Sustainable toiletries packaged in soap aim to eliminate single-use plastics

July 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Sustainable toiletries packaged in soap aim to eliminate single-use plastics

Single-use plastic may be the biggest issue of our time, but admittedly, it’s sometimes an uphill battle to find alternatives. But now, when it comes to finding sustainable toiletries, there’s a eco-friendly option. Already well-known for innovative and sustainable designs, Mi Zhou has just unveiled Soapack, a collection of sustainable shampoo packaging made out of soap. Personal care products often come in mass-produced plastic containers that have a fairly short lifespan, requiring multiple purchases throughout the year. From face lotions to hair gels and everything in between, we are constantly suffocating the planet with a shocking abundance of plastic waste , especially considering that the standard plastic bottle can take up to 450 years to break down . Related: The Refill Shoppe enforces zero-waste packaging, provides bulk refills for household and beauty products Thankfully, there is a new green option for shampoo users that not only helps reduce waste but adds a touch of sustainable luxury to your toiletries. Soapack is a collection of shampoo bottles that are cast from soap that melts away after they are completely used. Each Soapack bottle is made out of a vegetable oil-based soap that is dyed with mineral pigments, plants and flowers. Similar to the process of making ceramic containers, the mixture is poured into molds of various shapes. The bottles are then lined with a thin layer of beeswax to make them waterproof and prevent the liquid contents from completely dissolving when in contact with water. The best place to store the bottles is on a soap dish, so that they can slowly melt away without making a mess, eventually disappearing after use instead of leaving behind another discarded bottle in the trash . The design was inspired by antique perfume bottles — opaque shells with light pastel hues and delicate, shapely curves. Although they are designed to melt away, if kept dry, the sustainable soap bottles can even be used as a decorative feature. With the innovative packaging design , Zhou hopes to revolutionize the packaging industry for the good of the planet. “Product packaging has always been thrown away, no matter how well-designed or what material it is made of,” Zhou explained. “I want to re-evaluate what packaging could be as well as help us to reduce our plastic footprint.” + Mi Zhou Design Images via Mi Zhou

Original post:
Sustainable toiletries packaged in soap aim to eliminate single-use plastics

Millenials are bringing camping back

July 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Millenials are bringing camping back

