This plastic-free, organic personal care kit is ‘All Good’

December 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on This plastic-free, organic personal care kit is ‘All Good’

When they say it’s All Good, this ethical body care company means it’s good for you and the planet. In addition to the company’s notable organic products previously highlighted in a variety of publications, All Good has now taken the extra step to remove all plastic from the products and shipping packaging in its newest two releases. All Good began in 2006 with the mission to do good. Since its inception, the company has become a member of 1% for the Planet, the J.E.D.I Collaborative and many other industry partnerships for environmental and social justice. Plus, All Good has earned the coveted B-Corp Certification. Related: How your beauty routine might be killing sharks All Good’s newest products Recently, All Good unveiled the Plastic Free Body Care Set, a set of organic body care products packaged with zero waste . It features All Good Goop Skin Relief Balm, reef-friendly SPF 50 Tinted Mineral Sunscreen Butter, nourishing Coconut Hand & Body Lotion and a hydrating Coconut Lip Balm. Each item is housed in glass, paper or metal containers and presented in an unbleached canvas travel pouch, making everything reusable, recyclable and biodegradable. While the switch to sustainable outer packaging is a direct response to requests from consumers, the company’s product ingredients are plant-based and organically grown, some harvested from All Good’s own farm. The brand’s commitment to staying away from harmful ingredients means no oxybenzone, gluten, phthalates or parabens. Ingredients grown on the company’s farm rely on regenerative agricultural practices in alignment with sustainable practices. Many products are made in a solar-powered community kitchen. A second product release, called the Get Glowing Lip and Cheek Tint collection, is equally botanically and organically formulated with a focus on ingredients like shea butter and avocado oil, as well as calendula harvested from the same organic farm near Morro Bay, California. The kit includes four colors of blush: rosy beige, coral golden pink, jam berry and shimmer to match any mood. They are packaged in recyclable glass jars. Each of these products is reef-friendly and provides broad spectrum SPF 15 protection. Is All Good really all good? All Good offered to send me a sample kit for review and promptly shipped the Plastic Free Body Care Set. I should start by saying I’m not much of a skincare aficionado and would go so far as to say that my lack of a skincare routine makes my skin health-conscious daughter cringe. However, I am dedicated to sun protection in the form of sunscreen and lip care, so I was excited to dig into my kit. The packaging the kit was sent in was minimalistic , plastic-free and recyclable as expected. The canvas bag is really cute in a very natural way. The statement is clear with the plain earthy colors, and the adorable little turtle is a nice touch and personal favorite of mine. I first grabbed for the Goop Skin Relief Balm. This was my favorite product for a very simple reason — I love the scent. Made with organic herbs and olive oil, I wouldn’t really call it scented. It just smells nourishing, and it is. Since I had just spent the weekend hauling wood for my home’s fireplaces, I had plenty of battle wounds to nurture. The compound is buttery without being greasy. It made my rough knuckles and scraped arms soft and a bit shimmery. Even though I liked the aroma, it was a bit strong for me. However, I’d put myself in the category of extremely scent-sensitive, so the power of the product’s scent might not be a problem for everyone. Next, I reached for the Coconut Body Lotion. I found the consistency luxurious. Although it’s made with cocoa butter and rosehip oil, it doesn’t leave an oily residue. My dry skin (remember aforementioned fireplaces) drank it in willingly, and the results were immediate. The hand and body lotion is high-quality. A little goes a long way, and a single application left my hands feeling soft and looking supple for hours — even with all the handwashing. Unfortunately the coconut smell was a little strong for me, although I imagine most people would find it to be subtle. If you like coconut, you would probably describe it as pleasant. My daughter immediately rehomed it as a favor to my senses, or so she says. I moved on to the reef-friendly, SPF 50 Tinted Mineral Sunscreen Butter. While the lotion and Goop came in glass jars, the sunscreen is housed in a tin. It’s recently been 36°F and cloudy, so I wasn’t able to test it at the beach; All Good reports it is water-resistant for up to 80 minutes. The tint looks dark but was subtle when applied to my off-season pale skin. It is a butter, so it has a slightly heavy feel. Although I would say it felt a bit greasy, I can see how that is beneficial for the sunscreen protection requirements. Lastly was the Hydrating Coconut Lip Balm. Admittedly, I am obsessed with lip-moisturizing products. What I lack in skincare products, I make up for in readily-available lip balms in every corner of my home and car. This lip balm lives up to the name. It’s hydrating, nourishing and unequivocally coconut. I loved the texture and moisturizing aspects, but, again, the scent was too much for me. My teenage son quickly adopted it and reports he loves the way it smells and feels on his lips. The packaging is unique to any roll-up lip balm I’ve used, and I deeply appreciate the design away from plastic. In addition to the products, the kit came with a nice message from the company, printed on a seed paper you can plant and watch grow into wildflowers. I thought this was a lovely touch and dynamic way to show the All Good commitment to a sustainable business model. + All Good Images via All Good and Dawn Hammon / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by All Good. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

