Global warming is uncovering toxic pollutants from an abandoned Arctic military base

August 8, 2016 by  
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A decommissioned U.S. military base encased in the Greenland Ice Sheet since the 1960s is slowly being unearthed by Earth’s rising temperatures, along with the toxic waste stored inside. Snowfall is not able to keep up with melting ice on top of the Cold War-era base, which could mean the underground pollutants could enter marine ecosystems by the end of the century. Camp Century was built in 1959 to study construction methods in harsh, wintry conditions, but also with the intent of being a within-reach nuclear launch site against the Soviet Union. Even though the latter never panned out, the “city under the ice” was still powered by a nuclear reactor and currently houses thousands of liters of toxic waste. Related: Greenland’s ice is melting faster than previously thought A study published in Geophysical Research Letters determined that the snowfall covering the area may not be able to keep up with the rate of melting ice . By 2090 the rates could reverse, meaning, “it’s only a matter of time before the wastes melt out; it becomes irreversible,” stated study author and climate scientist at Toronto’s York University William Colgan. Even though the nuclear reaction chamber was removed when Camp Century was decommissioned in 1967, an estimated 53,000 gallons of diesel fuel, 63,400 gallons of waste water (including radioactive coolant), and an infrastructure containing toxic polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) remains. Unfortunately, a clean-up initiative would be too costly to undergo until a significant amount of the ice melts. This gives the U.S. and Greenland time to figure out who is responsible for the job. Via New Atlas Images via  Flickr , Wikimedia

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Global warming is uncovering toxic pollutants from an abandoned Arctic military base

Petey Ulatans cubic landscapes reimagine the world full of sharp angles

August 8, 2016 by  
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Ulatan’s artistic interpretation of the world as a cube is not the same treatment as taking other round objects and making them cubic, such as the cube-shaped watermelons grown in Japan. Rather, his vision reflects something closer to science fiction, where Earth’s corners face inward to create exceptionally geometric valleys that defy gravity. Ulatan, who unveiled his cubist world in a series of curious images on Instagram , bends a number of familiar scenes at 90-degree angles, making for some very interesting—and head turning—possibilities. Related: Artist uses spider webs to create spellbinding cubes of eerie art The squared-off world of Ulatan’s creations takes everything we know about the Earth’s physical attributes and turns them, well, sideways. A sailboat can now not only glide along the water’s surface, but can also take a 90-degree turn up or down. Smoke flowing up from a factory’s stacks might spew from two different planes, intersecting at a sharp angle. A relaxing day by the lake may require folks to crane their neck in order to get a view across the water, as the vantage point reaches straight down from a drop-off. Ulatan’s cubic world doesn’t need to explain its bizarre physics or impossible gravity . It doesn’t require an explanation of how its shape came to be. Rather, his series of manipulated images serves a more esoteric purpose, which is to inspire people to look at the world in a different way. + Petey Ulatan’s website + Petey Ulatan on Instagram Via Architectural Digest Images via Petey Ulatan

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Petey Ulatans cubic landscapes reimagine the world full of sharp angles

The Iron Curtain Stopped Invasive Species

January 8, 2010 by  
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Image credit: duluoz cats /Flickr At the end of Word War II, the proverbial “Iron Curtain” fell between Western Europe and the Soviet Union. The barrier, which was as much a real obstacle—defended by soldiers and tanks—as it was a symbolic divide, prevented travel, trade, and communication between the two halves of the continent

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The Iron Curtain Stopped Invasive Species

CES 2010 – Wretched Excess Dept: Bathroom Mirror Televisions and $40,000 Cyborg Workstations

January 8, 2010 by  
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I know, I know…

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CES 2010 – Wretched Excess Dept: Bathroom Mirror Televisions and $40,000 Cyborg Workstations

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