LEED Platinum fire station is powered with solar energy in Seattle

April 11, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The north end of Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood has recently become home to a new, contemporary fire station that’s also a beacon for sustainability. Certified LEED Platinum, Fire Station 22 was designed by local architectural practice Weinstein A+U to harvest solar power, as well as rainwater , which is used for all of the station’s non-potable water uses. The building also has an enhanced civic presence with a super-scaled and illuminated “22” on its facade and large walls of glass that invite the neighborhood in. Due to its location on a long and narrow corner lot confined by two freeways and a heavily trafficked road, Fire Station 22 forgoes the conventional back-in configuration in favor of a drive-through layout for better visibility and safety. However, this configuration and the constraints of the space meant that the two-story support and crew spaces needed to be put at the front of the site, thus blocking views of the fire station’s apparatus bay, which has always traditionally been visible to the public. To reengage the community, the architects added a public plaza at the main entry, a super-scaled “22” sign on the concrete hose-drying tower and a glazed lobby and station office. “The station needs to mediate this complex site while maintaining rigorous programmatic requirements and balancing users’ desire for privacy,” said the architects , who completed the project as the last full-building replacement project under the 2003 Fire Facilities and Emergency Response Levy. “It does so with a sculptural facade along E. Roanoke Street, which provides privacy for the building’s users while creating pedestrian interest and texture. The station opens up to the future 520 Lid at the northeast corner, with a fully glazed lobby, the iconic Apparatus Bay egress doors, and a hose tower that acts as a landmark on the singular site.” Related: LEED Platinum fire station boosts firefighter wellness in Seattle Built to meet current program standards, Fire Station 22 features highly efficient mechanical and plumbing systems in addition to a solar PV system and rainwater harvesting systems. The project has earned three 2018 AIA Merit Awards. + Weinstein A+U Images by Lara Swimmer

See the original post here:
LEED Platinum fire station is powered with solar energy in Seattle

16th century building in Malta is now a charming eco hotel that reflects a long history

April 3, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 16th century building in Malta is now a charming eco hotel that reflects a long history

Located within the fortified walls of Birgu in eastern Malta, the Locanda La Gelsomina building dates back to the 16th century. Today, the space has been renovated to bring the historic building back to its original glory in the form of a stunning boutique eco hotel boasting several sustainable features, such as solar power and a rainwater collection system. Visitors to beautiful Malta have a sophisticated eco hotel to hang their hats in while they visit the scenic Mediterranean island. Tucked into the hamlet of Birgu on the island’s eastern coast, Locanda La Gelsomina offers guests “an oasis of harmony” located just a short stroll away from the town’s historical sites and the harbor. Related: 8 gorgeous green hotels to add to your bucket list The building dates back about 500 years, but it was recently renovated into a jaw-dropping  boutique hotel . Although the objective was to provide a new and luxurious space for guests, the restoration project focused on retaining the building’s traditional Maltese architectural features as much as possible. Stone walls, high ceilings and arched doorways give the interior spaces a palace-like feel enhanced with antiques and decorative pieces collected from around the world. In addition to its aesthetic and structural renovation, the hotel was also updated with several sustainable features to bring it into the 21st century. A  solar-powered  heating system provides hot water for the property. Additionally, a rainwater collection system, which leads to an ancient well, is used for the hotel’s sanitation systems. The hotel houses four extremely spacious suites, each with its own individual interior design . In addition to the suites, guests can enjoy spending time in the hotel’s many social areas, such as the “jewel-box teahouse,” where Bellocq tea blends are served, or the rooftop terrace, where they can enjoy breathtaking views of the city. + Locanda La Gelsomina Images via Locanda La Gelsomina

Read the rest here:
16th century building in Malta is now a charming eco hotel that reflects a long history

Solar-powered eco hotel in Portugal offers surfers ocean views from green-roofed bungalows

March 29, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered eco hotel in Portugal offers surfers ocean views from green-roofed bungalows