More here:
This plastic-free, organic personal care kit is ‘All Good’

There are no ‘silver bullet’ solutions to plastics

December 7, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on There are no ‘silver bullet’ solutions to plastics

There are no ‘silver bullet’ solutions to plastics Lauren Phipps Mon, 12/07/2020 – 01:30 Every so often, a corporate announcement gets under my skin. (I’m guessing, dear reader, this sort of thing never happens to you.) The latest culprit: Bacardi unveiled a bioplastic bottle that can biodegrade in compost systems, freshwater and oceans in 18 months. Bacardi is calling its initiative “a silver bullet in the fight against plastic pollution.” Respectfully, I’m calling it B.S.  First and foremost, context is queen. With limited global composting infrastructure, the likelihood that a theoretically biodegradable bottle will be composted in practice is low. Next, layer in the reality that industrial composters don’t actually want bioplastics contaminating their organics streams (unless they can increase the nutrient-rich food waste entering into the facility). Now, add into the mix that compostable bioplastics often look identical to recyclable bioplastics (not to mention their resemblance to recyclable and non-recyclable, petroleum-based plastics), compounding consumer confusion and leading to more bottles in the wrong bins.  For these reasons, and many others , bioplastics can often create more problems than solutions.  Don’t get me wrong: Perfection can’t be the enemy of the good. (It’s also worth noting that plastic makes up less than 1 percent of Bacardi’s packaging.) But we’re left with the unfortunate acknowledgment that Bacardi is designing bottles to end up in waterways and oceans rather than investing in infrastructure to prevent marine plastics in the first place. If companies such as Bacardi indeed want to work towards more sustainable and circular systems, it’s incumbent upon them to invest in materials innovations, along with the enabling infrastructure for them to succeed.  What irked me most about the Bacardi story is that there are, of course, no silver bullets. Even writing that sentence makes me cringe at its cliché, as I’m sure anyone working in sustainability or circularity would agree. Plastic pollution is a complex, systemic challenge that is produced and reproduced by disconnected design decisions, short-sighted business models, insufficient infrastructure, patchwork policy and misinformed consumer behavior, to name a few of the culprits.  In my opinion, the material itself is not the crux of the problem — nor can it be the “silver bullet” of the solution. Complex problems require a suite of diverse solutions — silver buckshot, as the cliché goes.  Topics Circular Economy Plastic Plastic Waste Biomaterials Featured Column In the Loop Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Bacardi’s 100 percent biodegradable bottle will replace 80 million plastic bottles – 3,000 tons of plastic – currently produced by the company across its portfolio of brands every year. Courtesy of Bacardi Close Authorship

Here is the original post:
There are no ‘silver bullet’ solutions to plastics

Treat Fido and Fluffy with these eco-friendly holiday gifts for pets

December 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Treat Fido and Fluffy with these eco-friendly holiday gifts for pets

