Solar SILO home uses light to feel much larger than its actual size

October 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Solar SILO home uses light to feel much larger than its actual size

Daylight, fresh air, and greenery fill this self-sufficient solar home that feels much larger than its actual size. Students from the Missouri University of Science and Technology designed this net-zero dwelling, named SILO, short for ‘Smart Innovative Living Oasis.’ Inspired by farmhouse architecture, SILO blends a rustic aesthetic with cutting-edge technology to create a homey and completely automated dwelling that ensures stress-free comfort year-round. Home automation is at the heart of SILO. From the HVAC system to lighting, these engineered systems work in tandem to create a comfortable and energy-efficient living space. An energy monitoring system sends feedback to the central control system to improve efficiency and includes the ability to sell excess energy generated by the 8.5-kW rooftop solar array back to the grid. The homeowner can also control all of the home’s systems manually via smartphone or voice commands. Related: The Nest home is a solar-powered prefab made from recycled shipping containers SILO features a flexible open-floor plan that emphasizes views of the outdoors and access to natural light. The light-filled home feels much larger than its actual size thanks to a high-ceiling living area and glazing that wraps both ends of the home. A graywater system feeds into a beautiful water wall, while treated water is reused for irrigation of non-edible landscaping such as the movable green wall. A clay plaster made partly with recycled materials was used as wall paint and boasts air-purifying and humidity-regulating benefits. SILO was designed and built for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2017 and will return to Missouri to be part of the university’s eco-village after the competition. + Solar Decathlon Images by Mike Chino

Original post: 
Solar SILO home uses light to feel much larger than its actual size

This house made of drought-felled wood is a water-saving wonder

October 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This house made of drought-felled wood is a water-saving wonder

California’s extreme droughts are so dire that students at UC Davis have designed an impressive solar-powered home built out of drought-felled timber and installed with various state-of-the-art water conservation features geared towards California residents. The design of the team’s Our H2Ouse (pronounced “our house”) not only implements various grey water systems to use 50% less potable water than a typical residence, but smart technology with real-time LED displays enables homeowners to monitor and control water flow at every single water line. According to the students from UC Davis, who are currently exhibiting their solar home in this year’s Solar Decathlon event in Denver, they based the design on three main pillars: drought resilience, education, and inclusiveness. Using California-specific strategies in the prototype, the resulting Our H2Ouse is a highly-efficient, net-zero-energy design that is equipped to drastically reduce potable water use. Related: 8 amazing homes that are 100% powered by the sun Geared for the state’s inevitable future droughts, the home was installed with various greywater systems , including a cutting-edge sanitization technology developed at the university. All of the home’s water faucets are equipped with light-up feedback displays to help occupants monitor and control water flow rates at every step. For example, the shower has LED lights that change from blue to red, depending on water use. At the front of the house is a wooden water tank with a gauge that rises and falls to display the daily water usage of the home. According to the team, this smart monitoring system was geared towards overcoming the most unpredictable factor in energy and water conservation : human behavior. By installing smart technologies with real-time displays, the team hopes to bridge the gap between potential and realized water and energy savings. Interestingly, a unique feature of the home’s digitized system allows for sharing usage numbers within a network of users, meaning that eco-minded homeowners can actively participate in not only their own water conservation efforts, but that of the surrounding community. While the heart of the home may be geared to address the state’s water issues, the aesthetic is also a nod to California style. The simple, modern-rustic design reflects the two side of Cali life, urban and rural. To efficiently and sufficiently insulate the home, the team chose to use a 12” thick, bamboo-based , panelized exterior wall system and structural insulated panels (SIPs). This system reduces the home’s carbon footprint to a fraction of a standard residence. All of the wood used in the home was sourced from salvaged California trees  that died due to the state’s severe drought. Because this felled wood is dry and prone to burning, using it in the home design actively helps prevent forest fires. On the interior, the home is well-lit with natural light thanks to large glass doors that lead to the open-air deck. As for the interior furnishings, there are plenty of multi-functional items that were handcrafted by the students themselves, including hollow stools that can be used for storage, and that can be combined to be used as beds or tables. Motion-triggered recessed circadian LED lighting was installed into the flooring to create a modern, but efficient ambience throughout the home. + UC Davis Solar Decathlon Photography by Mike Chino

Excerpt from:
This house made of drought-felled wood is a water-saving wonder

Transformable solar building changes shape to teach people how to live sustainably

October 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Transformable solar building changes shape to teach people how to live sustainably

