Guallart Architects unveil winning bid for a self-sufficient community in China

August 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Guallart Architects unveil winning bid for a self-sufficient community in China

Barcelona-based Guallart Architects has won an international competition for its design of a mixed-use, self-sufficient community in China’s Xiong’an New Area. Presented as a model for sustainable urban growth, the project champions local energy production, food production, energy efficiency and material reuse. The tech-forward proposal also takes the needs of a post-COVID-19 era and growing work-from-home trend in account by designing for comfortable telework spaces in all residences. Established in April 2017, China’s Xiong’an New Area was created as a development hub for the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei economic triangle. Guallart Architects’ winning proposal for a mixed-use community is part of a scheme to raise the cachet of Xiong’an New Area and provide a post- COVID model that could be implemented in different cities around the world. Related: UNSense to develop a 100-home “real-life testing environment” for the future of housing “We cannot continue designing cities and buildings as if nothing had happened,” Guallart Architects said. “Our proposal stem from the need to provide solutions to the various crises that are taking place in our planet at the same time, in order to create a new urban life based in the circular bioeconomy that will empower cities and communities.” At the heart of the proposal is self-sufficiency ; residents would produce resources locally while staying connected globally. The mixed-use development would consist of four city blocks with buildings constructed with mass timber and passive design solutions. In addition to a mix of residential typologies, the community would include office spaces, recreational areas, retail, a supermarket, a kindergarten, an administrative center, a fire station and other communal facilities. All buildings would be topped with greenhouses to produce food for daily consumption as well as rooftop solar panels. On the ground floor, the architects have included small co-working factories equipped with 3D-printers and rapid prototyping machines for providing everyday items. All apartments would come with telework spaces, 5G networks and large south-facing terraces. + Guallart Architects Images via Guallart Architects

Read the original here: 
Guallart Architects unveil winning bid for a self-sufficient community in China

Painting wind turbines may reduce bird collisions and deaths

August 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Painting wind turbines may reduce bird collisions and deaths

A new study published in the journal Ecology and Evolution shows that painting one blade on a wind turbine black may reduce bird deaths at wind farms by up to 70%. For a long time, organizations, such as the Royal Society For The Protection of Birds (RSPB), have been championing for more care when it comes to setting up wind power plants to avoid the deaths of birds through collisions. This study could reveal a simple solution. Although wind farms provide one of the cleanest sources of energy , they are tainted by the effects of the turbines on birds. It is common for birds to collide with the turbines and die on the spot. The study now shows that if the blades of turbines are painted black, the rate of accidents could greatly decrease. The study was conducted off the coast of Norway; the location is home to the Smøla plant, where six to nine white-tailed eagles are killed annually. Related: US and Canada in drastic crisis with 3 billion birds lost since 1970 According to Roel May, researcher at the Norwegian Institute of Nature Research and one of the authors of the study, wind power negatively impacts wild bird populations. “Collision of birds, especially raptors, is one of the main environmental concerns related to wind energy development,” May said. The main purpose of the study was to find out if there are any mitigating measures that could reduce the collisions. The researchers found that if one of the main rotor blades is painted black, it reduces the motion smear, making the blades visible to birds when they are in motion. While the findings are promising, the study authors warn that more research still has to be done. The new study provides a platform for more studies to explore the possibility of reducing bird deaths at renewable energy plants. “Although we found a significant drop in bird collision rates, its efficacy may well be site- and species-specific,” May explained. “At the moment there exists interest to carry out tests in the Netherlands and in South Africa.” Further studies will need to be carried out in diverse locations to determine the viability of such a move in different areas and on specific bird species. Members of RSPB are also championing for establishing wind power farms in safer locations, where there are no large populations of birds. + Ecology and Evolution Via BBC Image via Matthias Böckel

Continued here: 
Painting wind turbines may reduce bird collisions and deaths

Pittsburgh leads in green energy with largest single sloped solar array in the US

August 18, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Pittsburgh leads in green energy with largest single sloped solar array in the US

