MIA Architecture’s office blends into the landscape with a mirrored facade

January 21, 2021 by  
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If ever there is a building type to emphasize dynamic appeal and make a statement, it should belong to an architectural firm. Standing true to this idea is the new office building for MIA Architecture, a firm located in Beaufays, Belgium. To articulate, MIA Architecture’s offices are actually an extension of an existing building, a home built in the 1970s. Expanding on the footprint of the home, the new addition honors the established height and also works with the same base of painted bricks and masonry heads. The project added an office as well as a meeting space and technical premises. Related: Bangkok’s Mega Park reimagines mega-malls as green community hubs If you approach the building from the front, you would barely notice it’s there, thanks to an ultimate harmonization with the heavily wooded environment. The exterior is framed in a “ mirror box ” that reflects the surrounding landscape, effectively cloaking the building from view. This ability to nearly disappear allows the unique office building to stand out while simultaneously blending into its environment. Windows are hidden behind the translucent skin (SGG Mirastar glass) and are only visible after dark, adding to the sci-fi effect. The design is remarkably discrete while making the entryway obvious with a metal grate walkway that seems to float above the ground. A wooden door materializes as visitors come closer toward the northwest corner of the building. Once inside, the oversized window provides views of the landscape, drawing the outside in and immersing the workspace into the gardens. The décor is minimalist with a streamlined black-and-white color palette. Beyond the look is the function, and MIA Architecture’s offices are constructed with efficiency in mind. The wood frame is filled with energy-saving insulation. Perhaps even more impressive than a nearly invisible facade is the technique used to construct the space in around three month’s time with low site-impact . + MIA Architecture Images via MIA Architecture

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MIA Architecture’s office blends into the landscape with a mirrored facade

Mint Tiny Homes Loft Edition model is full of natural light

January 13, 2021 by  
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For those who love the idea of a tiny home but hate the thought of feeling cramped inside a small space, the Loft Edition model from Mint Tiny Homes should definitely be on the radar. With three layout options and two sizes to choose from, this tiny home is super customizable. Best of all, there is a huge amount of natural light built into the design. The Loft Edition comes on either a 30-foot-long or 34-foot-long trailer with turnkey prices starting at $83,270 and $88,051, respectively. The 30-foot model spans 350 square feet, while the 34-foot model has an additional 36 square feet. Both options sleep four to six people comfortably. Related: Tiny House Sustainable Living blog documents life in an off-grid tiny home The Loft Edition tiny home kitchen comes with an oven and cooktop under a stainless steel hood fan as well as a full-sized, 24-inch-wide refrigerator and freezer. The kitchen also features a lovely ceramic apron front sink, cabinets, a butcher-block countertop, chrome faucets and laminate flooring. There is a full laundry hookup and a large shower with glass doors in the bathroom along with a 12,000 BTU mini split air conditioner and electric heating. The tiny house has plenty of storage in the cupboard staircase, and the full-sized loft allows for ample space in the downstairs lounge. Our favorite parts of this home are the windows, which line the upper part of the walls as well as the bottom to bring light into every corner. Customers can choose to install a skylight in the loft, giving the space even more natural light. A massive window opens from the living room, which helps to extend the sightline out toward the natural environment while also bringing in fresh air. French doors in the front give the Loft Edition tiny home a rustic yet elegant feel. The company also offers off-grid and sustainable features such as composting toilets and LED lighting. + Mint Tiny Homes Images via Mint Tiny Homes

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Japan to develop wooden satellite in bid to curb space junk

