New stacked solar cell absorbs energy from almost the entire solar spectrum

July 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on New stacked solar cell absorbs energy from almost the entire solar spectrum

Most traditional solar cells aren’t able to convert long-wavelength photons into electricity . A team of researchers led by Matthew Lumb at The George Washington University is hoping to change that in order to capture more power. They’ve designed a solar cell that can harvest just about all of the energy in the solar spectrum – and could become the world’s most efficient solar cell with an efficiency of 44.5 percent. The scientists created a prototype of their solar cell that differs from most others: they stacked multiple solar cells to create a single device that can capture nearly all the solar spectrum’s energy. And as opposed to the solar panels that adorn many rooftops , this new solar cell utilizes concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) panels that concentrate sunlight onto micro-scale cells using lenses. Related: SunPower nabs record for world’s most efficient rooftop solar panel The cell works something like a sieve for sunlight, as each layer absorbs a certain set of wavelengths, to capture nearly half of available energy – most traditional cells only capture around one quarter. Efficiency is one of the main goals of any researcher working on solar cells, and these scientists obtained what could be the highest efficiency in the world using materials based on gallium antimonide (GaSb) substrates. A technique called transfer-printing allows the tiny cells to be constructed with great precision. But this groundbreaking solar cell wasn’t cheap. Still, though the materials utilized were expensive, the scientists think the technique to build the cells is promising to show how efficient a solar cell could be. In the future they think a similar product could hit markets “enabled by cost reductions from very high solar concentration levels and technology to recycle the expensive growth susbtrates.” The journal Advanced Energy Materials published the research this week. 12 scientists from the United States Naval Research Laboratory and other American institutions collaborated with Lumb on the paper. Via Newswise Images via Matthew Lumb and Pixabay

Read more from the original source:
New stacked solar cell absorbs energy from almost the entire solar spectrum

Sandia solar glitter can fit into and power devices of any size or shape

February 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Sandia solar glitter can fit into and power devices of any size or shape

Small, lightweight, flexible: these attributes when applied to solar cells hint at a far-off clean-powered future to come. But Sandia National Laboratories is now one step closer to seeing the tiny bendy solar cells they’ve developed, which they call solar glitter, on the market. These energy-generating cells could easily be integrated in small gadgets like drones , satellites , or smartphones. Former Sandia scientist Murat Okandan started his own company, mPower Technology, Inc. , and recently signed a licensing agreement with Sandia for microsystems enabled photovoltaics (MEPV), the technology that makes solar glitter possible. Okandan described the moment as a key milestone, saying, “It is an extremely exciting time in the solar industry with the upcoming critical, rapid change in the worldwide energy infrastructure .” Related: Amazing Glitter-Sized Photovoltaic Cells Look Like Golden Snowflakes MEPV draws on microdesign and microfabrication techniques to create the tiny solar cells that are then are released into a solution much like printing ink. The mix is then printed onto an inexpensive material. mPower will commercialize MEPV as Dragon SCALEs, which Sandia says will “fit into and power devices or sensors of any shape or size.” Dragon SCALEs fold like paper for easy transportation, and could be utilized as portable energy generators. They could be installed more rapidly and cheaply than typical solar power systems. Okandan said Dragon SCALEs are more reliable, with lower energy costs, than the silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells common today. In a statement he said, “The key limitation to silicon is that if you bend and flex it, it will crack and shatter. Our technology makes it virtually unbreakable while keeping all the benefits of high efficiency, high reliability silicon PV. It allows us to integrate PV in ways that weren’t possible before, such as in flexible materials, and deploy it faster in lighter-weight, larger-area modules.” Via Treehugger Images via Randy Montoya/Sandia National Laboratories and Sandia National Laboratories

Continued here: 
Sandia solar glitter can fit into and power devices of any size or shape

Sunflare’s new ultra-thin solar "wallpaper" can stick to any surface

October 24, 2016 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Sunflare’s new ultra-thin solar "wallpaper" can stick to any surface