The shift from non-renewable sources of energy to green energy continues to gain momentum. In the past few years, we have seen the launch of groundbreaking renewable energy projects around the world. One of the latest projects is a solar array for Mill 19 at Hazelwood Green in Pittsburgh. The project, led by Scalo Solar Solutions , is now the single largest sloped solar array in the U.S. It consists of 4,785 silicon solar panels that are capable of powering the entire Mill 19 plant. The project was established at a cost of $5 million and is expected to provide sufficient power to supply the energy needs of Mill 19. The 4,785 silicon solar panels sit on a 133,000-square-foot area on the frame of Mill 19. The solar panels were installed using an innovative technology called the Spider WorkWeb. With this approach, the panels were directly attached to Mill 19’s existing frame, thereby cutting the cost of putting up a new frame for the project. Each of the LG solar panels was assembled on the ground and then lifted and fitted into position. Related: IceWind launches residential wind turbines in the US The Hazelwood Green site, where Mill 19 is located, is seen as a model for sustainable development. Mill 19 has a goal to achieve 96% daylight autonomy, providing maximum thermal efficiency. Mill 19 is also targeting LEED Gold certification. The design of the solar slope caters to stormwater drainage. A strategic drainage system has been set in place, which will see all the water through a rainwater garden to a centrally located filtration basin. The Pittsburgh solar project is more proof that there is a possibility of attaining 100% renewable energy in many industries. There are many other businesses and organizations that can use the same model to reduce dependence on non-renewable sources of energy. + Pittsburgh Green Story Image via Pittsburgh Green Story and Andreas

More here:
Pittsburgh leads in green energy with largest single sloped solar array in the US

Conceptual eco-village empowers women in Beirut

July 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Conceptual eco-village empowers women in Beirut

In a bid to advance gender equity in Lebanon, Beirut-based Anastasia Elrouss Architects has proposed the Vertical Eco-Village: Urban Lung of Beirut, a three-pronged proposal that centers on the M Tower, a 14-story, greenery-covered tower in the eclectic suburb of Chyah. Designed with a structural concrete shell fitted with recycled wooden partitions, the tower would comprise residences as well as spaces for workshops, retail and agricultural functions on the lower levels. The tower, in conjunction with an off-site wooden pavilion and urban farm, would function as a vocational training and cultural center specifically aimed at empowering Lebanese women through agricultural and self-sustainable skill building. Proposed for a 900-square-meter site at the intersection of two suburban streets, the M Tower emphasizes flexibility and adaptability with open-floor apartment plans that can be uniquely configured by residents into single-floor apartments, duplexes or penthouses with varying amounts of urban gardening space. Pocket gardens and linear terraces wrap around the tower to provide panoramic views of the city and reduce the urban heat island effect. Related: Prefab apartment proposal wants to make city living more sustainable “The building takes on the appearance of a single structural vertical planted element extending the busy city life,” the architects explained. “The intervention is a vertical green landmark revealing a unified structure whose multilayered facades are acting as a protective translucent shell vis-a-vis the street and the surrounding buildings.” For self-sufficiency, the tower would be equipped with photovoltaic panels , solar thermal panels, a rainwater harvesting and storage system and natural underground water storage for irrigation and domestic use. The training and retail facilities, operated by the Warchee NGO, would occupy the lower levels and could include urban farming areas, carpentry workshops, mushroom farming, a vegetable cannery and a vegetable market. The tower’s agricultural production areas would be complemented by the project’s two other satellite locations — Beirut Park’s renovated wooden pavilion and an urban farm — that would be connected to each other via electric shuttle.  + Anastasia Elrouss Architects Images via Anastasia Elrouss Architects

More: 
Conceptual eco-village empowers women in Beirut

A historic farm is thoughtfully repurposed into an organic winery

July 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A historic farm is thoughtfully repurposed into an organic winery

