This kinetic installation uses sound to visualize the worlds CO2 emissions

February 7, 2018 by  
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The CarbonScape installation by Chinese artist Chris Cheung (aka h0nh1m) , mimics the sounds of jet engines, ship horns, steam, chimneys, and other carbon emitters, blending them together into an immersive soundscape .  The sounds are visualized by a bamboo forest-like field of tubes and black ‘carbon’ balls. The result is a piece of art that speaks to the effects of fossil fuel use and industrialization on our planet. The kinetic soundscape installation consists of 18 tracks of synthesized sound samples. The artist collected these noises from the sound sources where a  carbon footprint is left, for example, the sound from the jet engine, steam from a factory or the horn of the ship. These tracks are blended into a unified soundscape. As the sounds are emitted, black balls rise and fall to represent the carbon in a particular part of the planet. Related: Amazing Hive comes alive with sights and sounds in Washington, D.C. CarbonScape uses data acquired from the NOAA ( National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ) to help bring the visualization to life. According to their findings, in 2017 the concentration of CO2 soared to its highest of the past three million years. The data show that this increase can be largely attributed to industrialization and the use of fossil fuels . + h0nh1m ? CarbonScape (PV) from h0nh1m on Vimeo .

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This kinetic installation uses sound to visualize the worlds CO2 emissions

Australian researchers store light as sound for the first time

September 18, 2017 by  
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Photonic computers could run 20 times quicker than today’s laptops if microchips could process data in speedy photons. Now, they might be able to. For the very first time, researchers from two Australian universities have found a way to store light waves as sound waves in a microchip – a breakthrough that brings us closer to the super-fast computers of the future. Light-based computers could revolutionize computing. They won’t generate heat , or use as much energy as today’s computers. Light-based information sent across cables today is converted into electrons, which are slow, but storing light waves as sound waves allows the information, which computer chips can still read, to travel more quickly. Normally, light would pass through a microchip in two to three nanoseconds, but when it’s stored as sound, it can remain on a chip for an additional 10 nanoseconds, allowing data to be processed. Related: Newly discovered form of spiralized light breaks everything quantum physics says about photons The animation above breaks down the process. Photonic data enters the microchip as a yellow light pulse, and interacts with what’s called a write pulse that’s blue. That generates an acoustic wave where the data is stored. Then, another light pulse, called the read pulse, accesses the data stored in the acoustic wave and transmits it as light. Project supervisor Birgit Stiller of the University of Sydney said in a statement, “The information in our chip in acoustic form travels at a velocity five orders of magnitude slower than in the optical domain. It is like the difference between thunder and lightning.” Their system also works on a broad bandwidth, so Stiller said they can store and retrieve information at different wavelengths at the same time. The journal Nature Communications published the research online today. Two researchers from Australian National University joined three from the University of Sydney for the study. Via ScienceAlert and Phys.org Images via PublicDomainPictures.net and Louise Connor/University of Sydney

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Australian researchers store light as sound for the first time

New study shows a 1-in-20 chance climate change will cause a complete societal collapse

September 18, 2017 by  
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Most of the world’s human population, and the health of ecosystems across the planet, could face an existential threat by the end of the century if rapid, forceful action is not taken to combat climate change . According to a new study published in  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , there is now a 1-in-20 chance that climate change will cause an “existential/unknown” warming effect, defined in the study as a global temperature rise of 5 degrees Celsius over pre-industrial levels, that would have a devastating impact on humanity while wiping out 20 percent of life on Earth. Even as climate change is apparent in the present, its worst impacts will be felt by future generations. “To put in perspective, how many of us would choose to buckle our grandchildren to an airplane seat if we knew there was as much as a 1 in 20 chance of the plane crashing?” said co-author Veerabhadran Ramanathan of University of California San Diego. “With climate change that can pose existential threats, we have already put them in that plane.” In addition to the 5 percent chance of complete societal, and perhaps species, collapse, the scientists estimate that, if action is not taken, there is a 50 percent chance of a 4 degree temperature rise by 2100, far surpassing the 2 degree goal set by the Paris accord. Related: Caltech scientists speed up carbon sequestration process by 500 times The study is not all doom and gloom. The scientists describe several actions that can and must be taken, including achieving peak global emissions by 2020 and carbon neutrality by 2050, ending the use of short-term climate pollutants like hydrofluorocarbons , and removing carbon and other greenhouse gases from the atmosphere through sequestration , reforestation and other methods. The study was utilized by 33 policy and science experts in crafting a related report which further details actions that can be taken now. Whether the advice will be taken remains to be seen. Via Scientific American Images via Christopher Michel and Ian D. Keating

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New study shows a 1-in-20 chance climate change will cause a complete societal collapse

