A striking modernist home in Joshua Tree can be yours for $498K

July 27, 2018 by  
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If you’re a fan of multidisciplinary American artist Fritz Haeg , here’s your chance to own and live inside one of his unique works. Located in Joshua Tree , this eye-catching, Haeg-designed home has hit the market for $498,000. Sandwiched between two large five-acre Bureau of Land Management (BLM) parcels, this Joshua Tree home offers spectacular views in every direction. Located on a 45-acre lot at 2373 Arizona Road , this Fritz Haeg Joshua Tree home is a one-of-a-kind design spanning 721 square feet with one bedroom and one bathroom. Given its desert surroundings, the residence was built with high-efficiency heating and cooling as well and insulated glass to lower the energy footprint. The custom-build house sits on a concrete slab foundation. Concrete has also been used for the flooring throughout the interior and on the outdoor patio. The glazed entrance to the home is recessed behind an arched overhang, and transom windows and sidelights let in additional natural light. Instead of a foyer, the interior immediately opens up to the dining room with a compact kitchen area behind it. A low dividing wall separates the eat-in kitchen from the living area bathed in daylight. Large windows frame panoramic views of the outdoors. Related: These tiny steel cabins in Joshua Tree epitomize off-grid design Located on the opposite side of the home from the dining area, the bedroom is similarly cocooned in an arched room with curved timber walls that extend seamlessly to form a barrel ceiling. This bedroom is also separated from the central living area by a top-mounted patterned sliding door. The custom bathroom is tucked into the rear of the house in a cylindrical volume made of corrugated metal . The house also opens up to a covered back patio, where residents can truly embrace the desert landscape. + 2373 Arizona Road Images via Paul Karr

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A striking modernist home in Joshua Tree can be yours for $498K

Colorful raised gardens bring greenery and shelter to the Thames riverfront

July 27, 2018 by  
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Cities across the world are reclaiming their waterfronts – and that includes London, where a series of verdant gardens are sprouting to reconnect the populace with the Thames River. As part of the Nine Elms Riverside Strategy to revitalize the waterfront in South West London, local architecture practice Studio Weave was tapped to design a landscaped pavilion that draws inspiration from the bygone industrial era. Raised on timber-clad steel columns, the pavilion—called the ‘Nine Elms Thames Walk Pavilion’—combines copper-coated water tank panels with a lush and elevated garden that provides habitat for wildlife and shelter for passersby. Completed this month in collaboration with Churchman Landscape Architects , the Nine Elms Thames Walk Pavilion is part of a larger scheme to beautify the Thames Riverside Walk. The ground-level planters and the raised pavilion are both constructed with the same proprietary metal panels—typically used for water tanks—that have been sprayed with a copper finish in reference to the area’s industrial legacy. Over time, these panels will develop a natural green patina as they weather the elements. “Fabricated from copper coated water tank panels, the pavilion cradles a medley of rich foliage that acts as a honey pot for creatures great and small,” explains Studio Weave in a project statement. “Hawthorn trees, and a rainbow of grasses and perennials will create a home for wildlife as well as a splash of seasonal colour to the thoroughfare. Habitat is also created by the cladding to the water tower forming House Sparrow terraces. The area is known to host the House Sparrow, ‘Passer Domesticus,’ a species undergoing severe population decline.” Related: Magical new classroom reconnects children with nature in the UK To bring an extra splash of color to the structure, print artist Linda Florence was invited to design the colorful pattern on the screen-printed timber columns. The rope-work and abstract motifs also add interest to the installation. The Thames Walk Pavilion also provides furniture and equipment for use at Bourne Valley Wharf. + Studio Weave Images by Ollie Hammick

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Colorful raised gardens bring greenery and shelter to the Thames riverfront

Schemata Architects weaves modern design into a traditional Japanese house

July 5, 2018 by  
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Tokyo-based  Schemata Architects have renovated a traditional Japanese residence into a modern dwelling with an office, while keeping many of the 80-year-old building’s original features intact. Located in the seaside city of Kamakura an hour south of Tokyo , the Hojo Sanci is set in a quiet and lush residential area. To minimize changes to the original building structure and retain an open feel, the architects used varying floor heights and finishes to differentiate the programmatic areas. Built primarily from wood, the two-story Japanese home — which comprises a beautiful onsite garden and verdant greenery beyond — dates back to the early 20th century. Schemata Architects oriented the home’s rooms outward to keep the original emphasis on the outdoors. However, they removed the fusuma (wood-framed paper sliding doors) that had divided the rooms to create one large open space. To celebrate the building’s past, the architects also preserved existing finishes and partially exposed the substructure by removing sections of the ceiling and walls. Tatami mats were also laid down in certain rooms, where the floor was elevated above ground by 60 centimeters. “We decided to focus on floor heights and finishes and treat them as means to express different spatial characters and define spatial/functional zones,” explained Jo Nagasaka, the founder of Schemata Architects. “Firstly, we set a tatami floor area raised 40 cm above the earth floor at the entrance as a reference plane and determined the height, dimension and finish of respective floors in other areas. Each room was distinguished from others by different characteristics of furniture placed there. The floor height differences create a vibrant feeling as well as different viewpoints, allowing one to constantly feel nature and creative energy at any place and anytime in this space.” Related: Century-old Japanese townhouse reborn as Blue Bottle Coffee’s first Kyoto location The mix of modern and traditional becomes apparent in the various room designs. On the west side of the home, the architects inserted a Japanese-style room with tatami and an engawa (a type of covered veranda ) that connects to the garden, and OSB floors and gray geometric furnishings are used in the contemporary office addition. + Schemata Architects Images via Kenta Hasegawa