The surf is always up at this gorgeous eco hotel along Portugal’s Silver Coast. Just steps away from the beach, Noah Surf House  has everything you need for a rad surf getaway. The boutique hotel, which is partially made out of reclaimed materials, was designed on some serious sustainable principles , boasting solar panels, energy-efficient systems and appliances, a rainwater harvesting system and even an organic garden that provides delicious meals to guests. Located in the area of Santa Cruz in northwest Portugal, the eco hotel is tucked into a rising hill just a short stroll from the beach. The project is made up of various buildings, but the most popular part of the complex is a restaurant that overlooks the ocean. Guests can enjoy a wonderful meal of organic fruits and veggies grown in the hotel’s garden, which operates on a “closed feeding cycle” with a little help from the hotel’s 12 chickens. Related: The Truck Surf Hotel is a traveling retreat that hits the best surf spots in Europe and Africa The guests rooms are comprised of various boho-style bungalows, most offering stunning ocean views through private decks. The rooms range in size, offering everything from dorm-style with bunk beds to private luxury bungalows that boast fireplaces and private terraces with outdoor showers. Although the setting itself is quite impressive, guests can rest assured that they are also staying in a very eco-conscious retreat. The hotel’s construction used quite a bit of reclaimed materials , such as old bricks recovered from industrial coal furnaces to clad the walls. Additionally, the buildings are filled with discarded items that have been given new life as decoration for the hotel. Plumbing pipes are incorporated into lamps, lockers from an old summer camp are available for storage and an old water deposit is now a fireplace in the reception area. The construction of the hotel implemented various sustainable materials as well, such as cork as thermic insulation. The bungalows are also topped with native plants . For energy, solar panels generate almost enough energy for the all of the hotel’s hot water needs. When there is an abundance of energy, it is used to heat the pool as well as the radiant flooring in the guest rooms in winter. LED lighting throughout the hotel and energy-efficient appliances help reduce the building’s energy use. Noah Surf House also has a rain water collection system that redirects water to a well to be used in toilet flushing, garden watering and linen laundering. + Noah Surf House Via Uncrate Images via Noah Surf House

Read the original:
Solar-powered eco hotel in Portugal offers surfers ocean views from green-roofed bungalows

This gorgeous LEED Platinum winery is made of reclaimed wood

March 20, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on This gorgeous LEED Platinum winery is made of reclaimed wood

San Francisco-based firm Piechota Architecture has designed what is being called the most sustainable winery in Sonoma Valley. Tucked into the rolling hills of Alexander Valley, the solar-powered Silver Oak winery design, which was made with repurposed materials, has already earned a LEED-Platinum certification  and is on track to become the one of the world’s most sustainable wineries. The family-owned Silver Oak Cellars winery was established in 1972 and has since become world-renowned for its award-winning Cabernet Sauvignon. The winery’s first location is located in the Napa Valley town of Oakville. The company’s second winery, designed by Daniel Piechota , is located on an expansive 113-acre estate and 75 acres of prime Cabernet Sauvignon vineyards in Alexander Valley. Related: LEED-seeking winery in Uruguay is built almost entirely of locally sourced materials With its low-lying gabled farmhouse silhouette, the winery appears low-key from afar; however, behind the clean lines, charred timber cladding and minimalist forms lies a powerhouse of sustainability. According to the architects, the design of the winery applies the concept of “reduce, reuse, recycle” through various sustainable features. For energy generation, the winery has an extended roof installed with more than  2,500 solar panels , which generate 100 percent of the building’s energy needs. The design uses plenty of recycled materials, but the reclaimed wood was specifically chosen to pay homage to the area’s wine-making industry. The winery’s exterior is clad in wood panels taken from 1930s wine tanks from Cherokee Winery, one of the valley’s pioneers of wine-making. Additionally, the design incorporated charred panels recovered from Middletown trees that were naturally felled during a fire in the valley in 2015. Now, the blacked trunks and panels have been given new life as a modern, sleek facade for the  winery . Inside, visitors are met with a large entry staircase, also built out of reclaimed wood from oak wine barrels with red wine stains that were intentionally left visible. The rest of the welcoming interior is a light-filled space filled with steel and wood features. Visitors will be able to take part in wine tasting in the winery’s tasting room, which is nearly net-zero water. With a calming reflective pool, native vegetation and open-air seating, this area is the heart of the design. Created to mimic the local barn vernacular, the gabled roof and large cutouts provide beautiful framed views of the rolling hillside that surrounds the estate. Of course, as with every winery, water plays an essential role in Silver Oak’s production. To reduce waste, the winery was installed with a state-of-the-art water reclamation system, including a membrane bioreactor that treats and filters water from the cellar to provide potable water. Rainwater is harvested and collected to be used in the vineyard’s irrigation. + Daniel Piechota Via Dezeen Photography by Joe Fletcher via Daniel Piechota