Our  pets  constantly give to us, from a morning lick on the forehead to a bedtime purr. They bring out our best, most loving selves, and inspire us to get exercise in all types of weather. Even when they’re naughty — climbing the Christmas tree, zooming around the house when you’re trying to sleep, begging for a taste of your food — they’re so dang cute. They deserve to be number one on our gifting lists, so here are some eco-friendly gifts they’ll enjoy this holiday season. Wool toy Does your  dog  love a good game of tug-of-war? These 100% domestic wool  LooHoo Wooly Tug Toys  are soft enough not to hurt Spot’s teeth but easy to get a grip on. The 14- to 16-inch length gives you extra space between your hand and those powerful doggy teeth. Related: Keep your cat safe with these eco-friendly cat toys Zero-waste pet kit As those with canine companions know, walking Fido serves multiple purposes, not just exercise. In addition to quality time together, walks provide an opportunity for your dog to … um … let loose. With the  Zero Waste Fur Baby Kit , you won’t have to worry about  plastic  bags sitting in the landfill for the next few centuries. The kit includes biodegradable dog waste bags, plus a dog brush, conditioning dog shampoo bar and a toy. Fido will look his best while also saving the planet. Organic catnip During the recent election results, was Tigger showing signs of great cat interest — such as opening her eyes, or even blinking — when state measures on recreational marijuana passed? She’s clearly trying to tell you something. Sprinkle this USDA-certified  organic catnip  on toys or scratching posts, and your kitty will soon be rolling around on the floor in all sorts of silly positions. Dog shampoo bar Every dog owner believes (incorrectly) they have the world’s cutest dog (sorry, I do!). But we don’t always like to admit that sometimes our dogs can be a little smelly. This organic  natural shampoo bar  combines cedarwood and lavender with organic shea butter, castor oil, soap nuts and calendula. The castor oil and shea butter softly penetrate even the coarsest fur. Your dog will love the skin-soothing feel and anti-inflammatory benefits of calendula. Endorsed by cats that want the dog in the household to smell better. Cat basket Many people who live with cats notice that their little friends can get crabby if they aren’t allowed to sleep about 16 hours a day. All this sleeping should take place somewhere that befits your elegant cat. This  fair trade cat basket  is made of recycled saris , recycled plastic and hogla grass, which grows abundantly in Bangladesh, where this basket is made. The pillow and pillow cover are washable. At 13 inches in diameter and 11 inches high, this basket best fits the petite feline. Wood pet tags Rover can proudly wear this attractive  pet tag , and if/when he roves, it will be easy for somebody to direct him home using the tag’s info. Choose from natural, chestnut or black wood in various sizes of bones or circles. These tags are handmade in Palo Alto,  California and promise to be “water/drool and tear resistant.” Pet bowls These  bowls by Whom  artistically blend  wood  and metal in a way that will enhance the corner of your kitchen floor far more than an ordinary, plastic food bowl. As the website promises, “Each is manufactured to order and handmade by our expert craftsman. No warehouse full of these!” It’s kind of like getting Mr. Whiskers a bespoke suit instead of buying him something off the rack. There are even double and triple bowls for pets that enjoy eating next to each other. A word of warning, though — once you buy a beautiful custom bowl, Mr. Whiskers might expect you to fill it with filet mignon, not kibble. Paw rescue balm Do your hands dry out on those cold  winter  days? Well, dog and cat paws can, too.  Organic Winter Dog Paw Rescue Balm  eases the pain of chapped noses and rough paw pads. It uses natural ingredients like coconut oil, beeswax, shea butter, olive oil, calendula, vetiver and rosemary. While this treatment will feel divine for many pets, always check with your vet before applying any new topical products to your fur friends. Magical malachite Friendship Collar Paws down, this is one of the cutest  gifts  you can give this holiday season: matching vegan, cruelty-free, scratch-resistant bracelet and collar sets for human/canine duos. Buy a set for you and your dog, and extra sets to give as gifts to all your dog-loving friends. For every  Friendship Collar  set you buy, the maker will donate six pounds of food to shelter animals. Eco-friendly treats Is your best friend food-motivated? V-Dog makes  cruelty-free treats  that include pumpkin, carrots, broccoli and spinach in the ingredients list.  Pet Naturals of Vermont  has a whole line of treats that do double duty: tasting delicious while cutting down on Fluffy’s hairballs and easing hip and joint pain. Images via Unsplash, LooHoo, Package Free Shop, Pixabay, Eco Girl Shop, WoodLeon, Whom Home, BestFriendBeauty, Friendship Collar and V-Dog

Here is the original post: 
Treat Fido and Fluffy with these eco-friendly holiday gifts for pets

ESW Beauty makes eco-friendly sheet masks your skin will love

November 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on ESW Beauty makes eco-friendly sheet masks your skin will love

