathering. Its aim is to restore the idea of community and “breathing spaces” for social interaction and wellbeing to reduce the isolation of high-rise living. Koichi Takada Architects advocates for a more “living design” approach to building with the Urban Forest. It is set to be the world’s greenest residential building, targeting a 6-star Green Star rating. It will set a standard for sustainable and subtropical high-rise apartment buildings. “One takeaway from the COVID-19 pandemic crisis is the realization that we are all living things,” said Koichi Takada Architects. “We are here to live, not defy death in some way. Our architecture should do the same.” + Koichi Takada Architects Images via Binyan Studios

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Urban Forest is set to be the greenest residential building

Nokia Arena has touchless digital keys with mobile access

January 14, 2022 by  
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The new Nokia Arena in Finland just opened its doors last month, but only to those with special digital keys. The entire arena, designed by Polish Architect Daniel Libeskind, is wired with touchless digital access technology that make innovative use of new artificial intelligence security. Nokia Arena will host the 2022 Men’s Ice Hockey World Championships and other large events. Its round-the-clock opening hours are the perfect opportunity to test a new access management technology . Related: Nokia Working With UK Scientists to Charge Cell Phones With Lightning! The designers knew they needed not only a great arena , but one that made it possible to distinguish between people who needed employee access, hotel guest access or access to semi-public spaces. They brought in Abloy, an access management and control system company that created a unique touchless locking system for the arena. This is not only useful and efficient for a complex project, but follows a trend in healthier design in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and other pathogens that can spread at large venues. Abloy has also secured other large arenas, including Helsinki Olympic Stadium and the Warsaw National Stadium. “Nokia Arena is a striking example of security trends, where access rights are becoming digital and door environments are touchless,” said Jari Perälä, vice president, domestic sales and marketing, Abloy Oy. “In this development, various human resource, space and access management systems, for example, are integrated. They share information to improve operational efficiency and security . There has been a lot of discussion about the API economy (i.e. utilizing data shared through application programming interfaces, in recent years).” Along with electromechanical keys, Nokia Arena’s new security system allows doors to open with access rights on mobile devices or wristbands. This system allows the arena to respond to the wide array of access levels required to run the space 24/7. “We have introduced a wide range of keys,” said Jani Helenius, property and security manager at Nokia Arena. “Access permits can be sent to smart devices , in which case the door opens with the help of a mobile phone or smartwatch in the blink of an eye.” To anticipate safety in case of an emergency evacuation, the locks on the arena doors are integrated with the fire safety system. Smooth evacuation is also ensured by Abloy push bars that open the doors open quickly and easily when needed. “Simulations during the construction phase have shown that 4,500 people can be guided away from the main floor of the arena in less than eight minutes,” said Helenius. “The entire arena can be emptied in about 15 to 20 minutes, in an optimal situation. This would not be possible without effective opening mechanisms on the exit routes.” + Studio Libeskind Images via SRV / Aihio Arkkitehdit Oy and SRV/Libeskind/Tomorrow

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Nokia Arena has touchless digital keys with mobile access

UC Berkeley hatches a new talent pool for the food industry

January 13, 2022 by  
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Samantha Derrick’s Plant Futures symposium helps students get experience in the plant-based food sector and connecting startups in the space to young talent.

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UC Berkeley hatches a new talent pool for the food industry

Three myths about renewable energy and the grid, debunked

January 13, 2022 by  
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Renewable energy skeptics argue that because of their variability, wind and solar cannot be the foundation of a dependable electricity grid. But the expansion of renewables and new methods of energy management and storage can lead to a grid that is reliable and clean.