Read the original post: 
This gorgeous LEED Platinum winery is made of reclaimed wood

Mobile, off-grid micro home can be configured into 20 different layouts

March 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Mobile, off-grid micro home can be configured into 20 different layouts

Architect Beatrice Bonzanigo from Milan-based firm IB Studio has unveiled a stunning, off-grid micro home that is transportable and adaptable to virtually any climate. The tiny structure, called Casa Ojalá, is just shy of 300 square feet but is equipped with a manual mechanical system that allows the space to be configured into as many as 20 different layouts. According to Bonzanigo, the flexible and transportable design of Casa Ojalá was inspired by the need to offer an alternative to the “world of static architecture.” Its versatility opens up a world of opportunity not only in terms of low-impact architecture , but also in offering an off-grid experience that lets occupants completely immerse themselves into the natural world. Related: This off-grid, lunar lander-inspired tiny home is out of this world “Casa Ojalá is a sustainable, minimal, compact and flexible product for a new comfort, away from TV or air conditioning,” explained IB Studio, which is led by Bonzanigo and Isabella Invernizzi. “The boundary between inner and outer space no longer exists. Outdoor is a substantial, fundamental and precious part of it.” The structure is a round volume with a simple layout comprised of two bedrooms, a kitchenette, a living room and a bathroom. A wrap-around, open-air terrace is used to provide a seamless connection between the micro home and its surroundings, no matter where they may be. To create its flexible design , the main structure is equipped with a manual mechanical system made up of ropes, pulleys and cranks that control the sliding wooden walls and fabric partitions. This system allows the structure to be continuously transformed into a fully-customized space, with private rooms or even one large outdoor platform. Built on a track, the house is completely mobile and can be easily assembled on-site. In terms of its sustainability, the structure is made out of eco-friendly materials along with socially-sustainable fabrics and wood features. The design’s footprint is minimal, and the project was also designed to be completely self-sustaining. The design calls for a rainwater collection system and can be installed with photovoltaic panels to generate solar energy. The Casa Ojalá design is slated to be presented during this year’s Milan Design Week. + IB Studio Via Dezeen Images via IB Studio

Go here to see the original:
Mobile, off-grid micro home can be configured into 20 different layouts

A solar-powered houseboat designed for the water-loving adventurer

March 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A solar-powered houseboat designed for the water-loving adventurer

Marked by a stunning contemporary design normally reserved for land-based structures, +31Architects ‘ latest houseboat is simply spectacular. The Amsterdam-based company, which specialize in floating constructions, has truly outdone itself with the Nature Cruiser, a motorized houseboat equipped with hybrid electric drive and solar panels. The Nature Cruiser was commissioned by a German adventurer and entrepreneur who requested a motorized houseboat that would allow him to sail over lakes and rivers. Additionally, the floating home had to be just that, a modern living space that would provide the ultimate in comfort while exploring the world’s most exotic waterways. Related: Energy-neutral luxury houseboat floats in Haarlem waters Accordingly, the designers created a 15-meter-long cruiser with a slender shape punctuated with various large windows. These windows not only provide stunning views of the surroundings, but also allow natural light to brighten the interior spaces. The floor plan is comprised of a large living room, a bedroom, a bathroom and an expansive rooftop terrace. A semi-covered front and back deck provide additional space to sit and take in the views. The beautiful interior design scheme is contemporary and sleek, with warm wood panels used to clad the floors, walls and ceilings. Minimalist, Scandinavian-inspired furnishings create a cozy, inviting space. The innovative houseboat was also designed to be self-sufficient and to minimize waste. Solar panels and solar collectors are installed on the roof to generate energy and provide warm water. The Nature Cruiser also operates with a hybrid electric drive. Its integrated water and sewer systems are aimed at using water from lakes and rivers. The water is purified through the boat’s systems and then stored in a water tank. +31Architects Images via +31Architects

