Bamboo Compression Socks offer support via natural and recycled materials

December 22, 2020 by  
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Life is busy. Sometimes, it is so busy that it becomes difficult to take proper care of ourselves. One tool for handling long days on your feet or sitting at a computer is a trusty pair of compression socks. Now, Ostrichpillow offers the newly released Bamboo Compression Socks that are made to pamper and support your feet. Ostrichpillow has already made a name for itself as a self-care brand with carefully curated, high-quality products focused on improving sleep and offering pain relief. The latest addition to the product lineup, these compression socks aim to prevent problems like blood clots in the legs by improving circulation, even when you’re not moving. Related: These bamboo socks by Flyte are anti-bacterial and hypoallergenic Pablo Carrascal, CEO of Ostrichpillow said, “We noticed how today’s sedentary lifestyle lacks movement, especially for the legs. The recommendation is to walk about 10,000 steps a day, however, in the US that average is lower than 5,000. We spend so much time still: commuting, in front of the computer, the TV, the tablet… This negatively affects blood circulation, increasing foot and leg swelling, fatigue, and the pooling of blood. In the long term that can be a problem. We thought then of a product which could help to supply that lack of movement effortlessly.” The socks incorporate recycled and natural materials into an eco-fiber blend made up of 50% bamboo, 25% recycled polyester, 10% recycled nylon and 15% spandex. The product earned Oeko-Tex Standard 100 certification, which means it is free from harmful levels of more than 100 substances known to be damaging to human health . The Ostrichpillow Bamboo Compression Socks are available in two sizes: S-M (shoe size 5-9) and L/XL (shoe size 9-14). They retail for $29.99 with two color options. Well, actually there are two color combination options, because each pair is intentionally mismatched. You can select from pairs of yellow and blue or red and olive green. Bamboo Compression Socks review The company provided a sample pair of compression socks for me to try at home. I didn’t really know what to expect, but I assumed they would be like other compression socks I’ve worn in the past. They’re not — in all the best ways. These socks feel amazing, like a giant hug of support up and down the leg. I’m fairly tactile-sensitive, so I was happy to find that the fabric felt good against my skin. While I wouldn’t describe it as soft, it certainly was less plastic-like than other compression socks I’ve put on. This is also true when crossing my ankles or otherwise rubbing the socks together. There was nothing abrasive in the contact. As for fit, the socks are much longer than I anticipated. For me (5’6” on a good day), they land a few inches above the knee. I thought that would be annoying, but the additional support throughout the knee region is welcome in alleviating the discomfort from joint issues. I appreciate that the fabric doesn’t bunch up behind the knee or crease when I bend the knee. The pressure is snug but not restrictive. This allows for easy movement without any sort of pinching. Although I didn’t hit the trails in them, I didn’t experience any slipping and never had to pull them up after putting them on for the day. I wore the socks on a fairly cold day, with outdoor temps around 36°F. They feel thick, although they are actually quite thin. I would say these bamboo compression socks are thicker than dress socks but not nearly as thick as winter wool socks. They are equivalent to or even a bit thinner than typical athletic socks. This makes them easy to wear with a variety of shoe options. Due to this thickness and coverage, I thought they would be hot. However, there is a noticeable breathable quality in the fabric, especially where the stripes are located. The construction of the socks felt durable, with a cushioned sole and reinforced heel. The toe seam is often an issue for me if it rubs, pinches or sits off-kilter. This toe bed seems very roomy, perhaps in contrast to the snug fit of the rest of the sock. This allows for plenty of wiggle room for the toes. It will be fun to see if the company offers more color options for the stripes in the future. During my conversations with the company, Carrascal had remarked, “somehow they might remind [of] the kinesiological tapes.” That resonated with me, because they really do! Personally, I think the mismatched colors add character without being overly whimsical. However, the two-tone look might not appeal to some. Because I spend much of my day sitting in front of a computer, I expect to get a lot of use out of these bamboo compression socks. They would also be great for air travel and use in jobs that require long hours on your feet. I can’t personally imagine wearing these during exercise , although I can see how they could offer support and a layer of warmth during a morning fall run. Even if you do break them in with a good sweat, bamboo is naturally antimicrobial, which should keep away foot odor. If you decide to gift the Bamboo Compression Socks to the desk jockey, road warrior or respected elder, know the company responsibly packages shipments with recyclable paper . + Ostrichpillow Images via Ostrichpillow and Dawn Hammon / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by Ostrichpillow. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own .

