New hybrid hammock tent lets you float between the trees

November 24, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New hybrid hammock tent lets you float between the trees

The Snow Peak Sky Nest Tent has a footprint of approximately four feet by seven feet, which is roughly the same as the average two-person camping tent designed to be pitched on the ground. The Sky Nest is outfitted with an inner liner to protect against condensation, and its rooftop is made largely from mesh which offers both ventilation and a dazzling view of the tree canopy above. The floating tent is able to hold its shape, complete with a relatively level lounging/sleeping surface, thanks to a built-in frame around the perimeter of the tent’s footprint. Related: Kengo Kuma’s ultra-minimalist trailer is the perfect shell for your nomadic adventures In addition to its smart design, the Sky Nest Tent also includes clever features to make life outdoors a little easier. A hidden shoe pocket in the floor offers a place to stash your footwear where they can stay dry. The tent also includes mounting gear, including padded sheets to protect tree bark and rope guylines that lash to the ground to stabilize the whole darn thing during windy weather. The tent comes equipped with UV protection that has become ubiquitous in the outdoor gear industry and, like most Snow Peak equipment, is made from high-quality technical materials. The Sky Nest Tent is currently on sale for $1,300 USD. + Snow Peak Sky Nest Tent Via Uncrate Images via Snow Peak

Here is the original:
New hybrid hammock tent lets you float between the trees

Human construction projects could wipe out the world’s last wild tigers

November 24, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Human construction projects could wipe out the world’s last wild tigers

A new report from WWF reveals that tiger habitats in Asia could be devastated by planned infrastructure that would fragment their range and increase confrontations between wild tigers and humans. There are fewer than 4,000 tigers left in the wild, and if these new roads and railways aren’t planned carefully, it could completely wipe out the slow, painful progress conservationists have made to preserve the species in recent years. The report comes during what could be a turning point for the animals – halfway through an effort on the part of 13 nations to double wild tiger population . In 2010, there were only an estimated 3,200 left on the planet. As of this April, there are thought to be 3,890 . If these Southeast Asian nations are going to reach the goal of 6,400 by 2022, the $8 trillion they’ve allocated to infrastructure projects in coming years needs to be sustainable and avoid critical areas where tigers live. Related: Tigers declared extinct in Cambodia Part of the problem is that it’s very hard to track tiger populations , so no one’s completely sure exactly where they live, or how to best avoid their territory. The WWF is advocating a few approaches for mitigating the potential harm to tigers: first, construction should be banned in areas that have been identified as critical tiger habitat; second, the countries involved should take a zero-tolerance approach to poaching ; and third, underpasses and green bridges should be built into any new infrastructure to allow wildlife to cross roads and train tracks safely. This approach would also have benefits for humans living in these areas: for instance, the initiative could help protect local water supplies. While conservation may be the primary question on the mind of the WWF’s researchers, government officials should keep in mind that human beings have to be able to live sustainably on this planet, too. Via IB Times Images via Wikipedia

Go here to read the rest: 
Human construction projects could wipe out the world’s last wild tigers

Bad Behavior has blocked 1210 access attempts in the last 7 days.