Original post:
A solar-powered houseboat designed for the water-loving adventurer

Scientists invent a solar panel that produces hydrogen

March 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scientists invent a solar panel that produces hydrogen

Scientists in Belgium have invented a solar panel that produces hydrogen as a source of fuel to heat homes. Using moisture in the atmosphere, the solar panel converts sunlight into hydrogen gas, producing about 250 liters of gas every day. The team of scientists, lead by Professor Johan Martens, have been developing their hydrogen solar panel for the past 10 years. When they first started, they were only able to produce small quantities of hydrogen gas, but now the gas bubbles are visible the moment they roll the panel out under the sun. Related: California approves rule to require solar panels on new houses “It’s actually a unique combination of physics and chemistry,” Martens explained. “Over an entire year, the panel produces an average of 250 liters per day, which is a world record.” According to CleanTechnica , Martens estimates that 20 solar panels could provide enough energy and electricity to heat up a home and still have some to spare for the following year. The team is still not ready to build the panels for commercial use, but they are getting ready for a trial run at a home in Flanders. If the tests are successful, the researchers are planning to expand their trials to an entire neighborhood. Being an extremely combustible gas, hydrogen can be dangerous if not handled correctly. While the general public may have some concerns about using hydrogen as a heating source, the Belgium-based scientists said it carries the same risks associated with natural gas. The hydrogen produced by the solar panels is stored in an oil tank that is installed near the home. While this technology is certainly promising — and produces zero carbon emissions — the cost of the solar panels, storage tanks and furnace, plus installation, is a big unknown. That said, the upfront cost may be high, but homeowners would pay off the system over time, especially if they no longer relied on city electricity or natural gas. There is no word yet on when the hydrogen solar panels will be available on the market, but the scientists are very optimistic about the upper limits of this technology. + KU Leuven Via CleanTechnica Image via H. Hach

Continued here: 
Scientists invent a solar panel that produces hydrogen

A ceramic facade blends this dome home into the Spanish coastline

March 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A ceramic facade blends this dome home into the Spanish coastline

Cloud 9 architect Enric Ruiz-Geli has recently unveiled a beautiful home design in the gorgeous Spanish region of Costa Brava. Located on a rustic lot of land overlooking the sea, the dome home is an experimental prototype that combines traditional building techniques with advanced digital and sustainable manufacturing . The Stgilat Aiguablava villa is a domed structure inspired by traditional Mediterranean architecture, normally marked by ceramic cladding, flowing shapes and ample natural light. For the experimental villa, Ruiz-Geli wanted to combine all of these aspects while reinterpreting the local traditional vault system, known as the Volta Catalana. Related: These beautiful desert biodomes will be 100% self-sustaining Using advanced fiberglass engineering , the structure was built with flowing vaulted volumes, adding movement and light to the design. The curvaceous arches, however, did present a challenge for the artisan ceramist Toni Cumella, who was charged with creating a ceramic cover that would allow the home to blend in with the surroundings. Similar to the exterior, the interior of the home is also marked by high arched ceilings. The living space is immersed in  natural light thanks to glazed walls that look out over the landscape to the sea. By using a modern version of the Volta Catalana, the home is energy-efficient. Natural light and air flow throughout the residence in the warm summer months, and a strong thermal envelope insulates the interior in the winter months. Also inside, a specially-designed ceramic piece was installed to to achieve strong, insulative acoustics. An experimental pavilion is separated from the main house by a swimming pool, which uses naturally filtered rainwater. Similar in style to the home, the innovative pavilion was designed in collaboration with the prestigious Art Center College of Design Pasadena. The team built this structure with an inflatable formwork injected with ecological concrete . This building method gives the structure its organic shape, that, according to the architects, was inspired by the existing pine trees that surround the complex. + Enric Ruiz-Geli Images via Cloud 9 Architects

See the rest here: 
A ceramic facade blends this dome home into the Spanish coastline