Eco-conscious skincare connoisseurs often face a dilemma. We know single-use products cause unnecessary waste, yet the sheet mask craze shows no sign of stopping. It’s easy to see why sheet masks remain popular; when you can simply rip open a package, slap on a mess-free sheet mask and go about your day, it’s hard to go back to multi-step wash-off or peel-off masks. Still, few people would argue that the convenience and skincare benefits of sheet masks outweigh the environmental harm and extra waste these products create. Offering a solution to this puzzling problem, ESW Beauty ‘s Raw Juice Cleanse Sheet Masks will help your skin without harming the environment. What is ESW Beauty? Started by Elina Sofia Wang, ESW Beauty began as part of Wang’s search for a cleaner lifestyle. While struggling with health issues, Wang started drinking raw juices and exploring clean beauty options. Unable to find sheet masks that suited her needs, the ESW Beauty founder decided to make her own. By combining a non-toxic, cruelty-free and eco-friendly formula with Wang’s love for raw juices, the Raw Juice Cleanse Sheet Masks were born. What goes into an eco-friendly sheet mask? As the ESW Beauty website so eloquently states, “Our mission is to develop beauty products made with clean, ethically-sourced, and sustainable ingredients . We firmly believe product formulation and ingredients should be held to a higher standard.” What does this mean for ESW’s sheet masks? First, it guarantees that each mask’s formula prioritizes clean ingredients. That means no parabens, phthalates, synthetic fragrances or dyes, formaldehydes, alcohol, silicones or animal-derived ingredients. No animal-derived ingredients ensures that these sheet masks, both the serum and fabric, are fully vegan . As a company of animal lovers, ESW Beauty also keeps its products cruelty-free, pledging to never test on animals. This dedication to vegan and cruelty-free formulas earned ESW certifications from both Leaping Bunny and PETA. But what about the waste issue with sheet masks? To minimize single-use sheet masks’ environmental impact, ESW takes a two-fold approach. Starting with the packaging, ESW’s mask pouches use recyclable low-density polyethylene (LDPE), a material that, while plastic, has been found by a Danish Environmental Protection Agency study to produce the smallest environmental impact among alternatives such as paper , bioplastic and cotton. Once you open the pouch, the mask itself uses a material called cupra (also known as cupro), a sustainable and biodegradable fabric made from cotton linter, which is usually discarded as waste during cotton processing. Reviewing the sheet masks Packaged in an inviting white and blue box, a free editorial sample of ESW Beauty’s Masking & Juicing Essentials Set arrived at my door for review. After unboxing, I surveyed the exciting products inside. The eco-friendly beauty and skincare field isn’t typically known for eye-catching aesthetics, but ESW’s clever designs eschew the industry-standard brown and green color scheme in favor of something more fun. The colorful, bottle-shaped mask pouches not only fit with the raw juice theme but are also a delightful addition to my bathroom counter. Masks aren’t the only treats this kit has in store. In addition to a box of all five sheet masks in the Raw Juice Cleanse line, the full Masking & Juicing Essentials Set includes a clear tote bag, canvas sheet mask travel pouch, clear glass bottle and sprout headband. Right now, ESW Beauty is also including free stickers with every order. While the clear tote, canvas pouch and glass bottle are all cute and handy parts of the set, I was most excited for the sheet masks (obviously) and sprout headband. Before trying out the masks, I slipped on the soft sprout headband to keep my hair out of my face. The headband’s soft material might cause it to slip down your head if you have fine-textured hair, but for me, it did a good job of staying in place. Upon first trying out one of the masks (the delicious-sounding Strawberries & Cream Soothing Raw Juice Mask ), I was pleased to find that it included plenty of serum. No dry masks here! The soft mask material is a great vessel for the serum and contoured well to my face for the entire 20-minute application time. As the weather turns colder and starts drying out and irritating my skin, this mask and The Pink Dream Moisturizing Raw Juice Mask were my favorites for helping my skin recover and look healthy again. But what if your skin needs some extra, targeted attention? If you need a rejuvenating boost, the Pineapple Bliss Revitalizing Raw Juice Mask can help get your skin glowing again. I also enjoyed the Deep Detox Pore Control Raw Juice Mask ‘s slight tingle; I could feel the mask working and appreciated how smooth my skin felt afterward. As a baby-faced 23-year-old, I didn’t expect to see major results from the Green Reset Anti-Aging Raw Juice Mask , but I did notice a slight improvement in the fine lines on my forehead after use. Whether you want something need-specific or simply a luxurious, eco-friendly moisture boost, ESW Raw Juice Face Masks are a choice that your skin and the environment will thank you for. + ESW Beauty Images by Grae Gleason / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by ESW Beauty. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

The rest is here: 
ESW Beauty makes eco-friendly sheet masks your skin will love

Mio Borsa unveils summer collection of vegan leather bags

August 5, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Mio Borsa unveils summer collection of vegan leather bags