On a mixed farm dating back to the 13th century in East Sussex, Rye-based RX Architects has repurposed a series of old farm buildings into the new home of Tillingham Winery, a natural and biodynamic wine producer committed to regenerative farming and ecological diversity. Set on approximately 70 acres of farmland, the organic winery has not only carved out spaces for wine production and tasting, but for visitor accommodations as well as teaching and artisan workshop spaces. Elements of the original architecture — the property’s various farm buildings include a traditional oast dating back to the 19th century — have been preserved and celebrated in the renovation. Located off of a winding lane in Peasmarsh, Tillingham Winery enjoys stunning panoramic views across the Tillingham Valley toward the Cinque Port town of Rye. To celebrate the views and the rich heritage of the site, the architects restored and re-clad the existing farm buildings with a mix of metal, concrete and timber with simple, robust detailing. The original galvanized metal and timber door was also restored; the massive sliding doors and large expanses of glazing frame views through the building to the courtyard and the landscape beyond. The mixed vine varieties are planted on the predominately south-facing land, while sheep grazing, agroforestry and camping are located across the other parts of the estate. Related: Silver Oak becomes world’s most sustainable winery In another nod to the site history, the architects sunk two large wine-making qvevri — large earthenware vessels used for fermenting, storing and aging wine — underground beside the open-sided oast in an area once used to lay the long strands of hops for drying. In doing so, the architects have not only created the first-ever qvevri cellar in the United Kingdom but have also highlighted the oast’s former agricultural purpose. The oast has also been repurposed into an 11-room boutique hotel for Tillingham. Guests have access to an onsite restaurant, a wine bar and bottle shop and an outdoor kitchen (formerly a dutch barn) for al fresco dining. + RX Architects Photography by Richard Chivers via RX Architects

See more here: 
A historic farm is thoughtfully repurposed into an organic winery

Futuristic DFAB HOUSE is digitally built with robots and 3D printers

July 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Futuristic DFAB HOUSE is digitally built with robots and 3D printers

The homes of the future could be built with robots — that is the narrative that DFAB HOUSE, an experimental “house” in Switzerland’s municipality of Dübendorf, hopes to promote. Set atop Empa and Eawag’s modular research and innovation building NEST, the three-story structure completed last year serves as a testing ground and showroom for cutting-edge smart home technology and robotic construction . Built largely with digital means, the inhabitable “home” is also smart in terms of energy consumption; it includes rooftop solar panels that supply, on average, one-and-a-half times as much electricity as the structure needs as well as heat exchangers that harvest hot wastewater from showers. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/DFAB-HOUSE-9-889×592.jpg" alt="large glass and concrete building topped with a white extension" class="wp-image-2274915" Researchers from eight professorships at ETH Zurich collaborated with industrial partners to not only digitally plan DFAB HOUSE but also make it habitable for academic guests and visiting scholars of Empa and Eawag. The innovative construction has created an otherworldly interior landscape — defined by curvaceous walls and a wavy concrete ceiling cast in 3D-printed formwork — that Empa likens to the Swiss artist H.R. Giger’s Alien film sets. Related: Robots weave an insect-inspired carbon-fiber forest in London The ground floor, which houses the common areas, is built mainly of concrete, while the two upper residential floors are characterized by wooden frames fabricated by construction robots. In addition to a home automation system that coordinates all energy consumption, guest residents also benefit from an intelligent multistage burglar protection system, automated glare and shading options and networked intelligent household appliances that even include a smart hot water kettle. 

See the original post: 
Futuristic DFAB HOUSE is digitally built with robots and 3D printers

Each purchase of this bag made from recycled plastic helps plant trees

July 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Each purchase of this bag made from recycled plastic helps plant trees