December 31, 2020 by  
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Japanese company Sumitomo Forestry is collaborating with Kyoto University to develop the world’s first wooden satellite. The two entities have already started research to determine the possibility of using wood in space. This research will test tree growth and wood use in extreme environments on Earth. If these tests are successful, the project hopes to introduce the wood-inspired satellite by 2023. According to Sumitomo Forestry, wooden satellites provide an ideal solution for reducing space junk. Space experts have warned about increased space junk caused by satellites. The World Economic Forum estimates that about 6,000 satellites are circling Earth, of which 60% are defunct. Satellites often launch into space for different uses. Unfortunately, once the satellites serve their purpose, they remain in space. These satellites slowly disintegrate, leaving alumina particles or other metals in the upper atmosphere. These pieces may stay in the atmosphere for ages. Besides atmospheric pollution, the satellites themselves pose a potential risk should they fall to Earth. According to Kyoto University researchers, wood satellites can disintegrate in space without producing life-threatening junk. Once a satellite has served its purpose, it will slowly fall apart, thus avoiding the creation of additional space junk. Takao Doi, a professor at Kyoto University, says that if action is not taken about space junk now, it will eventually affect Earth’s environment. “We are very concerned with the fact that all the satellites which re-enter the Earth’s atmosphere burn and create tiny alumina particles which will float in the upper atmosphere for many years,” Professor Doi said in an interview. Regarding the project’s next steps, he added “The next stage will be developing the engineering model of the satellite, then we will manufacture the flight model.” Research firm Euroconsult predicts that if all factors remain constant, approximately 990 satellites will be launched into space each year throughout the next decade. This means that we could have about 15,000 satellites orbiting Earth by 2028. Today, Elon Musk’s SpaceX has already launched more than 900 Starlink satellites into space, and the company plans to deploy thousands more. Without sustainability plans, these endeavors will likely contribute to the space junk problem. + BBC Image via Pixabay

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This modular prefab office space offers sustainable solutions

December 30, 2020 by  
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London studio Boano Prišmontas is no stranger to projects that highlight sustainable  workspaces . Once the pandemic hit, the need for affordable, easy-to-assemble remote work solutions became even more urgent. Enter “My Room in The Garden,” a low-cost prefab home office that can fit a yard of any size and takes less than a day to install. Although many countries around the world have already eased  COVID-19  lockdown restrictions, there are still a huge number of people working from home without a clear idea of when they’ll be returning to the office. Spouses are sharing spaces with their children, setting up makeshift desks in the living room or on the couch (not the best way to stay productive or comfortable during times of uncertainty). “My Room in The Garden” offers a great solution to workers who might not have the time or money to invest in long term changes to the home. Related: Work from home in this minimalist, modular 15-sided cabin Boano Prišmontas believes that the solution can be found outside the home rather than inside since many London houses have backyard gardens, courtyards, shared amenity spaces, pocket parks and even rooftops that provide additional space. The idea isn’t just for individuals, either, but for  businesses  wishing to reduce rent costs for big offices by purchasing home office pods for their employees instead. Basic modules start at £5K for 1.8×2.4 meters of space and can be customized according to need. All versions come at a fixed height of 2.5 meters — the max height of a structure that doesn’t require planning permission. The standard finish for the pods includes corrugated clear polycarbonate cladding to protect the interior from the elements while still allowing  natural light  to flood the space. Thanks to the modular design, the wall options range from peg wall finishes and mirrors to plain or decorated  wood , all according to the customer’s taste. Higher spec modules can include energy-efficient insulated walls, roofs or floor panels as well as glass doors or windows for an extra cost. Even better, each component of the home office is created with minimal material waste through geometrically efficient design. + My Room in the Garden Via Dwell Images via Boano Prišmontas

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Save energy and money with these eco-friendly tips for winter

