These colorful glamping pods are tucked into a South Korean mountain range

July 3, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on These colorful glamping pods are tucked into a South Korean mountain range

South Korean firm  Atelier Chang has installed a series of colorful glamping pods in a remote South Korean mountain range. Tucked deep into a green cypress forest, the contemporary pods that make up the SJCC Glamping Resort are designed for travelers who want to enjoy exploring Suncheon Ecological Bay, a beautiful coastal area 300 kilometers south of Seoul. The 16 glamping pods were built with steel frames and covered with brightly-colored fabric in shades of fuchsia, bright green and powder blue. The fabric is durable enough to insulate the structures year-round, even in wintertime. The area is known for its bitter winters, but the coverings, as well as the rounded shapes of the pods, help resist strong winds and snow loading. Related: Alterra beach resort uses shipping containers for private glamping cabins According to the architects, each of the colorful pods was strategically orientated to provide stunning views of the forest and the sea in the distance. “We wanted guests to feel as if they are living deep in the forest – directly in touch with the natural environment rather than being disconnected from it, as is the case with many ‘destination’ resorts,” said Soohyun Chang, founder of Atelier Chang. On the interior, guests can enjoy a rather large glamping layout of approximately 164 square feet. The pods feature an open-plan living area with a kitchen and bathroom. Each pod has two comfortable beds. To minimize the resort’s impact on the natural landscape, each pod has a wooden deck, which is raised off the ground by multiple piles. When not enjoying peaceful hikes around the property, guests can make their way to the clubhouse and restaurant. The bright white building, which sits at the center of the resort, was made using the same steel and fabric construction techniques. Its zig-zagged facade opens up into a large deck that looks out over the forest. + Atelier Chang Via Dezeen Images via Atelier Chang

Original post:
These colorful glamping pods are tucked into a South Korean mountain range

This humble home in South Korea features an observation tower for amazing views

December 29, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This humble home in South Korea features an observation tower for amazing views

Imagine buying a plot of land with a stellar view for your future home, only to see the construction of multi-family developments on the neighboring sites, threatening to block out the dreamy scenery. That’s exactly what happened to ON Architecture ’s client near Gimhae, South Korea. In order to preserve scenic views of the nearby city, while fulfilling the client’s desire to have a small home, the architects devised Tower House, a unique modern structure with an unexpected vertical element in the form of a raised gallery. From there, the homeowner can soak up the precious view, unscathed by nearby developments. Tower House was designed by ON Architecture and built in 2015. The home sits just outside the city of Gimhae in South Korea ’s South Gyeongsang Province, in the southeastern corner of the country’s main island. Designing a small house that could compete with neighboring multi-family dwellings was a challenge, but the architects carefully crafted a plan that would give their client everything they wanted, and possibly more. Related: Parametrically designed Louverwall house maximizes winter sunlight To provide a place for cityscape-gazing, the architects devised an observation tower that would hold the home’s living room. Additionally, a connected foyer serves as a vertical gallery where the homeowner can display their ornamental rock collection and potted plants. The resulting foyer is the centerpoint of movement inside the house, linking all the individual rooms. ON Architecture’s client requested a small house, despite the spacious plot of land they had to work with. In response, the architects created a corresponding outdoor space for each room of the house, thereby stretching the usable area and facilitating a kind of communication between the indoors and the outside world. To achieve this goal, the home’s overall footprint was designed in an X configuration, maximizing the opportunity for “in-between spaces” outdoors that can be used independently. The positioning of the rooms within the house puts the living room and master bedroom on the south-facing wall, ensuring those spaces would be flooded with natural light during the day. Tower House also features a terrace, in front of the living room, inspired by Numaru, a Korean traditional loft floor structure. + ON Architecture Via Architizer Images via ON Architecture

Originally posted here: 
This humble home in South Korea features an observation tower for amazing views

Solar-powered Farm From a Box is a compact farm kit that feeds 150 people

December 28, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered Farm From a Box is a compact farm kit that feeds 150 people