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Bamboo Compression Socks offer support via natural and recycled materials

Award-winning Jewish primary school gets a sustainable expansion in Chicago

December 22, 2020 by  
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The Blue Ribbon School-recognized Bernard Zell Anshe Emet Day School (BZAEDS) in Chicago, Illinois has elevated its unique identity with a sustainable expansion that celebrates the private K-8 day school’s Jewish values and cultural heritage. Designed by local architectural practice Wheeler Kearns Architects , the recently renovated BZAEDS has most notably gained a secure, light-filled entry with a plaza, a variety of gathering spaces, flexible classroom areas and a series of environmentally friendly features, which range from a solar array to permeable paving throughout for responsible stormwater management. Opened in 1946 with the motto “You Shall Teach Them Diligently,” the Bernard Zell Anshe Emet Day School is located next to the Anshe Emet Synagogue, with which it formerly shared a small and nondescript entrance accessed from the parking lot. The new, 32,000-square-foot Bernard Zell Anshe Emet Day School Expansion, completed last year, provides the school with a secure and independent entrance dedicated to the students. The entry vestibule is fronted with south-facing glass to promote connection between the school and the community. Full-height glazing also provides views to the school’s varied functions from religious classes held in the “Makom Rina” (Place of Joy) to the outdoor recreational fields. Related: This modern art museum was once a cheese factory in Arkansas “The addition embeds timeless Jewish principles and ideas into the structure and experience of the building, while providing an efficient, sustainable innovative learning environment for future generations,” the architects explained. “The building uses daylight , open space, visual connection, and material cues so visitors can intuit their way through the building. Most importantly, the building makes all visitors, staff, faculty and students feel like they have a place to call home.” In addition to providing a more attractive entry and flexible gathering spaces, such as the lushly landscaped entry plaza, the expansion optimizes the environmentally friendly aspects of the solar -powered school. Ample glazing lets in natural light and reduces dependence on artificial lighting while deep overhangs mitigate solar heat gain. A VRF mechanical system was installed for on-demand heating and cooling. Recycled, renewable and low-VOC materials were selected for much of the interior palette, such as the ceilings, linoleum floors, tile and athletic field composition. + Wheeler Kearns Architects Photography by ?Steve Hall, Hall + Merrick Photographers via Wheeler Kearns Architects

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Award-winning Jewish primary school gets a sustainable expansion in Chicago

The Sustainability Consortium’s CEO reflects on its 10-year, trillion-dollar impact

August 5, 2019 by  
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Watch your socks! The CEO is sprinting ahead into the TSC’s next decade.

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The Sustainability Consortium’s CEO reflects on its 10-year, trillion-dollar impact

Ecological footprint accounting and its critics

August 5, 2019 by  
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While sustainability can’t and shouldn’t be defined by a single number, it is still necessary that human demand be within the regenerative capacity of the planet.

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Ecological footprint accounting and its critics

Catching up with circular design pioneer Bill McDonough

August 5, 2019 by  
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The foundational thinker and author chats about why we need more practical examples of what’s working in the world of circularity.

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Catching up with circular design pioneer Bill McDonough

How can I reuse or upcycle trainer socks/glove socks/foot socks?

September 2, 2011 by  
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About seven or eight years ago now, I had a bit of a thing for trainer socks/glove socks/foot socks — those socks that stop before your ankle so they almost disappear in trainers/sneakers — and bought quite a few pairs to wear for work. Now seven or eight years later, arrgh, I hate them. They always slip down so my trainers rub the back of my ankle, and they’re useless in walking boot style shoes where you need the protection further up as well. It’s not even a “hide-the-unsightly-cuff” issue any more because my jeans are always way too long so you can barely see my shoes, let alone a gap between the hem & the shoe, and on the very, very rare occasion I wear a skirt or shorts, I’ll be more than likely wearing them with nice no-sock shoes or flip-flop/sandals anyway. After slowly growing to despise them over the last couple of years, I decided to evict them from my sock drawer last night. I counted 24 pairs. Yes, I clearly had a big thing for them seven or eight years ago. Anyway, now I have 24 pairs of ankle-cuff-less foot socks which need reusing or upcycling. They’ve all been well used so aren’t really in a position to be passed along – but equally, have a bit more life in them than to just become cleaning rags — so I’m looking for upcycling ideas really. Some ideas I’ve had so far: attached two pairs together to make above-ankle socks; Alice’s moth-repellent idea ; stuff with cat nip to make a cat toy; use them to make sock monsters (although they’re mostly plain so might be dull). Any other ideas?

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How can I reuse or upcycle trainer socks/glove socks/foot socks?

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