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House in Ecuador is hidden in a forest of carob trees

January 7, 2022 by  
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The Kaisen House by Rama Estudio in Ecuador is placed in a grove of carob trees in the middle of a slightly sloping landscape. It is intended to influence the natural environment in a minimal way. The designers explained, “[We] took advantage of the benefits of the shade thrown by each of the existing trees.” Kaisen House is a timber construction combined with a traditional local building style called bahareque, with air circulation built in and ample windows looking out on the surrounding natural environment . The house is designed with a minimal depth to create the smallest footprint and best views of the forest , as well as to affect the carob trees in the least amount possible. The house is implemented as a bar shape that is 7.50 meters wide and 24 meters long. Related: This prefab home expansion in Ecuador enjoys gorgeous views It’s shaped a bit like a shipping container home, with second-story balconies situated on top of doorways that open onto the grounds. Inside, the views from every angle of the house redirect the individual to look back to the outdoors at every chance. There are two wings to the house: service and family wings. In the family side of the house, the kitchen and the dining room are connected to a deck through a sliding screen that opens to the forest. A social area is connected through a deck with the dining room, encouraging outdoor use of the space and enhancing air circulation . In this wing there is also a multifunction room that connects to another patio. “On the second floor, under the same logic, there is an area with two bedrooms that open to the best view and a family area that is in complete relationship with the front forest,” the designers said. The traditional building technique called bahareque inspired the building’s enclosure by cane-style wood slats to create air circulation indoors. Materials used include laminated wood and metal, which was molded for use as a staircase, for balcony railings and floor plates. Kaisen House is at once completely modern and completely traditional in its layout and style. From every angle, it’s a fresh air experience. + Rama Estudio Photography by JAG Studio

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House in Ecuador is hidden in a forest of carob trees

Shopping mall design creates a balance with light and dark

December 24, 2021 by  
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The best architecture blurs the lines between the outdoors and the inside space, marrying together elements of nature at every interior turn. Developers from 10 Design kept this concept in the forefront while completing Jinwan Mall, a new lakefront shopping mall in Zhuhai. The 117,000 square meters Jinwan Mall covers all the bases for a modern shopping center with striking visual appeal and function. It’s nestled up to the edge of Jinsha Lake in Zhuhai, China , which gives visitors a chance to connect with the environment .  Related: Canada library reflects elements of parks and shopping malls Jinwan Mall is 10 Design’s second completed project on Huafa’s Jinwan Aviation City, along with the recently built Industrial Service Center and soon to be completed International Business Center. The massive mall undertaking was completed through a partnership of Ted Givens and Scott Findley. They designed it together with Project Partner Miriam Auyeung (COO), Project Leader Sonja Stoffels, and the entire architectural team made up of Peby Pratama, Joyce Lo, Vincent Fung, Yan Liu, Lufei Li, Wang Yang, Ruizhao Zhang and Echo Zhong.  The basis of the design comes from nature and is mirrored in the integration of a traditional courtyard garden into the contemporary space. In addition to the views of plants and lake, the campus incorporates the main mall, retail street and the waterside pavilions consisting of F&B and retail spaces with ample outdoor spaces. A glass canopy spine connects the retail street and the mall, which provides protection from the weather while moving between the spaces.  The striking façade represents the classic architecture of Chinese stacked stone walls and highlights unique and modern-day features such as the rhombi shapes inspired by the 4th-dimensional hypercube. In combination, the design creates a balance between dark and light, as well as massed areas with perforated panels and glass to provide natural light .  “Our design for Jinwan Mall transforms the regular shopping mall into an outdoor retail experience closely linked to nature, creating a new paradigm of how people experience retail spaces and bringing a new destination to Zhuhai’s Jinwan District,” said Design Partner Ted Givens. Jinwan Mall designers braced against road noise with a solid wall to buffer sound on the street side. By contrast, the waterfront side of the mall features endless rows of windows and accesses to the pedestrian-rich area that features areas for pop-up shops and performances. The views towards the mall present green terraces and lakefront gardens that transition visitors into the space.  “The Jinwan Mall development has been designed to maximize the nature and outdoor lifestyle of Zhuhai whilst tying it to the hypermodern concepts of discovery and exploration,” said Project Partner Miriam Auyeung (COO). “This new retail destination will provide the city with a public landmark that is inviting and accessible for all.” + 10 Design  Images via 10 Design 

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Shopping mall design creates a balance with light and dark

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