Mio Borsa, a vegan leather bag brand based in New Delhi, has unveiled its Spring/Summer 2020 collection of handbags. This stylish, cruelty-free line is made using Piñatex, an eco-textile made from pineapple stems. Mio Borsa founder Palavi Behl believes that fashion should be about holistic trends and integrity. As such, Behl created a line of cruelty-free , vegan leather handbags to show the world what fashion can be without using animal skins of any kind. The line includes bucket, drawstring zip, baguette box, sling and shoulder bags as well as clutches and totes. Related: Dutch designer creates leather alternative from palm leaves The vegan leather is not just environmentally friendly — it is highly durable and wears well. It is also dirt-resistant, making it easy to clean. Mio Borsa’s vegan leather is made with a combination of pineapple stem extract and polyurethane, a synthetic resin. Polyurethane is often used as a wood sealant because of its resistant to water, abrasions and stains. The Mio Borsa bags feature both modern and classic silhouettes, each with a distinctive look. While they are certainly beautiful, they are also functional and affordable, as the designer hopes to make sustainable fashion more accessible. Each bag is offered in multiple colors, so you can choose a favorite or buy multiple hues to coordinate with your outfits. For centuries, fashion has required great sacrifice from the animal kingdom. Fur made with mink, leather made from the hide of cows, snakeskin, alligator skin — the list goes on and on. Now, it’s time to move into a new era of fashion: cruelty-free fashion. There are lots of ways to shop sustainably and stylishly at the same time, and Mio Borsa is here to prove just that. “While leather requires the skin of animals, faux and vegan leather offer alternatives that keep us looking good and doing good,” the company said. “And not only is it better for the world, it’s better for our closets and wallets too: vegan leather is almost always cheaper than the real thing, and can be versatile and adapted to whatever our needs are.” + Mio Borsa Images via Mio Borsa

More: 
Mio Borsa unveils summer collection of vegan leather bags

Kangaroo leather sporting goods illegally sold in California

July 29, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Kangaroo leather sporting goods illegally sold in California

Nearly 5 years after California outlawed the sale of products made from kangaroo skin, over 100 retailers are still selling these items. In 2016, the California Penal Code § 653o went into effect, banning the sale and import of athletic shoes made from kangaroo leather, or k-leather. However, a recent investigation by the Center for a Humane Economy (CHE) has proven otherwise. In the investigation, which spanned several months, CHE has established that the majority of 117 physical specialty stores and 76 online retailers are selling products made with kangaroo skin . The investigation has found that some leading retailers, such as Dick’s Sporting Goods, Nike and New Balance, are still stocking k-leather products years after the ban. According to the California Penal Code § 653o, any person found selling or importing k-leather products could face penalties of up to $5,000 and six months in jail. Such penalties have not stopped retailers from selling the products, in part due to a lack of enforcement. Even some of the leading shoe brands are still producing k-leather products years after the legislation was put in place. Related: Dutch designer creates leather alternative from palm leaves In a recent attempt to determine whether Nike still produces k-leather products, Robert Ferber, a former Los Angeles city prosecutor specializing in animal cruelty crimes, ordered a pair of shoes from Nike. He requested that the shoes be made with k-leather. “I’ve ordered pairs of Tiempo Legend 8 Elite to see if Nike was following the law,” Ferber said. “Except for a brief period this spring, the shoes I ordered through Nike.com appeared promptly and illegally on my doorstep.” In Australia alone, approximately 2 million kangaroos are killed annually for their skin. Given that their skin is very tough, it is a popular choice for sporting goods manufacturers that want to make durable products. CHE and other organizations are now collaborating to end the use of kangaroo leather . CHE has created a list of companies that use kangaroo skin and specifically outlined which products include this material in a bid to discourage people from buying these items. + CHE Via VegNews Image via Terri Sharp

See the original post: 
Kangaroo leather sporting goods illegally sold in California

Expedition Bigfoot casts new light on famous forest dweller with science and conservation in mind

December 11, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Expedition Bigfoot casts new light on famous forest dweller with science and conservation in mind