Two acres of land is enough to farm a sustainable food supply for as many as 150 people, and now a San Francisco startup is making it even easier to get that farm growing. Farm From a Box is a shipping container kit that holds all the essentials for setting up a two-acre farm (except the land, of course). Founders Brandi DeCarli and Scott Thompson got the idea after working on a youth center in Kenya where shipping containers were being used to substitute where infrastructure lacked. That project didn’t address food insecurity , though, which led DeCarli and Thompson to found their own venture specifically for that purpose. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlcijvWRJGU Farm From a Box is a kit designed to make it easier for all types of organizations to start growing sustainable food . Nonprofit humanitarian agencies, schools, community groups, and even individuals can buy a $50,000 kit, which comes with a complete water system including a solar-powered pump and drip irrigation system. Together, those features help conserve water by using it more efficiently, delivering water directly to the roots of growing plants. All of the kit’s components are solar-powered, so the kit also includes 3 kW of solar energy capacity which is enough to power the water pump as well as WiFi connectivity that makes it possible to monitor the farm conditions remotely. Because the built-in solar power technology generates more than enough energy to power the farm’s equipment, the farm is suitable to run completely off the grid. Related: Top 10 cities in the US for urban farming All the prospective farmer needs to have is viable land, of course, and seeds. Luckily, the Farm From a Box team realizes that farming is largely about skill and science, so the kit also includes three stages of training materials on sustainable farming, farm technology and maintenance, as well as the business of farming. In a recent interview with Smithsonian Magazine, DiCarli explained that the farm kit was designed to “act as a template” and that it’s possible to “plug in” components that specifically fit the farm’s local climate and the farmers’ needs. Those options include internal cold storage, to help preserve crops between harvest and consumption or sale, and a water purification system, if needed. So far, Farm From a Box has deployed one prototype at Shone Farm in Sonoma County, California. A project of Santa Rosa Junior College, the farm is part of a larger outdoor laboratory in which students learn how to cultivate crops in drought conditions, and then the harvest is used to supply the farm’s own community-supported agriculture (CSA) program as well as the college’s culinary arts program. DiCarli said the Shone Farm prototype turned out to be “more efficient than we had even planned,” with “really high” production and energy output. Farm From a Box has a number of other potential sites lined up already, in Ethiopia, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan, as well as additional test farms in California and a veteran-partnered site in Virginia. Via Smithsonian Magazine Images via Farm From a Box

View original here: 
Solar-powered Farm From a Box is a compact farm kit that feeds 150 people

Moon Hoon’s Go Mir is a dragon-inspired vacation home, bed and breakfast, and cafe in one

February 18, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Moon Hoon’s Go Mir is a dragon-inspired vacation home, bed and breakfast, and cafe in one

Read the rest of Moon Hoon’s Go Mir is a dragon-inspired vacation home, bed and breakfast, and cafe in one Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: black and red homes , dragon building , go’s dragon , home with outdoor staircase , homes that look like dragons , island vacation home , korean architecture , multipurpose spaces , south korea architecture , south korean design

More:
Moon Hoon’s Go Mir is a dragon-inspired vacation home, bed and breakfast, and cafe in one

Lush Curvaceous Green Wall Grows in iArc Architects’ New Seoul City Hall

December 17, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Lush Curvaceous Green Wall Grows in iArc Architects’ New Seoul City Hall

Read the rest of Lush Curvaceous Green Wall Grows in iArc Architects’ New Seoul City Hall Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green wall” , “living wall” , City Hall , ecofriendly plaza , iarc architects , multipurpose building , natural light , seoul city hall , seoul plaza , solar heat gain , South Korean architecture , south korean city hall        

Original post:
Lush Curvaceous Green Wall Grows in iArc Architects’ New Seoul City Hall

LG is Developing a Waterless Washing Machine!

April 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on LG is Developing a Waterless Washing Machine!

LG is rumored to be creating a washing machine that doesn’t use water. It is known that South Korean firm plans to focus on next-generation  smart appliances next year, and is already working on several cutting-edge designs. Reporting rumors of what could be an exceptionally efficient washer, Engadget said the company remains tight-lipped about the new washing machine project—currently in the early stages of development—and that LG would not confirm if it is to be completely waterless, or “virtually waterless.” Read the rest of LG is Developing a Waterless Washing Machine! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , CES 2013 , Energy-Efficient Appliances , Green Appliances , LG home appliances , LG robo-vacuum , LG waterless washing machine , refrigerator design , smart appliances , sustainable appliances , washing machine design , water usage        

See more here: 
LG is Developing a Waterless Washing Machine!