Blind "bird man" of Uruguay recognizes 3000 unique bird songs

June 13, 2016 by  
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In the warmer seasons and biomes of the Earth, birds envelop the sonic landscape with uniquely composed songs and calls that identify the species present, even if unseen. Bioacoustics and ornithological expert Juan Pablo Culasso has so refined his ability to recognize these sounds that he is now able to differentiate between 720 species of birds by ear. 29-year-old Culasso was born blind, though able to sense changes in light, and has always relied on his ears to explore the world around him. Culasso also possesses the rare gift of absolute, or perfect, pitch, which enables him to identify a particular note simply by hearing it. Through his unique abilities, Culasso can identify over 3,000 unique bird sounds. Perfect pitch is less about the ear than it is about the brain’s capacity for identification and interpretation. “It’s not that these people hear more, they hear the same as anyone else,” says Alicia Munyo, head of the phonology department at Republica University in Montevideo, Uruguay. “It’s that their brain has a great capacity to interpret sounds and their nuances, much more than normal people do.” Culasso recalls his perfect pitch in childhood, in which he could identify the musical note for sounds made by stones tossed into the water. His father introduced his young son to the world of birds by reading aloud encyclopedia articles that were accompanied by audio cassettes of bird sounds. Related: Shocking study reveals 90% of seabirds have eaten plastic Culasso, encouraged by field work with an ornithologist, began recording bird sounds as a teenager. “At that moment, I felt as if I had been doing this forever without knowing it. I fell in love with that task,” he says. Culasso has used his skills to produce nature documentaries, assist scientific studies, and in 2014, was granted a $45,000 prize from Nat Geo TV. Most of this money was invested in audio equipment, so that Culasso can better complete his work. He also recently completed a two month expedition in Antarctica. “I keep adding sounds to my list,” he says. “In Antarctica, I recorded sea lions, seals and a melting iceberg.” Via Phys.org Images via Juan Pablo Culasso  and Flickr

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Blind "bird man" of Uruguay recognizes 3000 unique bird songs

Tips for hiding sustainability reporting from interested stakeholders

September 18, 2015 by  
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Don’t miss this sound, serious advice from a sustainability professional on how to be nefarious.

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Tips for hiding sustainability reporting from interested stakeholders

Princeton University Scientists Use a 3D Printer to Create a Bionic Ear

May 3, 2013 by  
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Princeton University scientists have invented a new medical device that would have Ridley Scott nodding in recognition. By using live cells and metal nanoparticles, the researchers were able to use a 3D printer to create a bionic ear with an integrated coil antenna. The fully-functioning organ receives radio waves, and it could potentially improve upon the human body’s sense of hearing. Read the rest of Princeton University Scientists Use a 3D Printer to Create a Bionic Ear Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printer , antenna , bionic ear , cartilage , cells , hearing , michael mcalpine , nano letters , nanoparticles , Princeton university , radio waves , ridley scott , Sound , tissue        

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Princeton University Scientists Use a 3D Printer to Create a Bionic Ear

Top four iPhone speakers that don’t need additional electricity

September 22, 2011 by  
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Pratik Basu: Koostik iPhone Speakers When it comes to iPhone speakers, we mostly prefer electricity-free options. Not only does it excludes the hassles of not having miles of wiring lying messed up on the floor, but it also makes it easy to carry along and be used outdoors. The speaker which does not need additional electricity usually utilizes the iPhone’s speakers and amplifies the sound through unique acoustic designs of the body itself to boost the sound to almost four times the sound offered by the iPhone’s speaker. Many unique designs have come up in the market. Here’s a look at some interesting iPhone speakers that don’t need additional electricity. 1. Phonophone Phonophone iPhone Speakers The Phonophone is a classy looking speaker for the iPhone which resembles an old gramophone. It is more whimsically described as a “Sculptural Audio Console” by its users. Made from ceramic glass, it has a brilliant white finish to it. It is quite a work of art and would stand out as quite the center of attraction. The immaculate shape and structure of the speaker serves its purpose and amplifies the sound coming from the iPhone speakers up to 4x (60 decibels) and offers rich clear sound. However, with the price tag of $450, the Phonophone is an expensive product which makes it less likely to be popular amongst the masses 2. iBamboo iBamboo iphone Speakers The iBamboo speaker is a one foot long length of bamboo which has a slot carved out on it on its top where your iPhone fits in perfectly. This foot long shoot of bamboo is carefully chosen and laser carved and then hand shaped into a desired shape. The bamboo shoot not only looks sleek and pretty but serves a purpose too. When you are playing your music, the sound reverberates through the pipe and gets amplified making it a rich music listening experience unlike no other. The sound coming out from each side creates a stereo effect which is characterized by an airy sound which reminds you holding a shell to your ear. The producers of the iBamboo says that no two products are the same as the different density and texture and shape of the bamboo shoots offer a varied sound quality, which is terrific nonetheless. As far as for all the eco conscious buyers out there, this fits their bill quite well as the iBamboo is easily recyclable. The iBamboo, with a price tag of $25 comes in as a pretty good deal as an inexpensive iPhone speaker. 3. Koostik Koostik iPhone Speakers The Koostik iPhone speaker has a compact look which is made out of a chunk of wood and carved into shape. It comes in many wood choices, namely walnut, cherry or Birdseye maple. Each offers a unique sound. The Koostik speaker utilizes the iPhone’s own speaker and channels out its sound through two hollowed out, hemispherical sound chambers present in the front of the wood carved body. It works just like a hollow body guitar. It acoustically amplifies the sound coming from your iPhone speakers up to four times. The rich acoustic sound makes it perfect for listening to soft mellow music. It is priced at $85. 4. Trumpets-Turned-Speakers Trumpet-turned Speakers iPhone Speakers Christopher Locke is the creator of this one of a kind iPhone speaker system. It’s an ingenious use of salvaged trumpets and machine parts to create a speaker which uses the sound from the iPhone speakers and amplifies it through the trumpet and makes for a wonderful sound texture. The speaker comprises of brass, steel and stainless steel and is a piece of art which makes for a pretty looking showpiece in your home too. The speaker comes for the price of $400.