Imagine being able to tape thin, affordable solar cells anywhere: the top of a trailer, the side of a building, or the roof of your car. Sunflare ‘s new solar technology could make that possible. The Los Angeles-based startup has developed solar cells just a few micrometers thick that “can be secured to any surface with a special double-sided tape,” according to company founder Len Gao. The Los Angeles-based Sunflare team spent 16 years developing their ideal solar cell made with copper, indium, gallium, and selenide. The solar cells are said to be superior to traditional solar technologies in terms of weight and efficiency, generating 10 percent more power and weighing 65 percent more lightweight than other panels. Sunflare’s CIGS solar cells are affordable too, potentially costing as little as $1.07 per watt. Related: 1-micrometer-thin flexible solar cells can wrap around a pencil The flexibility of Sunflare’s thin solar cells, which lack a glass substrate, mean they could be placed in areas inaccessible to traditional panels. Sunflare lays out their vision on their website : “Sunflare panels can be seamlessly incorporated into existing structures or integrated into unique architectural designs, all while providing clean, renewable, affordable energy .” The manufacturing process has often tripped up solar manufacturers in the past; processes can be expensive due to materials or chemicals consumed. Sunflare says they’ve fixed many of those issues with their proprietary Capture4 solar technology , a way to make the solar cells with less toxic chemicals (they don’t use cadmium or lead) and less water. They’re also able to recycle the water they do use. Can Sunflare deliver? The company says they successfully produced solar cells last year, and were expected to commence manufacturing on a larger scale this summer. You can’t yet buy the solar cells on their website, but you can send a message to the company for more information. Sunflare envisions their solar cells utilized in just about any industry, from the military to construction and automotive. + Sunflare Via Treehugger and FastCo.Exist Images via Sunflare

See the original post here:
Sunflare’s new ultra-thin solar "wallpaper" can stick to any surface

New 3D solar cells capture sunlight from every angle

July 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New 3D solar cells capture sunlight from every angle

Georgia Tech scientists developed three-dimensional solar cells which just hitched a ride to space this week on a SpaceX rocket. At the International Space Station , the solar cells will be tested to see how well they function and how they respond to space conditions. The solar cells have been designed to capture the sun’s rays from every angle, which could enable spacecraft to gain more power from a limited surface area. The experimental module blasted into space includes four different types of solar cells. One type is a “traditional planar” solar cell, and a second is a planar cell based on a formulation of low-cost materials: copper-zinc-tin-sulfide (CZTS). These materials cost about ” a thousand times less than the rare-earth elements ” like selenium and indium used in some solar cells. There are also two types of 3-D solar cells: one “based on CZTS” and the other “based on conventional cadmium telluride.” There are 18 solar cells total, and they will be tested in space for six months. Related: 2,500 orbiting solar “flying carpets” could power the planet 3-D solar cells could forever alter the way spacecrafts receive power. The Georgia Tech solar cells are described as miniature “towers” coated with a “photo-absorber.” Instead of requiring the sun to be right above them to work, the innovative 3-D solar cells can capture sunlight over longer periods of time. Georgia Tech Research Institute principal research engineer Jud Ready said in a press release , “We want to see both the light-trapping performance of our 3-D solar cells and how they are going to respond to the harshness of space.” After six months, the solar cells will return to Earth so scientists can study how they held up in space. According to Ready, “If it can survive in space, which is the harshest of environments from the standpoint of wide temperature swings, radiation, and numerous other factors, then we can be confident it will work well down on Earth.” Via Phys.org Images via Gary Meek, Georgia Tech

Go here to see the original: 
New 3D solar cells capture sunlight from every angle

Giant gold spot draped over this building will catch the eye of anyone flying into Seoul

July 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Giant gold spot draped over this building will catch the eye of anyone flying into Seoul

Created in partnership with Gansam Architects , Paradise City will comprise two buildings: the 3,600-square-meter Sandbox retail complex and the 6,200-square-meter Nightclub. The project will serve as the centerpiece of a new tourist hub for the Korean capital. Rather than insert two conventionally styled buildings, the architects designed two concrete monolithic forms that are distorted and manipulated to respond to the surrounding environment and take on a more fluid, rippled form. Related: South Korea Unveils Plans for Sustainable Mini-City in World’s Best Airport “The project takes two simple volumes, which create a new urban space. These masses then take an imprint of the facades around the site, stretching over the two buildings. Thus adapting themselves to the given environment, accepting these conditions as a sine qua non,” says MVRDV co-founder Winy Maas . “The buildings are opened by lifting them like a curtain, unravelling their interior. Then, to top it off is the golden spot, marking the entrance like a sunbeam, making its presence known even from the air and the landing planes at Incheon airport.” The project is expected to be completed in time for the 2018 winter Olympic games and will have a direct mono-rail connection to Incheon airport. + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

See original here: 
Giant gold spot draped over this building will catch the eye of anyone flying into Seoul

Flame-colored NOAA map paints a picture of this week’s toasty heat wave

July 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Flame-colored NOAA map paints a picture of this week’s toasty heat wave