December 30, 2020 by  
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Whether winter conjures thoughts of cozy fires and hot cocoa or trudging through snow and ice on the way to work, it’s essential to have a plan for coping with the season in a sustainable way. Here are some tips to saving energy, water and money while staying toasty and warm all winter long. Heat and electricity bills Not only will the bills add up as you bump up the heat, but so does energy consumption. Create a more Earth-friendly indoor environment by keeping your heating and electrical costs down. Remember the basics, like unplugging chargers and small appliances when not in use. Put your holiday and winter lights on a timer. Turn out the lights when you leave the room. Related: 7 eco-friendly insulation alternatives for a green home Add layers of clothing before heading to the thermostat. Bundling up can save you a bundle in heating costs. Also invest in a digital thermostat and set it to a lower temperature at night and while you’re away during the day. A simple way to spin more warm air into the living space is to flip the switch on the side of your ceiling fans. When they spin clockwise, they push warm air from the top of the room to the bottom. To really improve energy efficiency in your space, consider additional insulation around door and window openings, such rolled towels or a draft snake under door cracks, and an added layer of eco-friendly insulation in the attic, walls or basement. Maintain your furnace. Regular maintenance results in better efficiency and longevity for your home’s heat source. It’s always important to regularly replace your furnace filter, but make it a priority during the winter when the appliance is blowing more often. Snow and ice Depending on where you live, snow and ice may be part of your daily routine or only appear on occasion. When they do, avoid the chemical-laden deicers; use natural kitty litter or sand instead. Skip the gas-powered and polluting snow blowers. Instead, use an electric snow blower. Better yet, get the family out for a good old-fashioned snow removal with shovels and brooms. Water Many people focus on water savings during the summer, but few emphasize it during the winter when we’re not watering lawns. However, winter brings bulkier clothing that results in more laundry, the temptation for long showers or baths on cold days and the potential for broken pipes.  Check your water consumption by setting a timer for the shower and only run the washing machine and dishwasher when they are full. Turn off the water supply and winterize the automatic sprinklers, AC units and RV plumbing. Recycle the water you do use by cooling the pot of water after cooking pasta or by collecting water in the shower. Use this to water indoor plants. For an added layer of efficiency, add a water recycling system to your house where the laundry or shower can provide water for the toilet. Take advantage of rainy weather by having those rain barrels ready to collect and store water you’ll be using in a few months. Compost By the time gardening season rolls around, the compost from last summer will be ready to use. But you can continue to build your compost pile throughout the winter, too. It won’t break down as quickly as it does in the hotter months, but there’s no reason to trash tree trimmings, leaves or food scraps. If your compost pile is inaccessible, you can at least collect food scraps in a container in the freezer to add to the pile later. Transportation Slick roads and dangerous driving conditions make winter the perfect time to rely on public transportation. Dust off the bus pass or start using the subway and let someone else do the driving while reducing air pollution from carbon emissions.  If public transportation isn’t an option, do your part by ensuring your car is maintained. Change your oil along with cabin and engine air filters. Replace spark plugs, hoses and fuel filters at recommended intervals. Ensure that your tires are properly inflated. The more efficiently your car functions, the less gas it will require and the less emissions it will release. Waste When you’re ready to warm up with a hot cup of coffee or tea, opt to make your drinks at home in your reusable mugs. When you head for the store or if you shop online, be mindful of packaging. Find retailers that offer sustainable packaging options instead of plastic foam (like Styrofoam) and plastic . Remember your reusable produce and shopping bags when you head to the store or garden stand, so you can buy fresh fruits and veggies without the plastic waste . Efficient kitchens Keep your refrigerator running efficiently by vacuuming out the vents along the bottom. Deice your freezer if it doesn’t have an auto-defrost option. Keep the blender, coffee maker and toaster unplugged when not in use, and leave the oven door open after use to release the warm air into your home. Create a more sustainable coffee station by ditching the single-use plastic coffee pods in favor of a reusable version. Better yet, convert to a ceramic drip or French press, skipping the waste and composting the leftover coffee grounds. Winter is soup season , meaning it is the perfect time to use up a variety of vegetables and incorporate a meat-free dinner at least once each week. Stay cozy! Images via Pixabay and Unsplash

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Save energy and money with these eco-friendly tips for winter