Just in time to celebrate National Forest Week from July 13 to July 19, fashion brand Solo New York is planting one tree per purchase for its line of affordable bags made from recycled plastic bottles . The first run of the company’s Re:cycled Collection recycled over 90,000 bottles, and this is just the beginning. The environmentally friendly manufacturing process starts with discarded plastic bottles otherwise destined for the landfill and transforms them into a high-quality and lightweight recycled PET polyester yarn. The process uses 50% less energy and 20% less water and creates 60% less air pollution than traditional fiber manufacturing, according to Solo New York. The main bodies of the Re:cycled Collection bags are made up of the re-spun plastic yarn; the tags, strings and stuffing are made entirely from other biodegradable and recycled materials . Related: Patagonia’s Black Hole Bags are made from recycled plastic bottles The Re:store Tote ($54.99) is made with a heather gray material and includes a padded compartment for laptops, an interior organizer section, a key clip, a front zippered pocket, a quick access pocket and a back panel for sliding over luggage handles. The lightweight, 0.57-pound Re:vive Mini Backpack ($24.99) also includes adjustable shoulder straps and black camo interior lining, while the Re:move Duffel ($64.99) includes shoulder straps that are both removable and adjustable. This is not the first sustainability effort for the popular New York brand — the line also features eco-friendly packaging with fully biodegradable hang tags and recycled boxes. The company also limits use of single-use plastics, and its headquarters is 100% powered by 1,400 rooftop solar panels (which is enough to power 87 homes). Catalogs are printed on paper with 30% post-consumer fiber and are manufactured using renewable energy as well. Now, every bag purchased from the collection will help plant a tree with the National Forest Foundation. + Solo New York Images via Solo New York

Read more here: 
Each purchase of this bag made from recycled plastic helps plant trees

Go off the grid with a Tesla-powered adventure vehicle by Ready.Set.Van.

July 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Go off the grid with a Tesla-powered adventure vehicle by Ready.Set.Van.

After finishing an ambitious, 8-month-long renovation project of a 38-foot school bus for Burning Man, the designers at Ready.Set.Van. realized they had something special on their hands. Fast forward to 2020, and the company has launched a wide range of comfortable and functional off-grid vans that are customizable to any type of adventure. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/ready-set-van-2-889×592.jpg" alt="van with side door open parked in a forest" class="wp-image-2274822" Ready.Set.Van. recently revealed its line of converted van models built using Ram Promaster commercial cargo vans. By harnessing the power of Tesla batteries to increase the comfort of off-grid living, the New Jersey-based company has certainly raised the bar for van life . Related: Custom camper van lets nomads immerse themselves in infinite adventures <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/ready-set-van-3-889×592.jpg" alt="van parked beside a river with view of van interior with white kitchen with wood counters" class="wp-image-2274821" Thanks to Tesla battery modules, each van layout comes with a highly efficient electricity system that allows you to live off of the grid without the need for an electrical outlet or generator. The company’s 840 AH battery system is designed to take up 57% less space and weigh 140 pounds less than an equally sized 12V lithium battery. That means 12-15 hours worth of battery life along with alternator charging and solar panels . <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/ready-set-van-4-889×661.jpg" alt="On the left, white storage drawers in a van. On the right, bike stored in a van." class="wp-image-2274820" The standard “Basecamper” layout starts at $33,750, not including the van itself, with deluxe bathroom “Plus” models starting at $42,250. The base model has enough storage space for at least two downhill mountain bikes in its gear-storage garage below the bed. Ready.Set.Van. has fit up to two bikes, two inflatable stand up paddle boards, two single-wheel skateboards and more inside the garage in the past. The $45,750 “Wanderer” model features a transforming layout complete with a Murphy bed that converts a portion of the van into a dining area with room for up to six people. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/ready-set-van-5-889×667.jpg" alt="van with wood flooring and white lofted bed" class="wp-image-2274818" Kitchens include commercial-induction cooktops, 80L fridges and stainless sinks, while the rest of the interiors contain a wealth of convenient storage and seating. Clients can also choose additional features such as air conditioning, heating, awnings, roof racks and indoor showers. Buyers can also choose to create a completely custom conversion build. + Ready.Set.Van. Images via Ready.Set.Van .

Go here to read the rest: 
Go off the grid with a Tesla-powered adventure vehicle by Ready.Set.Van.