Nobody needs a news report to know that summer is hot, but we’re in the midst of a particular scorcher. Scientists like to create visualizations to convey the full impact of natural phenomenon, such as heat waves, and this one from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reveals—in bright, flaming hues—what may be in store for the continental United States this week. The heat map was created using predicted high temperatures across the country , painting one toasty picture for the days ahead. Data from NOAA’s HRRR Model was compiled to create a map that shows the predicted high temperatures on July 18, 2016 at 5 p.m. EDT. The map is essentially a snapshot of the dawn of the  heat wave that is expected to last through the week. The heat wave is expected to be severe, as a “heat dome” created by a high pressure ridge and extreme temperatures will trap and intensify heat in several places across the U.S. Related: Lethal extreme heat and wildfires scorch the American Southwest The forecast calls for heat index values to reach 110 degrees or higher in some areas of the country. The National Weather Service issued heat alerts for more than a dozen cities in light of the soaring temps . A quick glance at this brightly colored heat map is slightly terrifying, but a slightly longer gaze will allow enough time for the realization that this is only the beginning, and there is a great deal of summer left to endure before temperatures will ease back to more comfortable levels. Via Gizmodo Images via NOAA and Shutterstock

See the rest here:
Flame-colored NOAA map paints a picture of this week’s toasty heat wave

Groundbreaking new solar cell solves vexing high temperature issue

February 29, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Groundbreaking new solar cell solves vexing high temperature issue

In our quest to replace fossil fuels with solar power, we have to first fix the solar cell , which typically stops working at temperatures above 100°C. Luckily, researchers at TU Wien may have just discovered a way to solve this issue with a solar cell that can work at 400°C. Read the rest of Groundbreaking new solar cell solves vexing high temperature issue

The rest is here: 
Groundbreaking new solar cell solves vexing high temperature issue

Scientists smash solar cell efficiency record by converting 40.4% of sunlight to energy

December 8, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scientists smash solar cell efficiency record by converting 40.4% of sunlight to energy

A team from the University of New South Wales , Australia, just set a new world record for solar energy efficiency by successfully converting 40.4% of available sunlight into electricity. And what’s even more remarkable is the fact that the record was achieved by using commercially available solar cells in a new way – which means, as the team explains, “these efficiency improvements are readily accessible to the solar industry.” Read the rest of Scientists smash solar cell efficiency record by converting 40.4% of sunlight to energy Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: commercial solar , concentrated solar power , efficiency , efficiency record , photovoltaics , Solar Cell , solar panel , solar plant , Solar Power , solar power tower , University of New South Wales , unsw

Read more: 
Scientists smash solar cell efficiency record by converting 40.4% of sunlight to energy

Multijunction Solar Cells Break Efficiency Records by Harvesting the Full Spectrum of Light

June 2, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Multijunction Solar Cells Break Efficiency Records by Harvesting the Full Spectrum of Light

Engineers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new type of solar cell that uses multiple junctions instead of single subcells to gather the full spectrum of light. The panels are able to capture different wavelengths of sunlight, so they can achieve power conversion efficiencies of 44% as compared to the 29% of standard panels. Read the rest of Multijunction Solar Cells Break Efficiency Records by Harvesting the Full Spectrum of Light Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: full spectrum solar cell , multijunction solar cell , prof john rogers , renewable energy , semprius , Solar Cell , solar junction , Solar Power , University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Read more here:
Multijunction Solar Cells Break Efficiency Records by Harvesting the Full Spectrum of Light

Super Efficient Transparent Solar Cells Could Turn Windows into Clean Energy Generators

October 22, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Super Efficient Transparent Solar Cells Could Turn Windows into Clean Energy Generators

Imagine windows powering homes, office buildings, and even airplanes . That fantasy might not be far from reality thanks to the latest breakthroughs in solar cell technology. Researchers from the Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) have developed an organic solar cell with an increased level of transparency and solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency that could turn entire buildings into powerful energy generators. Their research was recently published in the journal Nature Photonics   . Read the rest of Super Efficient Transparent Solar Cells Could Turn Windows into Clean Energy Generators Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “clean energy” , “solar energy” , clean tech , green tech , Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) , Nature Photonics , renewable energy , Solar Power , solar power breakthroughs , solar technology , transparent solar cells , windows that generate energy        

View post: 
Super Efficient Transparent Solar Cells Could Turn Windows into Clean Energy Generators

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1430 access attempts in the last 7 days.