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Top four iPhone speakers that don’t need additional electricity

5 Easy ways to reduce your energy consumption during summers

September 21, 2011 by  
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Shallu Sharma: Reduce your energy consumption 5 Easy ways to reduce your energy consumption during summers Its high time now and we shouldn’t sit hand in hand depending completely on scientists and researchers to save energy for us. We don’t even realize how much energy we all waste because of your lethargic habits. Saving energy for the generations to come is the biggest challenge is front of us and the ultimate way to tackle this problem is by preserving energy. Given below are few techniques that will help inhabitants save energy as well as a major chunk of their hard earned money. Let us discuss these methods in detail. 5 Easy ways to reduce your energy consumption during summers 1. Shorter showers Shorter showers Reduce your energy consumption In summers, all of us feel an urge to take shower again and again. This cannot be helped because scorching heat makes us feel drained and dirty and taking shower is the only way to regain freshness. But we can still help in reducing water wastage by reducing the showering time. In a survey, it was found that average teenager takes 45 minutes to take bath which is too much. Children should be encouraged to cut down their shower time to save water. 2. Get your water heater checked Water heater checkup Get your water heater checked It has been found that the general temperature requirement in maximum homes is 120 degree Fahrenheit whereas most of the water heaters are fixed at 140 degree Fahrenheit. Fix an appointment with the plumber and get the setting of your water heater checked. Your water heater might also be working on extra temperature. The researchers at U.S. Department of Energy have claimed that reducing water temperature by ten degrees will help is saving three to five percent of energy cost and also the risk of accidental burning. 3. Turn off home computer Turn off computer Reduce your energy consumption Most of us do not turn off our computers and laptops because we keep using them after and again. We prefer putting them to sleep mode but it has been found out that 75 percent of the energy is used when owner thinks that the computer is turned off. Sleep mode does not equal turn off and energy is wasted even if the system is sleeping. So, we should inculcate the habit of turning off our computers. 4. Air-dry towels Air dry towels Reduce your energy consumption Using towel for a while does not necessarily make it dirty therefore; washing towels and clothes that are not dirty is mere waste of water. Efforts should be made to save water and daily habits can save lots of water. Sometimes, we don’t even realize the amount of wastage we do in a day. Unnecessarily wasting clothes waste water, electricity consumed by washing machine for washing, drying and ironing. Think before you wash your towel next time. Sunlight kills bacteria from wet towel when you air dry it, so why not flip towels on railing and save energy yours as well as Earths’. 5. Energy efficient refrigerators Refrigerators Energy efficient refrigerators Conventional refrigerators consume a whole lot of energy and buying efficient refrigerators was very expensive a while ago. But now energy efficient refrigerators are available in the market at very reasonable prices. People should switch to energy efficient refrigerators as they not only consume less energy but also reduce your electricity bills.

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5 Easy ways to reduce your energy consumption during summers

World’s Loudest Animal is a Tiny Insect, Says Study

June 30, 2011 by  
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Photo: DaveHuth / cc While normally a species measuring in at only around 2 millimeters in length might be easily overlooked, one tiny freshwater-dwelling critter has found a way to turn peoples’ heads. Researchers studying ‘water boatman’ ( Micronecta scholtzi ), an aquatic insect native to Europe, say that the minuscule species takes the mantle as the world’s loudest animal relative to its body size

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World’s Loudest Animal is a Tiny Insect, Says Study

Preserving the Sound of Silence in Zion National Park

October 17, 2010 by  
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Zion National Park. Photo: Rene Schwietzke / Creative Commons .

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Preserving the Sound of Silence in Zion National Park

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