How do you persuade people to adopt sustainable lifestyles? A team of Swiss architecture students believes in the power of demonstration—and they’ve designed and built the eco-friendly NeighborHub to prove their point. Conceived as a collaborative community space, the NeighborHub is a transformable, shared space that demonstrates innovative solutions, from renewable energy and water management to biodiversity and sustainable mobility. The NeighborHub is a community space that provides innovation solutions to the challenges of climate change and resource depletion. The building explores seven themes—renewable energy, water management, waste management, mobility, food, material choices, and biodiversity—within a transformable shell built of laminated veneer lumber. “The house is divided into two main spaces,” said the Swiss Team. “The center of the NeighborHub, the core, is a thermally controlled space. It is surrounded by the extended skin which is controlled by passive strategies.” The modular, prefabricated building envelope can adapt to different needs, from a private bedroom to a bicycle repair shop, and even expand its footprint to the outdoors thanks to movable walls and transforming furniture. The NeighborHub’s movable facade is clad in active solar panels and solar thermal panels on the east, south, and west sides. An edible garden grows atop the rainwater-harvesting roof. Two vertical greenhouses are installed to show off space-saving year-round farming techniques such as aquaponics . A zero-water “dry” toilet recycles waste and produces compost that can be used as fertilizer. The rainwater collected from the roof is treated with an on-site phytopurication system and reused for non-potable uses, such as laundry and irrigation. Related: Hurricane-resistant SURE HOUSE wins the 2015 Solar Decathlon The NeighborHub was designed and constructed by the Swiss Team, comprising students from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), the School of Engineering and Architecture of Fribourg (HEIA-FR), the Geneva School of Art and Design (HEAD) and the University of Fribourg (UNIFR). The Swiss Team’s solar prototype was developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon , an academic competition that challenges student teams to design and build full-size solar-powered homes; this year’s contest is held near Denver, Colorado. Following the competition, the NeighborHub will be brought back to the blueFactory in Fribourg, Switzerland for further research and development. + Solar Decathlon Images © Mike Chino

Here is the original:
Transformable solar building changes shape to teach people how to live sustainably

Budapests tallest tower to follow the highest standards of sustainability

October 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Budapests tallest tower to follow the highest standards of sustainability

Foster + Partners designed a tower for Budapest that will not only be the city’s tallest—it’ll also be a beacon for sustainability. Designed as the new headquarters for the oil and gas company MOL Group , the mixed-use building named MOL Campus is wrapped in glazing to maximize natural daylight, views, and connection with the outdoors and urban fabric. MOL Campus will be powered by low and zero-carbon energy sources, such as photovoltaics, and saves on energy costs with cutting-edge technology that controls light levels and temperatures. Located in southern Budapest , MOL Campus is set to be the tallest building in the city and will comprise a 28-story tower with an integrated podium. In addition to offices, the campus will include a restaurant, gym, conference center, public sky garden, and other facilities. Glass clads the unified, curved volume to provide daylight and views. Greenery, including mature trees, travels through the heart of the building from the central atrium on the ground floor to the public garden at the top of the tower. The architects see the green spaces as a “social catalyst” that encourages collaboration, relaxation, and inspiration in the workplace. Related: New Budapest museum will feature a sweeping green roof resembling a skateboard ramp “As we see the nature of the workplace changing to a more collaborative vision, we have combined two buildings – a tower and a podium – into a singular form, bound by nature,” said Nigel Dancey, Head of Studio, Foster + Partners. “As the tower and the podium start to become one element, there is a sense of connectivity throughout the office spaces, with garden spaces linking each of the floors together.” The building’s location in a dense urban environment allows employees to walk or cycle to work. In addition to use of photovoltaics and energy-saving technologies, MOL Campus will also feature rainwater harvesting and storage facilities. + Foster + Partners Images via Foster + Partners

Go here to see the original:
Budapests tallest tower to follow the highest standards of sustainability

Hurricane-resistant SURE HOUSE wins the 2015 Solar Decathlon

October 17, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Hurricane-resistant SURE HOUSE wins the 2015 Solar Decathlon

Read the rest of Hurricane-resistant SURE HOUSE wins the 2015 Solar Decathlon

Read the original post: 
Hurricane-resistant SURE HOUSE wins the 2015 Solar Decathlon

Every solar panel on this CO2-neutral Austin home has its own inverter

October 8, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Every solar panel on this CO2-neutral Austin home has its own inverter

Read the rest of Every solar panel on this CO2-neutral Austin home has its own inverter

Read more from the original source:
Every solar panel on this CO2-neutral Austin home has its own inverter

Dennis Parren builds amazing light tower with a moving LED platform

October 8, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Dennis Parren builds amazing light tower with a moving LED platform

Read the rest of Dennis Parren builds amazing light tower with a moving LED platform

Originally posted here:
Dennis Parren builds amazing light tower with a moving LED platform

This tiny “e-mailable” solar house snaps together like a 3D puzzle without a single nail

October 8, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This tiny “e-mailable” solar house snaps together like a 3D puzzle without a single nail

Read the rest of This tiny “e-mailable” solar house snaps together like a 3D puzzle without a single nail

More:
This tiny “e-mailable” solar house snaps together like a 3D puzzle without a single nail

World’s tiniest snail fits inside the eye of a needle

October 8, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on World’s tiniest snail fits inside the eye of a needle

Tiny living has taken on a whole new meaning with the discovery of a new mollusk in China . The world’s tiniest land snail, also known as Angustopila dominikae , was found in Guangxi Province, China. The little guy takes residence in a spiral shell smaller than one millimeter. That’s so tiny that it fits snugly inside the eye of a needle. Read the rest of World’s tiniest snail fits inside the eye of a needle

Read the rest here: 
World’s tiniest snail fits inside the eye of a needle

Net-zero Aggie Sol offers affordable sustainable housing to low-income groups

October 8, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Net-zero Aggie Sol offers affordable sustainable housing to low-income groups

Read the rest of Net-zero Aggie Sol offers affordable sustainable housing to low-income groups

Read more:
Net-zero Aggie Sol offers affordable sustainable housing to low-income groups

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1094 access attempts in the last 7 days.