In an era where people take “unplugged” vacations, there’s something idyllic about a hairy biped that looks just a little bit like us but has no use for our high-tech ways. Ironically, Expedition Bigfoot, a new Travel Channel show, is using the advanced technology that Sasquatch eschews to track this elusive creature all while celebrating the mysteries of nature and the importance of science and conservation . Expedition Bigfoot assembles an elite team of Bigfoot researchers for its eight-part series, which debuted December 8. A Bigfoot sighting algorithm helped them select the most promising three weeks of the year to search a 90,000-acre swath of central Oregon . The show promises “possible nesting sites, footprints and vocalizations,” “inexplicable events” and “one of the greatest pieces of video evidence in Bigfoot history,” according to the Travel Channel website. The Expedition Bigfoot cast includes Bryce Johnson overseeing expedition operations, Bigfoot researchers Ryan Golembeske, Russell Acord and Ronny LeBlanc, and primatologist Dr. Mireya Mayor. Inhabitat caught up with Acord, who spoke while en route to the annual Sasquatch Summit in Washington. Acord’s answers here have been edited for space. Inhabitat: What drives you to find Bigfoot? Acord: It’s that chase. I got interested in the same thing that got everybody else interested, that ’67 footage. That, to date, has been the best footage that anyone has ever seen. I want to find something equally impressive and capture that same kind of Class-A sighting on film and just be part of that. But I can’t think of a better hobby other than being out in the wilderness, breathing all that beautiful air, climbing the mountains , looking for something like this. So it’s a win/win. Inhabitat: How did you get involved with Expedition Bigfoot? Acord: I think the producers were looking for boots-on-the-ground researchers. Collectively as a team, I can’t imagine working with somebody else on something this important. They’re definitely the A Team, and I feel very, very honored to be part of this as a researcher. Inhabitat: Are you a 100 percent believer? Acord: I am a 100 percent researcher . I believe in the possibility. I believe that there’s so much out there that we have yet to discover. I don’t think for a second that it’s not possible. There’s too much historical evidence, there’s too much evidence that we’ve run into that points directly to that. I believe in the possibility. Absolutely. Inhabitat: What is your best guess on what Bigfoot is, based on research? Acord: I grew up hunting in Montana , so I know that if it leaves tracks, it’s got body weight. If it makes sounds, it’s got lungs in order to make a sound. If it pushes things around, it’s got muscle mass. I believe it to be a forest animal. I use the word “animal” loosely. I believe it to be of the forest, flesh and blood, that doesn’t need our electricity, our roads or our technology to survive. I think that it’s done a darned good job staying out of our path and avoiding us. Wherever it inhabits, wherever it lies, it is certainly not hurting our ecosystem whatsoever. I think that we’re encroaching on its space. Inhabitat: What is its range? Acord: I would think anywhere where there’s resources. I don’t think that we’re going to find him in the middle of the desert , but where there’s resources, trees, water. We’re all the same way. Humans are the same. I can physically walk from coast to coast if I take the time to do it. So I think there’s no limit to their range as far as where they can and will go for survival. Inhabitat: Do you ever worry about what’s going to happen if you find Bigfoot? Acord: That’s a double-edged sword. There could be two ways to look at that. Let’s suppose I’m in the Cascades and I find Bigfoot there. There will be a drive to protect that wildlife , to protect the landscape, to protect the environment. But then on the other side of it, there are ridiculous people on the planet that think that they have to be the ones that bag the big game. I don’t think you have to kill something to prove its existence. So a lot of researchers I know refuse to come forward with their findings simply because of that. Inhabitat: If you finally came face-to-face with Bigfoot, how do you think you’d react? Acord: I’m going to run up and grab a handful of chest hair. [Laughs.] I need a couple of samples. Let me get a selfie with you, let me get some pictures, but I want some hair. I always go with the camera ready, too. I will get as much documentation as possible. Especially face-to-face, within 5 to 10 feet, I’m going to be rolling every piece of film I’ve got and collect as much as I possibly can, as far as evidence goes. But if I can get close enough to grab a handful of fur, I’m grabbing it. Inhabitat: What are the most important pieces of equipment you have now that earlier Bigfoot seekers didn’t have? Acord: I have military-grade thermal imaging. It will not only record on the device itself, but I can also sync it to my Bluetooth and run it off my iPhone. I have night vision goggles. Anything that records is definitely key. One thing that you should always take with you is DNA collection. Take nitrile gloves, tweezers and a way to put it into a sealed environment . Don’t touch it with your skin, don’t breathe on it and just don’t contaminate it. Grab what you can, and research it once you get out to where you have the equipment. I have a microscope on my truck. Inhabitat: What do you want viewers to know about Expedition Bigfoot, without spoiling any surprises? Acord: The show is based on real, authentic research . It’s based on how we conduct ourselves in the field, what kind of technology is available to us and actually getting out there and doing it. The show is about consuming a piece of land, methodically working through it and really looking and doing in-depth research. The results certainly paid off. + Expedition Bigfoot + Russell Acord Images via Expedition Bigfoot and Adam Neil

See more here: 
Expedition Bigfoot casts new light on famous forest dweller with science and conservation in mind

The ultimate guide to eco-friendly period products

July 31, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on The ultimate guide to eco-friendly period products