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The 1970s brick Upside-Down House gets an eco-friendly refresh

July 5, 2018 by  
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Melbourne-based Inbetween Architecture has breathed new life into a dark and tired 1970s double brick home in Kew, Australia. Nicknamed the Upside-Down House, the gut-renovation includes a dramatically transformed interior with a focus on natural daylight and energy efficiency . In addition to increased daylighting with skylights and adherence to passive solar principles, the remodeled home was fitted with energy-saving LED lighting, hydronic heating, improved insulation and solar-powered ventilators. When Inbetween Architecture was tapped for the project, the team debated between renovating and knocking the structure down to start anew. After weighing the environmental and cost benefits, however, the architects decided to retain the existing house, which was structurally sound but extremely dated and depressingly dark. As a result, they focused on bringing natural light into the home. Since the ground floor receives less access to daylight , the team decided to flip the ground floor and the first floor programming by placing the bedrooms on the ground floor and the communal living areas in the light-filled first floor — thus giving rise to the home’s nickname, the “Upside-Down House.” “The favorite part of our renovations is without question the soaring cathedral-like skylights that not only brought light in, but created space above without impacting on the roofline,” said the client, a young family of four. “Visually, our house flowed from room to room with the feature stair-case leading directly to the open tallow-wood living areas lit up by the northern sun. This flow continued to the outdoors with the clever relocation of an outdoor balcony to link to the previously isolated pool-area allowing for an expansive out-door entertaining area second to none.” Related: Smart Home targets affordability and eco-friendly design in Australia The architects replaced the home’s original seven “closet”-sized bedrooms with four spacious bedrooms. The interior design follows a minimalist aesthetic with hidden storage to avoid clutter. Created to meet a six-star energy rating, the home takes advantage of thermal mass from the existing concrete slabs on both floors and the externally insulated double brick walls. Long roof eaves and new dual shading help mitigate solar gain . + Inbetween Architecture Images by Tatjana Plitt and Nick Stephenson

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London architects infuse dated Victorian townhouse with tons of modern personality

January 9, 2018 by  
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This refurbishment project in North London emphasizes the home’s history while infusing it with modern personality. Architecture firm LLI Design enhanced and restored features of the Victorian townhouse to honor its past, and completely redesigned the rear kitchen extension with a new contemporary aesthetic. The original layout of the house had nicely proportioned rooms, a delightful garden and a handsome exterior which the design team enhanced by stripping out some of the dated features and reinstating others to bring out more of the Victorian feel of the property. Related: Jewel-like glass box deftly extends a Victorian house in London’s Mile End The ground floor of the 2500 square-foot house has a generous hall leading to 2 connecting reception rooms. At the end of the hall sits an extended kitchen that juts out into the garden. The team decided to leave the cellar as it was and use it for additional storage and reinstate the stained glass in the fanlight window above the front door and side window. They re-tiled the entrance hall in crisp black and white period tiles with a border pattern, which lightened and visually expanded the space. A dramatic copper and glass pendant light by designer Nigel Tyas now hangs from the top floor ceiling down to the ground floor. The living and dining rooms were refreshed with bespoke pale grey lacquer joinery and asymmetrical shelving lit with individual accent spotlights. The designers installed folding sliding doors in dark grey aluminium in the kitchen extension in order to give it a stronger connection to the garden. Upstairs, re-designed dressing room and master suite feature elegant new finishing and fixtures with delicate lighting solutions. The nursery suite was redesigned, with playfully illustrated roman blinds and colorful watercolor dot wallpaper. + LLI Design

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Green-roofed Viewpoint Granasjen is a modern take on the traditional Norwegian hut

December 1, 2017 by  
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The traditional Norwegian hut got a brilliant update with this modern, sustainable retreat that offers stunning views of the country’s fjords and mountains. Bergersen Arkitekter AS designed Viewpoint Granasjøen as a combination of shelter and summer house that recreates the old Norwegian Gapahuk (English: lean-to) as a multi-functional, flexible space that can be used throughout the year. The structure functions as a  summer house  escape, complete with grill, shed, and bathhouse, and was designed in close collaboration with the client and his specific needs and requirements. It is clad in dark brown stained wood that matches the main cabin on the property. A turf roof provides additional insulation and is angled to blend into the landscape. Related: Coastal cabin in Norway is a perfect indoor retreat for outdoor lovers Large sliding glass panels provide a direct connection to and offer expansive views of the surroundings. The interior is simple, with a custom-built bench for seating and a small built-in fireplace . + Bergersen Arkitekter AS Via Plataforma Arquitectura Photos by Kjetil Nordø