The top 7 amazing tiny homes weve seen this year

December 24, 2020 by  
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2020 was certainly one for the history books. But among all of the negativity in the news throughout this past year, there were also plenty of innovative and creative design solutions to the world’s problems shining through. While a large portion of Americans adjusted to life working remotely and others faced economic struggles due to the pandemic, tiny homes and inventive office spaces have never been so relevant. True to form, tiny luxury also flourished, with some of the best designs of the year combining space-saving minimalism with luxurious creature comforts despite small square footage. Read on to learn more about the top seven tiny homes we’ve seen this year here at Inhabitat. Canada Goose Brought to us by Mint Tiny Homes, the Canada Goose is a gorgeous, rustic tiny home on wheels that will make you feel like you’ve walked into a minimalist’s sustainable farmhouse . With a spacious kitchen and bathroom, an entire area dedicated to a living room, and a full-sized bedroom on the gooseneck hitch, it is clear that the designers at Mint put a lot of thought into space utilization. Plus, we can’t get enough of the reclaimed barn doors and the dark wood accents to complement the bright white interior. Available in 38 and 41 feet, the Canada Goose fits three beds and can house six to eight people comfortably. Related: Tiny House Sustainable Living blog documents life in an off-grid tiny home LaLa’s Seaesta This quirky tiny house located only blocks from the beach has a design that’s just as clever as its name. Texas-based Plum Construction uses every inch of the property’s small square footage with a cute dining nook that converts into a sleeping area and a secret, hidden patio underneath. Just 410 square feet of space with an additional 80-square-foot loft inside, the home’s gable decoration is constructed from reclaimed cypress wood from a local house dating back 120 years. We think the best part of this property is the hidden patio, which takes advantage of the space left clear from the home’s stilts and features a hammock, a bar and an outdoor shower. The patio’s ventilated, slatted walls allows the ocean breeze to flow in. The Natura It might be enough for some sustainable design companies that the Natura tiny house is powered by 1000W-2000W rooftop solar panels, but not for U.K.-based The Tiny Housing Company. The firm goes several steps further by using natural materials such as cork and wood for the construction, as well as adding a wood-burning stove connected to underfloor heating, clean water filtration from an under-sink system, energy-efficient appliances and rockwool insulation (a rock-based mineral fiber composed of volcanic basalt rock and recycled steel or copper byproduct). The Kirimoko Looking at the interior of the Kirimoko in New Zealand, one would never guess that Condon Scott Architects would be able to fit all those amenities into a 322-square-foot footprint. This passive house boasts high-efficiency structural insulated panels paired with larch weatherboards to help keep out moisture as well as asphalt shingles and natural ventilation. This means the tiny home requires virtually no additional energy to keep temperatures comfortable in an unforgiving Central Otago climate. Characterized by a gable form, a black rain screen and massive windows, there is an abundance of natural light that makes this home look exceptionally bright and airy. Denali XL Denali XL, which is a larger version of Alabama-based Timbercraft Tiny Homes’ popular Denali model, features 399 square feet of floor space and a 65-square-foot loft. This tiny home may look like a rustic cabin from the outside, but once you cross the threshold, you’ll find a king-sized loft bedroom with powered skylights that open automatically on a timer or rain sensor, a large walk in closet, a luxurious steam shower and quartz countertops. Additional sustainable elements such as a trash compactor, high efficiency insulation and an incinerating toilet help earn this tiny home a spot on the list. Oasis Tiny House It’s easy to see how the Oasis Tiny House got its name. This 260-square-foot tiny home is located on the Big Island of Hawaii and features several luxurious touches that highlight the tropical ambiance of the space. An outdoor bar, for example, can be found directly below the curly mango wood kitchen window, designed to allow food and drinks to be passed through with ease. There is also a skylight in the bathroom to give the feel of an outdoor shower thanks to the home’s verdant jungle surroundings. The Oasis Tiny House is the creation of the sister-brother duo at Paradise Tiny Homes. The Culp A spa-like, walk-in hot tub is not something you’d expect to see inside of a 500-square-foot tiny home, but that didn’t stop Florida-based Movable Roots tiny home design company. When the client requested room for a soaking tub, the designers rose to the occasion and even added an incinerating toilet for good measure. The tiny home also has a galley kitchen and a primary bedroom with storage stairs leading up to dual loft spaces, which are naturally lit and spacious enough to be used as guest rooms, offices or storage. Another feature we love inside The Culp is its low-maintenance, two-tone metal exterior and the cork plank flooring.

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Organic and conventional meat production cause equal amounts of emissions