If you’re a person who is serious about protecting the environment, you’re probably conscious of how much trash you generate every time you have a period. In addition to being chock-full of plastics sent straight to landfills, pads and tampons also contain harsh chemicals that are toxic . Yet most people continue exposing their bodies to these products month after month. Luckily, there are better options out there for both you and the planet — here’s a guide to help you find what might work best for you. “Anything coming in constant contact with your skin will land in your bloodstream for distribution throughout your body,” Dr. Joseph Mercola wrote in an alarming Huffington Post article about the dangers of menstrual products. Despite the potential dangers, the chemical ingredients in tampons and pads are an industry secret, protected by nondisclosure policies that favor corporations, manufacturers and innovators but put consumers at serious risk. So if you want to cut down on polluting nature and your body, consider this comprehensive guide on more sustainable product options available right now. As always, be sure to consult with your healthcare provider to help determine the best options for you. Menstrual cups Menstrual cups are one of the most eco-friendly options out there. If you can get over the initial learning curve, they are easy and convenient to use. Why we love them Although the up-front sticker price is higher, when you calculate how much you spend every month on tampons or pads, the savings are obvious. The cups are comfortable and barely noticeable once they have been inserted — the same way you might get used to a tampon and hardly realize it is there. They are especially easy for travelers who want to save precious space in their luggage and say goodbye to last-minute, emergency trips to the convenience store. Most cup brands come in multiple sizes and some even come in varying levels of firmness, depending on your preference, flow, age and whether or not you have had a vaginal birth. The cups are capable of handling even heavy flow days, with most users reporting minimal — if any — leaks. Below is a brief review of a few popular brands. Diva Cup ($35) The Diva Cup is the most recognized and popular brand. It has three sizes (including one for teens), lasts up to 12 hours and is made from medical-grade silicone. Sustain Natural Period Cup ($39) These cups are flexible, compact and made entirely of medical-grade silicone . They claim to hold three tampons-worth of liquid and are available in two sizes. This is also the only brand that currently offers a microwave case for cleaning the cup. Peachlife Menstrual Cup ($22) Also made of medical-grade silicone, this cup uniquely comes in a variety of firmness levels (soft, medium-firm and extra-firm). Unlike other brands that come to a point, the Peachlife cup has a silicone ring at the bottom for easy removal (but remember, you still have to break the suction of the cup; you cannot just tug on the ring!). Cups are not without challenges Menstrual cups cannot be recycled at the end of their lifecycles, but when you calculate how many pads and tampons you averted from landfills, this product is worth it. The cups can also be difficult to maneuver at first. Once you have practiced and get the hang of folding the cup, inserting it and then breaking the seal to remove, it’s just as easy as any other option. It typically takes about three periods to fully adapt to using a menstrual cup. Because of cultural and religious beliefs, some people do have objections or hesitations to using a cup. Related: Study shows menstrual cups are safe and just as effective as tampons, pads A new spin on ‘period underwear’ Absorbent underwear brands like THINX and Lunapads are increasing in popularity and market share. They are simply underwear that you wear during your period that are specially manufactured to absorb menstrual blood. Why they’re so easy If you know how to put on your undies, then you know how to use these — they have all other products beat in terms of ease of use. They are also eco-friendly, because you wash and reuse them each time you have your period. That means they do not produce landfill trash every month. The downside of absorbent underwear Period underwear is more expensive than your typical pair of underwear because of their patented absorption technology . You will also need a few pairs depending on the length and flow of your period and how often you’re able to wash and dry them. Like the cups though, when you tally the cost of underwear against lifetime tampon expenses, they’re a smart economic choice. The horrors of tampons and better options “The average American woman uses 16,800 tampons in her lifetime — or up to 24,360 if she’s on estrogen replacement therapy,” said Dr. Mercola. That’s a lot of trash , but it is also a lot of time that your body is exposed to toxic chemicals. Cotton is better; organic cotton is best You may have heard health experts say that cotton underwear is best for promoting vaginal health — the same goes for tampons. Look for brands that specifically say they are made from organic cotton, but assume that most conventional brands are now made from plastics and synthetic materials. These materials are not breathable, can get fragmented and left behind and might encourage health problems like yeast and bacterial growth. Most tampons are also bleached with substances linked to abnormal tissue growth, abnormal cell growth and immune system suppression. Americans use 7 billion tampon applicators every year; the chemicals in the applicator, phthalates, have been generally linked to organ damage, lower I.Q. and asthma. What to try instead Using tampons without applicators will significantly cut down the plastic waste you generate. Brands like o.b. offer tampons that can be inserted with just your finger. Seventh Generation offers a chlorine-free, organic cotton tampon that reduces your exposure to chemicals. Organyc also offers a 100 percent organic cotton tampon. What about pads? Many people prefer pads for comfort or cultural reasons; however, the average sanitary pad contains “the equivalent of about four plastic bags, and this doesn’t include the other chemicals like BPA , BPS, phthalates and toxic dioxin created by the bleaching process.” Even though they have plastic in them, pads are never recyclable because they have been contaminated with bodily fluid. Because pads have a bigger volume than tampons, they produce even more waste. The average person throws away between 250 and 300 pounds of pads or tampons in their lifetime. What to use if you prefer pads There are reusable sanitary pads online that significantly reduce the amount of trash produced. Simply place the pad in your underwear; when it is dirty, rinse it with cold water and then add it to the laundry. You can buy reusable pads from Gladrags or find cute designs via Etsy. You can also try your hand at sewing your own . Disposable tampons and pads dominate the menstrual care market, but it doesn’t have to be that way. With small personal changes, you can protect your health, wallet and the planet. Images via Shutterstock

