Family of five moves from a 2,100-square-foot-house to a beautifully renovated school bus

March 14, 2018 by  
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After deciding to move out of their 2,100 square foot house, Brandon and Ashley Trebitowski spent six months converting a classic Blue Bird bus into a sophisticated mobile home for their family of five. The family relied on the principles of minimalism to create their new home, building almost all of the furnishings themselves. Although the space is a mere 240 square feet, it feels bright and airy thanks to its monotone color scheme and open floor plan. Inspired by the tiny house movement , the couple spent six months creating their new home on wheels . They began by gutting the bus and framing the living space, built out to their needs as a large family. To make the most out of the space, they made the furniture themselves, including the large sofas. The interior is a sophisticated take on minimal design, using white walls to enhance the space. They also kept the original bus windows in place to also create the illusion of space through an abundance of natural light . Related: This amazing renovated school bus is a bright, airy home for a family of six The living area is extremely warm and cozy thanks to a beautiful, wood-burning stove that sits in the corner. According to the family, the stove has kept the interior warm all winter and kept the kids busy chopping wood. The sleeping area is in the back of the bus, where the kids have bunk beds on either side of the aisle and the master bedroom is nestled into the back of the bus. Although they did most of the work themselves working within a budget, they did indulge in a few splurges such as the subway-tiled shower with a clear skylight that opens up the compact bathroom. The kitchen area is also a favorite of the family. The butcher’s block countertop stands out beautifully against the white walls, and the space is quite functional for the family who likes to cook a lot. Although some question the feasibility of moving such a large family into a converted bus , the Trebitowskis – who publish tales of life on the bus on their Instagram Page – say that their new life in the compact bus is everything that they’d hope for, “We do life together, spend more time together and experience more with one another than we did living in a large home. We love the simple life and wouldn’t have it another way!” + Treb Adventure Via Apartment Therapy Images via + Treb Adventure

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Family of five moves from a 2,100-square-foot-house to a beautifully renovated school bus

This amazing renovated school bus is a bright, airy home for a family of six

March 5, 2018 by  
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Converting an old school bus into a living space is never an easy task – but when you’re trying to create enough room for a family of six, the project becomes a whole ‘nother beast. When Gabriel and Debbie Mayes began to embark on their skoolie refurb, they knew it would have to accommodate themselves as well as their four children for years to come. The result is an amazing, light-filled home on wheels that has plenty of living and storage space for the entire family. The Mayes Team began their renovation by buying an 250-square-foot, 2000 Thomas High Top with the seats still intact. Excited as they were about their new adventure, the ambitious couple soon discovered that the old bus was a “rust bucket.” However, they moved forward by gutting the entire interior, and creating a specific layout that would meet their needs. Related: Traveling family renovates old school bus as both solar-powered home and hostel After months of hard work, the family managed to convert the old bus into a comfy 250 square feet of living space by using several space-efficient tactics. Instead of creating a long, shotgun type of home, for example, the wanted to separate the living space from the bedrooms. Putting the living room towards the front of the bus, they created a natural barrier with an L-shaped kitchen, which blocks the view of the sleeping area in the back of the bus. For the sleeping area, the kids have four bunk beds positioned over the wheel wells, with the parents’ bedroom at the very back of the bus. The bed was positioned over the engine, leaving enough room for clothing storage underneath, again making use of every inch of available space. Upon entry, the living space is divided into two sides, with two couches on either side that can fit the entire family. The couches can also fold out into a full bed for guests. The interior design scheme revolves around predominantly black, white, and grey tones, giving the interior a polished look. Using white walls creates an airy, spacious interior, which is enhanced by various large windows that flood the space with natural light . The design also incorporates various wood accents to add a sense of warmth to the design. As is the case with most tiny living spaces, creative storage solutions were essential in this project, especially with a large family. Throughout the bus conversion, hidden drawers and cupboards were installed in every available inch of space. The team installed storage under the couch and even a shoe shelf by the front door. According to the family, these areas are incredibly helpful to help the big family avoid clutter, “This has been such a blessing and has helped us to keep the bus organized.” The family, who is now “parked” in California while the kids go to school, posts updates about the project and their travels on their website and Instagram . + The Mayes Team Via Dwell Images via The Mayes Team

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This amazing renovated school bus is a bright, airy home for a family of six

Pre-industrial carbon found in Canadian Arctic waters

March 5, 2018 by  
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Old or possibly ancient carbon is being released from Arctic soils, according to new evidence cited by The Washington Post . The work is an indicator that permafrost thaw could be aggravating the issue of climate change — although the paper said scientists are debating how much ancient carbon Arctic soils would discharge normally. Study lead author Joshua Dean of Vrije University told The Washington Post, “I would say if you’re looking at anything pushing several hundred years old to a thousand years old, then you have to start wondering whether that should be coming out of this kind of system.” A team of researchers from institutions in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands utilized radiocarbon dating on the content of waters in the Northwest Territories of Canada and found what they described as abundant pre-industrial carbon in research published late February in the journal Environmental Research Letters . They hoped to establish a basic measurement, according to The Washington Post, of the amount of old carbon flowing into Northwest Territories waters. Further research will be necessary to pin down whether the amounts of old carbon are unusual or not. Related: Why Alaska’s vanishing permafrost worries researchers Anna Liljedahl, a University of Alaska at Fairbanks professor who wasn’t part of the study, told The Washington Post when it comes to this area of research, a smoking gun is elusive due to cryoturbation, which means, “a mixing of soil layers due to seasonal freeze and thaw process, brings old carbon up and young carbon down into the soil column.” She did say she thought these scientists were on to something, and more studies would bolster the evidence. Dean said the study can’t prove the Arctic has altered to put out more older carbon, but the results are still worrying. He told The Washington Post, “Clearly it’s a warning sign for the future.” + Environmental Research Letters Via The Washington Post Images via Depositphotos and Good Free Photos

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Pre-industrial carbon found in Canadian Arctic waters

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