December 24, 2020 by  
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Research published in the journal Nature Communications  has revealed that the environmental impact caused by organically farmed meat is equal to that caused by conventionally farmed meat. The research was carried out to determine the exact cost of foods if their climate costs were accounted for. According to the researchers, the analyzed data should be used to set food prices and taxes that reflect the true costs of food. The research shows that the emissions caused by organically produced meat is similar to those from conventionally farmed meat. This is especially true for cattle and sheep. The researchers found the climate-related damage of raising organic chicken to be slightly worse than raising conventional chicken. On the other hand, organic pork was found to be slightly better in terms of emissions as compared to conventional pork. Related: Will gene editing and cloning create super cows that resist global warming? The research further revealed that if all climate-related costs were considered per food item produced, there would be a 40% increase in shop prices for conventional meat. At the same time, there would be a 25% increase in organic meat . This is not because organic meat causes less pollution but because it is already more expensive than conventional meat. The prices of conventional milk would rise by about 33% while that of organic milk would increase by at least 20%. The study, led by Maximilian Pieper of the Technical University of Munich, analyzed German food production alone. But researchers say that the results would likely be replicated in many other European countries. “We expected organic farming to score better for animal-based products but, for greenhouse gas emissions, it actually doesn’t make much difference,” Pieper said. “But in certain other aspects, organic is certainly better than conventional farming.” Meat produced either organically or conventionally pollutes the environment in many ways. Overuse of chemical fertilizers, pesticides and mishandling of manure are some of the ways in which food production is problematic. Meat consumption can also lead to health complications. Research carried out in 2018 revealed that a  20% tax increase  on red meat would be necessary to cover its associated health effects. + Nature Communications Via The Guardian Image via Pen Ash

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Organic and conventional meat production cause equal amounts of emissions

3 under-the-radar forces in food

December 18, 2020 by  
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3 under-the-radar forces in food Jim Giles Fri, 12/18/2020 – 01:00 Last week, I unpacked three hype-worthy trends shaping our food systems. Now I want to shine a light on three behind-the-scenes forces that aren’t generating headlines but should be. Let’s drive straight in. 1. Our two-tier food system The story: Online marketplaces that connect consumers with small-scale producers have boomed during the pandemic. Membership at Crowd Cow , a marketplace for craft meat and seafood, doubled in April alone. Thrive Market — tagline “healthy living made easy” — is closing in on 1 million members following a 50 percent jump this year . The backstory: This is good news from a sustainability perspective, because both companies provide additional sales channels for producers that practice organic and regenerative agriculture. They’re also using zero-waste commitments and new packaging technology to aggressively tackle the delivery sector’s waste problems. These achievements make me hope these companies prosper, but I’m unnerved at the fragmentation of food retail they represent. We’re seeing a surge in new sales channels that allow relatively wealthy consumers to make healthy and sustainable choices, but nothing like the same momentum elsewhere in the market. Convenience and dollar outlets remain the only food outlets in many low-income neighborhoods.  This is a (sadly familiar) failure of social justice. It’s also a problem for sustainability. We can’t create the food system we need — one that’s low-carbon and biodiversity-enhancing — if only one tier of that system delivers those benefits.  2. Ghost kitchens in the parking lot The story: Amazon disrupted retail by creating a marketplace for all sellers. Now something similar is happening in the restaurant industry, where a company named REEF is setting up and running kitchens in parking lots, which restaurants use to fulfill take-out orders. The restaurant specifies the recipe, REEF creates the dishes, and a delivery service (say DoorDash or Uber Eats) gets the meal to your maw. The backstory: This trend will bring changes both good and bad to the dining sector. I want to make the case that this consolidation of takeout infrastructure is also potentially a big deal for sustainability.  U.S. restaurants throw away more than 10 billion of tons of food every year, one reason why 6 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions come from food waste. One solution is to deploy a food waste tracking technology, such as Leanpath . That can be a challenge for small restaurants, but it makes more sense for a centralized operation such as REEF, which just raised $700 million . REEF’s hyper-local approach also lends itself to cargo bike deliveries. Although the company declined a request to discuss its broader sustainability strategy, it is experimenting with bikes: In May, it announced a pilot with delivery firm DHL that involves four electric bikes in the company’s hometown of Miami. 3. A rapid route to the right recipe The story: Kapor Capital and the Emerson Collective are among the funders behind Planet FWD, maker of Moonshot, a new climate-friendly snack brand . The backstory: Why have a bunch of well-known Silicon Valley investors backed a company that sells crackers? Well, Moonshot is a real product, but Planet FWD’s raison d’être is actually the software the company used to source ingredients for its snacks. The tool allows food brands to easily identify ingredients that meet key sustainability metrics, including low emissions. Rivals in this space include Latis and Journey Foods .  This kind of digital infrastructure is invisible to anyone outside of the food business, but until recently it’s been a missing piece of the sustainability jigsaw. Large retailers and brands can pressure suppliers to discuss environmental metrics, but smaller companies and startups don’t have the leverage. As a result, comparing the sustainability bona fides of different ingredients becomes very time-consuming. By solving this problem, services such as Planet FWD will act as an accelerant, allowing brands with ideas for new sustainable foods to get to market much quicker.  This article was adapted from the GreenBiz Food Weekly newsletter. Sign up here to receive your own free subscription. Topics Food & Agriculture Social Justice Featured Column Foodstuff Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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Bradley Plaza Green Alley: a new park for an old LA neighborhood