Solar-powered Menai Science Park offers sweeping views of Wales

March 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered Menai Science Park offers sweeping views of Wales

U.K. architectural practice FaulknerBrowns Architects has completed the Menai Science Park (M-SParc), the first dedicated science park in Wales with a focus on the sectors of low-carbon energy, ICT (information and communication technologies) and the environment. Located west of the Menai Straits on the island of Anglesey, North Wales, the £15.5 million (nearly $20 million USD) campus includes co-working spaces with offices, laboratories and workshops. Designed to encourage innovation, the solar-powered building is wrapped in large, glazed panels that let in an ample amount of natural light and panoramic views of the surrounding countryside. The Welsh Government and the nearby Bangor University established the Menai Science Park to support emerging and existing businesses in the science and technology sectors. The building is strategically located close to the main arterial route on the island for easy access to local businesses, including the Wylfa Nuclear Power Station. Existing and emerging businesses are invited to rent the individual tenancy spaces in Menai Science Park and join a commercial community built on sharing knowledge and expertise. To encourage collaboration, the architects inserted a multipurpose “open innovation space” that serves as a meeting point, events venue and a touch-down space connected to the main circulation “ring” linking all of the individual tenancies. “[The building] is defined by the concept of a folded ribbon of white material which extends out of the surrounding landscape, twists and bends to form the edges of the space, before arcing back down into the site,” FaulknerBrowns Architects said. “Thermoformed Corian, a material typically used in laboratory benching, offered the right combination of plasticity and durability to create the ribbon in the form of fluid rainscreen panels.” Related: A former Czech distillery is transformed into a vibrant co-working space The campus was also created with a strong focus on sustainability and nature. The building is not only formed around a central landscaped courtyard but is also clad in large glazed panels that frame views of the outdoors, including the spectacular Snowdonia mountain range in the southeast. Photovoltaic panels have been installed on the ground level and combined with traditional cloddiau stone walls, which the architects said “offer a visible commitment to low-carbon energy.” + FaulknerBrowns Architects Images by Richard Chivers via FaulknerBrowns Architects

See the rest here: 
Solar-powered Menai Science Park offers sweeping views of Wales

A solar-powered seaside home embraces contrast and scenic views

February 20, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A solar-powered seaside home embraces contrast and scenic views

Melbourne-based firm  Megowan Architectural has unveiled a beautiful home located in Mount Eliza in Victoria, Australia that uses strategic angles and contrast to make the most of the idyllic seaside setting. The three-story Two Angle House is not only aesthetically stunning — behind its sophisticated concrete and wood facade is a complex system that makes the home incredibly energy-efficient . Located in the seaside town of Mount Eliza on the Mornington Peninsula, the 5,920-square-foot home’s sophisticated design scheme is based on contrasting building materials. According to the architects, “The interior and exterior are a play on the contrast between two angles of internal organization, the contrast between warm and cold materials and a considered contrast between architecture and landscape.” Related: Solar-powered modular retreat design in Melbourne inspired by the local landscape The exterior and interior are made with a number of contrasting materials, namely concrete and wood. Using extensive concrete in the floors and walls was strategic to creating a tight thermal mass while in-slab hydronic heating further helps regulate the interior temperatures year-round. Using a system of cubed volumes, which contain two angles within the layout, the Two Angle House was strategically designed to provide stunning views of the ocean. Additionally, the design saw the home’s large concrete blade wall “stretched” from east to west to take advantage of optimal passive solar gain throughout. This allows the structure to not only benefit from a natural heating and lighting system, but it also reduces energy usage substantially. The roof was also equipped with solar panels to provide much of the building’s energy . Much like the outdoor space and wraparound deck, the interior is focused on the amazing sea views, which can be found from virtually any angle inside the home. In fact, just opening the front door leads the eye to the sea at the other side of the house. Large floor-to-ceiling windows and sliding glass doors naturally brighten the interior and open up the living space to the outdoors, creating a seamless connection to the natural surroundings. + Megowan Architectural Via Dwell Images via Megowan Architectural

See the original post here: 
A solar-powered seaside home embraces contrast and scenic views

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 937 access attempts in the last 7 days.