Two young architects travel the Arctic in a repurposed lifeboat

July 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Two young architects travel the Arctic in a repurposed lifeboat

A tale of determination, exploration and sustainability, architects Guylee Simmonds and David Schnabel are taking the trip of a lifetime on a repurposed, retired Arctic lifeboat. Along with their seafaring dog, Shackleton the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, these two architects have given a second life to a decommissioned lifeboat that served in the Western Isles of Scotland. While the boat was originally designed to carry 100 people in survival situations, Simmonds and Schnabel set out to repurpose and rebuild it into a self-sustaining expedition vessel. The goal was to complete the project in a little over one year, just in time to take a 3,000 mile adventure from the U.K. to the Norwegian Arctic. Related: A solar-powered houseboat designed for the water-loving adventurer The architects renamed the boat Stødig, a Norwegian word meaning “sound and steadfast.” As the name suggests, the lifeboat’s reliable and functional design was a large inspiration for its newly adapted role as a self-sustaining and minimalist expedition vessel. The lifeboat , which was on its way to being scrapped if it had found no buyer, was bought in February 2018, and the voyage began in May 2019. The team departed from the southern British port of Newhaven before traveling along the Belgian and Dutch coast, sailing through the Kiel canal in Germany and then venturing into the Baltic Sea. The scenic route took them up the Danish and Swedish coasts past Copenhagen and Gothenburg, past Norway and up to Bergen. All along the way, Simmonds, Schnabel and Shackleton took in some of the best views the world has to offer, from showstopping sunsets and the dreamy Northern Lights to hushed evergreen forests and magnificent, snow-covered mountain landscapes. Stødig was first gutted to provide the architects with a blank canvas, on which they could bring their ideas to life. The boat redesign incorporates two forward cabins, a dining area, kitchen, a bathroom with a composting toilet, bunk beds for guests and a stern cockpit. There are solar panels on the roof, a wood-burning stove and small wind turbines incorporated for additional sustainability. It is made of fiberglass, measuring 11 meters long and 3.5 meters wide. An important feature for exploration, a number of large, curved windows were installed to provide breathtaking panoramic views and bring in as much light as possible. + Stødig Arctic Lifeboat Images via Guylee Simmonds and David Schnabel

See original here: 
Two young architects travel the Arctic in a repurposed lifeboat

Solar-powered luxury home celebrates contemporary style at Lake Huron

July 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered luxury home celebrates contemporary style at Lake Huron

On the banks of Lake Huron in a remote Canadian town, South African architecture firm SAOTA completed a contemporary summer house that’s strikingly different from the region’s “cabin country” vernacular. Carefully sited to keep the design unobtrusive, the luxury residence maximizes connections to the outdoors with full-height glazing and a layout that optimizes lakeside views. Durable weather-resistant materials, energy-efficient systems and a 15-kW solar array help minimize the home’s environmental footprint to meet the project’s sustainability targets. Located about an hour’s drive from London, Ontario, the Lake Huron vacation home departs from the traditional, “somewhat conservative” homes that dot the lakeside with a contemporary design emphasizing clean lines, horizontal massing and a minimalist exterior palette featuring a ceramic-paneled system strong enough to withstand the extremes of the Canadian climate. Despite the home’s eye-catching appearance, the architects allowed the surrounding landscape to largely dictate the design; the building is set back on the property toward the street to preserve a natural bluff located between the lake and forest, while existing mature fir trees were retained to help screen the house from view. Related: SAOTA’s Benguela Cove design takes rooms with a view seriously “The way in which the building is largely obscured from the street and in turn screens views of the lake helps build suspense on arrival, only to satisfy the sense of anticipation via the large pivot door,” the architects explained. “An indoor/outdoor volume to the south anchors the building and maximizes the site’s lakeside views while allowing the living spaces to occupy the foregrounds.” Full-height glazing fills the home with natural light while extended roof eaves protect the interiors from solar glare. For optimum building performance, a commercial-grade automation system was installed to control and monitor the home’s functions while the 15-kW solar array that powers the home feeds surplus energy to the grid for credit and later use. In addition to an Ecoflo septic system, an underground stormwater system capable of handling a 100-year storm was installed onsite as well.  + SAOTA Images via SAOTA

View original post here:
Solar-powered luxury home celebrates contemporary style at Lake Huron

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 5903 access attempts in the last 7 days.