December 15, 2020 by  
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As the need for safe outdoor space is more pressing than ever, the Bradley Plaza Green Alley project has opened a new community park in an old industrial neighborhood of Los Angeles. What was once an alley surrounded by factories in Pacoima is now a vibrant space that features shade trees, ADA-accessible amenities and a stormwater management system. Project partners included LA Sanitation and Environment (LASAN), the Department of Public Works, Pacoima Beautiful, The Trust for Public Land and Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez. “I’m proud of our collaboration to deliver much-needed green space in Pacoima,” Rodriguez said. “This project showcases how we can design with both the community and environment in mind. Bradley Plaza and Green Alley brings together beautiful community gathering spaces, and engineering that will improve water quality and reduce local flooding during rainstorms. This effort will have long-term impacts and improve the quality of life in Pacoima.” Related: Floating islands bring a new type of public park to Copenhagen Planners expect Bradley Plaza Green Alley to improve the lives of many of the 8,500 residents who live within a 10-minute walk of the space. The alley is now a shared street that slows vehicles down while making room for walking and other outdoor activities. Bradley Plaza is a smaller part of the alley that is closed to vehicular traffic. The plaza features a shade structure, reclaimed wooden seating, a nature classroom and outdoor fitness equipment. Planners hope that all residents, especially children and families, will make use of this space. Builders emphasized the importance of giving community members a say in the finished space. “From the beginning of the project, local community members were engaged in the design process,” said Veronica Padilla, executive director of Pacoima Beautiful, “providing feedback on the plants and trees that now line the alleyway to the fitness equipment and benches installed in the Plaza.” They especially sought input from the Fernandeño Tataviam tribe, the former owners of this land, and incorporated the tribe’s language and art into the final project. In addition to once being an unsightly industrial alley, the site has had a problem with dirty stormwater, which often flooded the neighborhood. Now, thanks in part to landscape architects Rios Clementi Hale Studios, stormwater will drain into a series of planters, eventually releasing it into a subsurface infiltration trench. Drought-tolerant, low-water vegetation will filter the water enough so that it will replenish, rather than harm, the groundwater aquifer. The project relied on the expertise of the engineering firm Arup for stormwater management , as well as lighting design, sustainability consulting and other important aspects. “This is exactly the type of project LASAN loves to pursue and has cultivated a unique expertise in,” said Enrique C. Zaldivar, director and general manager of LASAN. “The important and often unseen work that stormwater infrastructure does in our communities , reclaiming water and preventing flooding, can and should be paired whenever possible with other complete street projects that beautify neighborhoods and provide green space for residents.” + Arup Via Informed Infrastructure Images via the Trust for Public Land

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Our favorite environmental TikTok channels

