The sun is getting dimmer – but it won’t let us off the hook for global warming

February 9, 2018 by  
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Sun worshippers, take note – scientists say that Earth’s life-giving orb of light is dimming, and by 2050 we’ll be living in a colder, darker world than the one we know today. If you think that’s positive news for global warming, brace yourself: while we might get a short reprieve, in the long run, we are still as screwed as ever. The sun has a regular 11-year cycle in which solar radiation rises and falls. But according to a recent study in The Astrophysical journal Letters , for the past few cycles the high has been lower than normal. Consequently, the amount of heat and light we get from the sun has been dropping. In the next few decades, that effect is likely to continue, leaving us with 5 to 8% less radiation. The last time this happened was when the Earth went through what is known as a mini-Ice Age (aka The Grand Minimum to scientists), which happened during the mid-1600s. There’s some debate that this mini-Ice Age was actually due to volcanic activity, but the point is this: even though we may experience some reduction in the heat and light reaching the Earth, the rapidly warming planet is heating up faster than the sun is dimming. Which means that, in all likelihood, we may experience a few years that aren’t as hot as they could be, but they will still be hotter than normal. Related: Scientists Consider Blocking Out the Sun to Stop Climate Change Short term, this means that we might get a bit of a break from the effects of climate change. But the problem is that we humans have a hard time making difficult changes based on future consequences. If we start to see a lessening of global warming’s impact, many may conclude that the threat is over and continue business as usual. But eventually, the sun is going to heat back up, and when it does, we will be in really bad shape. + The Astrophysical journal Letters Via Outer Places Images via Deposit Photos ( 1 , 2 )

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The sun is getting dimmer – but it won’t let us off the hook for global warming

O-House vertical garden doubles as a sun screen in Vietnam

November 1, 2016 by  
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A retired Vietnamese couple commissioned a quiet home with a small garden in which they can spend their free time. The architects responded with a design that prioritizes natural light , introducing a small garden to the back of the house where the couple can grow their own vegetables . This green area includes concrete planters of varying sizes, giving an interesting rhythm to the space. The “green fence” that covers the street-facing facade reduces noise pollution , solar radiation and improves indoor air quality. Related: Striking 13-foot-wide family home in Vietnam looks like a jungle in the city The most attractive area in the house includes the living room, dining room and a large void, the last of which establishes visual connections throughout the interior and facilitates natural ventilation . + LVHQ Via Architizer

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O-House vertical garden doubles as a sun screen in Vietnam

Studio Fuksas completes the largest project built in Rome in over 50 years

October 24, 2016 by  
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The project is built in Rome’s historic quarter EUR and boasts 55,000 square meters (13 acres) of mixed-use spaces, including a hotel. It is defined by three elements: “Theca”, the “Cloud” and the “blade” of the hotel . The “Theca” is the outer layer that comprises a steel structure and double-glass facade and encases the “Cloud” which acts as the heart of the project. The”Cloud” accommodates a large auditorium with 1760 seats, snack points and support services. It looks like an undulating cloud covered by a 15,000-square-meter transparent curtain and acts as an independent structure within the interior of the building. Related: Studio Fuksas Completes Spectacular Terminal With Honeycomb Skylights at Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport The New Congress Center can host various events and has a capacity that can reach a total of nearly 9,000 seats, including the 1,760 seats inside the “Cloud”. The entire complex has a climate control system with variable flow air conditioning and photovoltaics that provide clean energy and mitigate solar radiation. + Studio Fuksas

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Studio Fuksas completes the largest project built in Rome in over 50 years

Study Finds a Three-Decade Decline in the Reflectivity of Arctic Sea Ice

August 14, 2013 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock The reflection of solar radiation by Arctic sea ice is critical to maintaining an overall stable global temperature. This phenomenon, known as “albedo,” has decreased over the past 30 years, according to a study by the Finnish Meteorological Institute . The study finds that there is a clear trend towards disappearing ice in the northern region of the Arctic Ocean, causing a major decline in solar reflectivity. Read the rest of Study Finds a Three-Decade Decline in the Reflectivity of Arctic Sea Ice Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: albedo , arctic ice , Climate Change , European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring , finnish meteoroligical institute , global warming , longer melt periods , loss of polar ice , nature climate change , polar ice cap melt , reflectivity , solar radiation        

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Study Finds a Three-Decade Decline in the Reflectivity of Arctic Sea Ice

New Study from Duke University Links Autism to Induced and Augmented Labor

August 14, 2013 by  
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Duke University  researchers recently published a study that suggests that autism may be linked to labor induction and augmentation. The study revealed that mothers who had induced labor have a 13 percent higher risk of autism, and those who augment already existing contractions have a 16 percent increased chance—this figure more than doubled for mothers who had both procedures done. The Duke study used a sample of records from schools and birth databases from over 625,000 children in North Carolina born between 1990 and 1998 to come to their findings. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: augmented labor , autism , causes of autism , Duke University , induced labor , labor , labor and autism , pregnancy , pregnancy and autism , study        

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New Study from Duke University Links Autism to Induced and Augmented Labor

Top Tips for Raising Your Pet in a Sustainable Way

August 14, 2013 by  
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Image via Shutterstock There is no doubt that pets give us unmatched companionship, but owning one can take its toll on the environment. In a book written by two New Zealand scientists , they suggest that owning a dog is equivalent to the carbon footprint of owning an SUV. We have some top tips for easing the impact while still keeping your furry, feathered, or even scaled best friends around. Read the rest of Top Tips for Raising Your Pet in a Sustainable Way Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: animal shelter , compost , diy pet tips , Eco , how-to , neuter , pet food , pet toys , recycled , spay , Sustainable        

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Top Tips for Raising Your Pet in a Sustainable Way

Purdue Uni Developing Early Warning System For Solar Storms By Measuring Radiation Decay

August 24, 2012 by  
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A team of scientists from Purdue University say they may have discovered a new method to predict solar flares more than a day before they occur . This would not only provide advance warning to help protect satellites and power grids, but also save the lives of astronauts from potentially dangerous radiation. The team made the breakthrough by measuring differences in gamma radiation emitted when atoms in radioactive elements “decay,” or lose energy. Read the rest of Purdue Uni Developing Early Warning System For Solar Storms By Measuring Radiation Decay Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: early warning system , power grid protection , Purdue University , radioactive elements , satellites , solar flares , solar radiation , solar storms

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Purdue Uni Developing Early Warning System For Solar Storms By Measuring Radiation Decay

Kwytza Chopstick Art Transforms Single-Use Chopsticks into Stylish Home Decor

August 24, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Kwytza Chopstick Art Transforms Single-Use Chopsticks into Stylish Home Decor Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2012 NYIGF , Amanda Coen , Amanda Silvana Coen , Bryan Parks , chopstick art , eco design , eco-friendly , Environmentally Friendly , green design , green products , inhabitat , Inhabitat.com , Kwytza Chopstick Art , manhattan , new york city , New York International Gift Fair; gift fair , New York. , nyigf , product design , Recycled Materials , sustainable design , trade show , upcycled materials

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Kwytza Chopstick Art Transforms Single-Use Chopsticks into Stylish Home Decor

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