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Green-roofed Viewpoint Granasjen is a modern take on the traditional Norwegian hut

Portuguese winery transformed into a minimalist and modern home

September 8, 2017 by  
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A 20th century winery has traded barrels of grapes for family gatherings thanks to the efforts of Extrastudio . The Lisbon-based architecture firm transformed the former winery into a light-filled home in Azeitao, a small village in southern Portugal. The architects retained the gabled structure’s original building footprint, but refreshed its look with a red-colored render that gives the building its new name—the Red House. Built in the 20th century by the client’s grandparents, the winery has been overhauled into a minimalist and modern dwelling complemented with a black-bottomed pool. Despite its contemporary interior, the home exudes rustic appeal thanks to its gabled roofline and uneven application of red-colored render. The facade’s patchy and pinkish appearance, which changes over time, echoes the look of the original weathered walls. “A natural red pigment was added to the mortar, to reinforce the building’s presence, allowing the house to age gradually and changing its tonality, without ever requiring a coat of paint,” said the Extrastudio, according to Dezeen . “Over the days and months, the colour of the house alters, lighter or darker depending on the humidity, almost black when it rains.” The render derives its color from powdered brick and heat-treated clay, a material that protects the facade against weathering damage. Related: 100% solar-powered winery keeps naturally cool with cork-insulated roofs Natural light fills the Red House, which is dominated by white-painted interiors, pale concrete floors, and tall ceilings. Mirrors line the living room to further reflect light. Full-height black glass doors stretch the width of the garden-facing facade on the ground floor and slide completely open to expand the living space to the outdoors. The ground floor comprises the communal areas, arranged in an open-plan layout, while the bedrooms and bathrooms are placed on the floor above. A small room occupies the attic. + Extrastudio Via Dezeen Images via Extrastudio

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Modern renovation reconnects London home with its beautiful rear garden

February 7, 2017 by  
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An extensive renovation reconnected this semi-detached, multi-occupancy house in Chiswick, London , with its beautiful rear garden and introduced much needed natural light into the interior space. AU Architects renovated the house by balancing traditional detailing and modern design, creating a contemporary family dwelling that breathes. The architects were tasked with creating a large open-plan ground floor reception space with visual connections to the rear garden and upper bedrooms. This visual openness is enhanced by a large sliding sky-frame door that opens onto a charming garden terrace. A green lighting system maintains the feeling of spaciousness at night. Related: Traditional London house gets a whimsical, fox-shaped extension The design team also created a new basement with a full-height glass surface on the side of the stairwell that reduces sound travel. Polished concrete and natural materials create visual variety that add the refinement of modern design to the warmth of a family home. + AU Architects Photos by David Butler

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Modern renovation reconnects London home with its beautiful rear garden

Grow Box home clad in weathering steel harmonizes with a plot full of Japanese maple trees

July 22, 2016 by  
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The 1,975-square-foot house is located in Lexiton, Massachusetts, on a lot populated by over 40 different varieties of Japanese maple trees carefully cultivated by the owners. Considering its surroundings, the house is a combination of a compact volume and spaces that form decks, gardens and courtyards . The integration of interior and exterior spaces is further accentuated by providing each room with a garden and unobstructed views of the surroundings through floor-to-ceiling windows . Related: What looks like giant white crystals is actually a lake house in Western Massachusetts The central courtyard houses a single Himalayan birch tree and collects rainwater and melting snow. Operable windows and sliding doors provide a more direct connection with the outdoors. Weathering steel panels used as exterior cladding material further integrate the home within its lightly disturbed natural surroundings. + MERGE architects Via Design Milk Photos by John Horner

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Grow Box home clad in weathering steel harmonizes with a plot full of Japanese maple trees

Light-filled dentist clinic shows how good design can calm patient fears

May 26, 2016 by  
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Like many medical environments, the LeXin dental clinic is dominated by white surfaces that give the interior a hygienic and pristine feel. However, Canon and Mengshu’s design notably departs from the norm with their unusual take on the reception room that looks more like a cozy living room rather than the typical waiting room. Floor cushions, a variety of seating styles, and ample natural light help create a calming home-like environment. Related: Shift Architecture + Urbanism Transforms a 1930s Dutch Villa Into a Light-Filled Modern Dental Clinic To maximize access to natural light, the designers installed glazed sliding doors and frosted partitions that also make the clinic feel more open, spacious, and accessible. “Our aim was to design a clinic we would be less afraid to go to: a space that feels accessible, rather than hermetic,” said Canon. Timber surfaces used in the furnishings and doorways lend a sense of warmth, while small and playful design details, like the colorful zigzag bathroom floor tiles and wooden toothbrush shelving, add unique character. The light-filled treatment room also connects to a small photography studio where patients can take before-and-after treatment photos. + Germain Canon Via Dezeen Images via Germain Canon

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