Let’s get one thing straight: camping was always cool. It wasn’t, however, always a very popular pastime among young people. According to the 2019 North American Camping Report, sponsored by Kampgrounds of America, there are more millennials and Gen Xers likely to identify themselves as lifelong campers now than in any other year. The study, which began in 2014, was conducted through surveys in both the United States and Canada.  The percentage of North Americans who camp three or more times per year has increased by 72 percent since 2014, adding 7 million more camping households (families with children under 18 years-old who camp) to the Canadian and American campgrounds. Younger campers are also helping to increase the popularity of hiking and backpacking while they camp, according to the report. Related: Seven commandments of Leave-No-Trace Camping While the majority of campers choose the traditional approach of camping (sleeping in tents), there are more millennials choosing to camp in cabins and RVs instead, with 14 percent using cabins in 2016 and 21 percent in 2018 to be exact. The study also found that campers are more diverse than ever. Of the 1.4 million households that went camping for the first time in 2018, 56 percent were millennials and 51 percent identified as nonwhite. For the first time since 2014 (when the study began), the percentage of non-white first-time campers outpaced the percentage of new campers who identified as Caucasian. When it comes to trendy “glamping,” all age groups are showing interest. Particularly in millennials, 50 percent of which said they were interested in glamping in 2018 versus the 25 percent who said they wanted to try it in 2017. Glamping refers to unique camping accommodations that often includes enhanced services like luxury yurts, king-sized beds, spas and even private chefs. Some glamping companies have been praised for providing an eco-friendly alternative to traditional hotel or resort accommodations. Many take advantage of locally-sourced food, composting toilets and solar power to give their guests opportunities to connect with nature while still having access to the creature comforts they’re used to. The same goes for “van life,” a camping lifestyle that uses altered camper vans, or motorized class B vehicles, as opposed to RV’s or tents. The main objective is often to go off the grid and easily move from place to place without having to disassemble a tent or find an electrical power source for your RV. The number of millennials who wanted to experience van life shifted up by about 4 percent between 2017 and 2018. Those who live the van life trade modern comforts and space for a chance to get as close to nature as possible while living a minimalist lifestyle.   So why the spike in camping interest? 30 percent of millennials say that major life events such as having kids is impacting their desire to camp more, while another 30 percent said that the ability to see other people traveling and exploring popular destinations (thank you, social media) made them want to spend more time camping. Even more encouraging, half of all campers said that the “love of the outdoors” first sparked their interest in camping, meaning that more camp-loving North Americans are beginning to value nature even more than before— a good sign for our national parks , and the planet as a whole. One out of every 20 camping families said that 2018 was the first time they’d ever camped. 2018 also saw the highest number of self-identified lifelong campers ever recorded, with more millennials identifying themselves as lifelong campers than in past years. As studies have shown, spending as little as two hours in nature can improve mental health, and camping offers the opportunity to connect with nature with the added benefits of unplugging from the internet and electronic devices. Additionally, activities such as hiking which often accompany camping provide good exercise , even setting up your tent and site counts! Since the study began in 2014, the amount of North Americans who intend to camp more has almost doubled. The groups who were most optimistic about their camping future were families and millennials, as 61 percent of millennials said that they planned to camp more in 2019. There’s no denying it, the future of camping looks bright. So if you were in one of those families growing up that had an annual camping trip, consider yourself lucky. You’re already ahead of the pack! Via Matador Network , Curbed Images via Xue Guangjian , Kun Fotografi , Rawpixel.com , Cliford Mervil , Snapwire

Read more here: 
Millenials are bringing camping back

Pentagonal Snhetta cabin overlooks breathtaking Oslo views

July 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Pentagonal Snhetta cabin overlooks breathtaking Oslo views

Beautiful vistas aren’t the only treat awaiting hikers in Oslo’s Nordmarka forest — a Snøhetta -designed cabin has recently been added near one of the city’s most stunning viewpoints and can be booked online year-round. Dubbed Fuglemyrhytta, the small self-service cabin takes the shape of a pentagonal timber shelter punctuated by a large panoramic window to frame views of the Oslo fjord at Vettakollen. Easily accessible by foot and public transit, the charming, city-owned cabin can accommodate up to 16 people by day and 10 people overnight. Opened to the public in September 2018, Fuglemyrhytta has since welcomed over 2,000 overnight guests — a number the architects reported to be over six times the average for similar service cabins — and is usually fully booked every day of the week. The popular cabin is located on the west side of a small hill by Fuglemyra near the Vettakollen metro stop, which connects to the city center. A “gapahuk” shelter and timber benches can also be found around the cabin, and a small outhouse with a toilet and woodshed is tucked behind the building. The architects built the cabin with locally sourced and natural materials, from a structure of cross-laminated timber with two stiffened and isolated glulam frames to ore-pine cladding. Inside, cross-laminated timber also lines the interior while select walls are treated with hard wax oil to create surface variations ranging in color from light gray to burgundy to orange. Related: Snøhetta designs healing forest cabins for patients at Norway’s largest hospitals “The cabin is composed of two staggered pentagonal volumes, whose shapes and height add a sense of lightness to the different rooms,” Snøhetta noted in a project statement. “The shape of the rooms further creates clever sleeping solutions and more interesting views out on the surrounding landscape.” A large, south-facing window frames views of the outdoors and brings light into the spacious common room, which includes plenty of seating, an oven and a stove. The cabin also features a long mudroom at the entrance, a drying room and two bedrooms. + Snøhetta Photography by Ivar Kvaal and Ole Petter Steen via Snøhetta

See the original post here:
Pentagonal Snhetta cabin overlooks breathtaking Oslo views

Bad Behavior has blocked 1245 access attempts in the last 7 days.