Eco-Luxe Treehouses at Ngong House Provide an Epic “Out of Africa” Experience

April 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Eco-Luxe Treehouses at Ngong House Provide an Epic “Out of Africa” Experience

Read the rest of Eco-Luxe Treehouses at Ngong House Provide an Epic “Out of Africa” Experience Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “natural materials” , bespoke tree house , boutique hotel , eco-luxe , giraffes , kenya , Luxury Tree House , Meryl Streep , nairobi , Nairobi National Park , Ngong House , Out of Africa , Rothschild giraffe , safari destination , Treehouses , upcycling        

More here:
Eco-Luxe Treehouses at Ngong House Provide an Epic “Out of Africa” Experience

New Korean LED Lighting System Is Inspired By The Bioluminescence of Fireflies

November 1, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New Korean LED Lighting System Is Inspired By The Bioluminescence of Fireflies

In another fantastic example of biomimicry, a team of South Korean scientists is studying fireflies in an effort to develop a better, less expensive LED lens. The team’s research sees them essentially mimicking the insect’s bioluminescent organ for lighting applications. It is hoped that by studying and duplicating the structure of a firefly’s underbelly, the team will be able to produce more efficient and cheaper LED lighting . Read the rest of New Korean LED Lighting System Is Inspired By The Bioluminescence of Fireflies Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bioluminescence , fireflies , Firefly , green lighting , LED lens , LED lighting , LEDs , nanomoulding , nanostructures , south korean

Originally posted here:
New Korean LED Lighting System Is Inspired By The Bioluminescence of Fireflies

LivingHomes Announces Launch of Three New Prefab Eco-Luxe LEED Platinum Models

November 1, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on LivingHomes Announces Launch of Three New Prefab Eco-Luxe LEED Platinum Models

LivingHomes has just announced the launch of yet three more prefabricated LEED Platinum-worthy homes . The CK4, CK5, and CK7 homes are all based on the the C6  – the first affordable LivingHome introduced earlier this year — and they are modeled for urban infill lots. Better yet, CK homes are cheaper to build than conventional homes in cities such as LA, San Francisco and New York. Two of the three homes are modern double stories and all of them can be constructed within two months and assembled on site within one day. Read the rest of LivingHomes Announces Launch of Three New Prefab Eco-Luxe LEED Platinum Models Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: c6 , CK series , eco design , Eco-Luxe home , green design , LEED platinum , livinghomes , Modern Homes , Prefab , sustainable design

View original here:
LivingHomes Announces Launch of Three New Prefab Eco-Luxe LEED Platinum Models

Solar- and Geothermal-Powered Guthrie Green Park Replaces an Old Truck Loading Facility in Tulsa

November 1, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Solar- and Geothermal-Powered Guthrie Green Park Replaces an Old Truck Loading Facility in Tulsa

The site of the new Guthrie Green Park was once a 2.7-acre truck loading facility – essentially a concrete jungle. Now it’s a green oasis and community gathering space offering gardens, interactive fountains, outdoor stage with vine-covered ‘green rooms’, a multi-purpose lawn for performances and festivals, and an 11,200-square-foot cafe pavilion. Designed by the Sausalito, CA office of SWA Group , the park sits across the street from the new Woody Guthrie Archives, which used to be the former Tulsa Paper Company Building. Both projects were funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation as part of an urban revitalization program in the Brady Arts District. “SWA designed and helped our community develop a magnificent gathering space in the center of a once-forgotten part of downtown Tulsa which is now thriving with arts, music, great food and celebration on almost every day of the week,” said Ken Levit, Executive Director of the George Kaiser Family Foundation . “The park—known as Guthrie Green—almost instantly became “the place to be” on any given sunny day in our city.” The park is more than just a fun place to play and cool off when its hot. Guthrie Green is also a giant geothermal sink with a ground-source heat pump system buried under the park. After removing the concrete pad, 120 wells were drilled to 500 ft depth as part of the ‘geo-exchange’ system, which generates 600 tons (7.2 million BTU/hour) of heating/cooling distributed via underground pipes to serve 120,000 square feet of nearby non-profit users as well as the cafe pavilion and bathrooms. Photovoltaic panels on the pavilion roof supply power for the heat pump system. The system reduces energy use by 60% with investment payback in five to seven years. Elizabeth Shreeve, principal of SWA Group, the project designer told us, “Tulsa’s new Guthrie Green demonstrates the power of city parks to catalyze revitalization, generate innovative sources of energy, and maximize the benefits of effective private-public partnerships.” + SWA Group + George Kaiser Family Foundation Images ©Jonnu Singleton / SWA

Read more:
Solar- and Geothermal-Powered Guthrie Green Park Replaces an Old Truck Loading Facility in Tulsa

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 950 access attempts in the last 7 days.