December 15, 2020 by  
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TikTokers aren’t just young, fashionable and good at lip-synching and skits. More and more users of the social media platform are on a campaign to save the world. Originally called music.ly and used for sharing user-generated music videos, the platform is now popular with people sharing sustainability tips, promoting veganism and talking about their concerns for the future of the planet. TikTok now has about 850 million active users. Eco-themed hashtags like “moss”, “ biodiversity ”, “zero waste” and “sustainable fashion” have gained millions of views. With so many channels and hashtags on the TikTok app, it can be hard to sift through the noise to find the eco-friendly content. Here are a few of our favorite environmental TikTok channels to keep on your radar. Related: 14 apps to help you live a more sustainable lifestyle @eco_tok who else is on team anti-grass lawns? creator: @caseyc0w #antigrasslawntiktok #environment #grass ? original sound – Kaitlyn eco_tok The environmental collective EcoTok has become very popular on TikTok. EcoTok was co-founded by 27-year-old Philip Aiken, whose special interest is  soil  restoration. During lockdown he started the collective with other young creators. “I see it as like planting seeds, and hopefully that germinates and that person wants to learn more,” Aiken said . His fans constantly message him about sustainability and gardening. Aiken is U.S.-based but earned a master’s degree in renewable energy in New Zealand. “It’s been cool being able to influence the younger generation in that way,” Aiken said. @iamtabithabrown Vegan shrimp for the lunch win!!! #tabithabrown #veganshrimp ? original sound – Tabitha Brown iamtabithabrown Tabitha Brown is an actor who has been in the spotlight for years but became a TikTok sensation this year for her vegan-focused videos. Her channel features funny and inspirational messages and, of course, mouth-watering vegan dishes that you’ll want to whip up in your own kitchen. @diysustainability #upcycle #diy #tshirtupcycle #sustainability #diysustainability #lesswaste #fyp ? Ashes – Stellar diysustainability DIY Sustainability’s 32.9K followers tune in to find entertaining and easy projects to do at home with old stuff. Have you ever wanted to learn to make a haunted house out of old moving boxes? Or to learn to weave baskets out of plastic yarn? Does your guinea pig yearn for new toys made out of old toilet paper rollers? This is the TikTok channel for you. @last20pavement Almost all glass materials can be infinitely recycled🙌 #doyourpart #sustainability #recycle #environment ? Deep End – Fousheé last20pavement The young Canadian behind last20pavement posts jokes and environmental raps, like: “I’m an environmentalist, but I do get pissed, when people walk around the Earth like they don’t give a shit. I’ve got my reusables. Aren’t they pretty neat? Not to flex, but I also don’t eat any meat.” This is a good channel to follow if you’re interested in veganism and recycling . @mvvvc I want a 3D printed building so bad #engineering #3dprinting #concrete #civilengineer #earth #soil ? Heart Of Glass (Live from the iHeart Festival) – Miley Cyrus mvvvc This civil and structural engineer contemplates alternative building materials, high-speed rail, green roofs , politics and the occasional engineering joke. Mvvvc also shows off some incredible examples of architecture around the world. @vismcandleco Someone keeps leaving empty Tito’s Vodka handles around 🤷🏽‍♂️, so let’s UPCYCLE! #candlemaking #upcycle #reuse #recycle #sustainability #dranks #me ? Woohoo – Kirsten Collins jtdrbeauty Jacob Tomás del Rosa is a proud candle enthusiast and upcycler who finds ways to turn many surprising things into candles. If you’re about to throw your old vodka bottles into the recycling, hold on. In a one-minute video, del Rosa will show you how to turn that bottle into a chartreuse green candle instead. You’ll also find helpful tips for safely sanding wine bottles into soft candle holder rims without breathing in tiny pieces of glass. @ethica.clothing Quit Fast Fashion, Join the Revolution #thrift #upcycle #sustainable #ethicalfashion #ethicalfashionbrand #sustainablefashion #secondhand ? Lovely Day – Bill Withers ethica.clothing This is a TikTok channel for the online store Ethica Thrift . The account’s 182K followers eagerly await the next drop of seasonally appropriate, upcycled and thrifted clothes in addition to videos covering environmental facts. @brightly.eco What are some bedroom swaps you’ve made? #ecofriendly #ecofriendlyproducts #zerowaste #zerowasteliving #antiquestore #thrifting #GrowUpWithMe #bedroom ? The Journey – Sol Rising brightly.eco Learn about everything from the benefits of earthships to how to live a zero-waste lifestyle via the brightly.eco channel . We love the Old Me, New Me series, which features simple, affordable (even free!) swaps you can make at home to be more sustainable. @epicgardening pro seed starting tip #garden #tiktokpartner #learnontiktok ? Ice Dance (From “Edward Scissorhands”) – Ashton Gleckman epicgardening Looking for garden inspiration? Hoping to learn more about starting seeds and composting? Check out epicgardening , a verified TikTok account that offers plenty of gardening advice using a real-life backyard garden influenced by the video game Stardew Valley. Image via Kon Karampelas

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