The rest is here: 
The ultimate guide to eco-friendly period products

A Swiss forest gains a sculptural, sustainably minded water purification plant

June 24, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A Swiss forest gains a sculptural, sustainably minded water purification plant

Most water purification plants are devoid of personality, but that’s not so for the Swiss city of Muttenz’s new water treatment facility. Designed by international architectural firm Oppenheim Architecture , the Muttenz Water Purification Plant rejects the sterile stereotype and adopts a curving and organic form that looks as if the building was naturally sculpted out of the earth. Set within a lush green forest next to the river Rhine, the low-maintenance industrial plant not only sensitively and sustainably adapts to its natural surroundings, but also serves as a new city landmark that includes a public-facing area to educate the population about the facility’s three-phased, state-of-the-art water purification process. The Muttenz Water Purification Plant is encased entirely with shotcrete, also known as sprayed concrete, which was delivered dry to the construction site and then mixed with water just before application. Shotcrete was selected because of the sensitive nature of the construction site in a drinking water protection zone. The expressive and low-maintenance facade appears both soft in appearance yet hard in texture and allows rainwater to flow from the roof across the sides, which will gradually leave a natural patina and encourage the growth of moss over time to blend the building into the landscape. Related: This moss can naturally eliminate arsenic from water “The engineering-driven arrangement of the inner life defines the form and the size of the building,” explained the architects, who noted that the water purification building is set between a protected forest and the nearby industrial parks. “Like a tight dress, the skin presses against it and represents the technical inner life to the outside. Pipelines, filters and apparatuses can be read through the facade in an abstract manner. The result is an expressive building, acting like a ‘objet trouvé’ in its natural context. Reduced to its materiality and form.” To heighten the educational experience for the public, the water purification plant puts parts of its complex and its state-of-the-art technology on display. One example is the open, alcove-like presentation room that is open to the outdoors and allows visitors to experience water from multiple perspectives, from the cooling sensation of the surrounding pool to the sounds and sights of rainwater pouring in from the roof. + Oppenheim Architecture Photography by Bo?rje Mu?ller via Oppenheim Architecture

Read the original post:
A Swiss forest gains a sculptural, sustainably minded water purification plant

Anti-pollution skincare products: Everything you need to know

April 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Anti-pollution skincare products: Everything you need to know

Anti-pollution skincare products are the latest trend in the skincare industry. As people battle an increasingly toxic atmosphere, these products promise to combat harmful particles associated with pollution in major cities. These products work by cleansing the skin from nanoparticles that are absorbed from the air or by creating a protective barrier that acts as a shield against pollutants. But just how effective are anti-pollution skincare products? The need for pollution protection The call for beauty products that are anti-pollution has significantly increased as city dwellers around the world continue to battle poor air quality . The micro-particles present in pollution have been proven to age skin at a rate similar to the sun, leading many people to look for ways to protect their body. Online searches for skincare products that are anti-pollution have gone up some 73 percent this year alone. This shows how much people are concerned about the aging effects of pollution and how it harms skin. Related: Add this all-in-one natural skincare to your bathroom counter “We’re seeing an increasing global demand for skincare which counters pollution-related skin concerns including dull skin, inflammation, sensitized skin, blemishes, clogged pores and accelerated ageing,” Dr. Anna Persaud, the head of This Works makeup company, explained. Pollution causes skin issues Studies have shown that certain pollutants in the atmosphere can lead to skin-related problems. The University of British Columbia lead a study that connected nitrogen dioxide to dark spots on the skin. Nitrogen dioxide is a result of car exhaust and emissions from power plants. While people are more aware of the harmful effects of pollution, cities continue to battle poor air quality. In fact, the World Health Organization released a study in 2016 that showed how air pollution had increased eight percent over the previous five years. In densely populated cities around the world – such as Delhi and Beijing – the public is often warned about hazardous levels of air pollution. Indoor pollution is also a growing issue Air quality indoors is also something people need to be concerned about when it comes to skincare. Indoor pollution comes from a variety of sources, from cooking and heating to cleaning products that off-gas into the environment, all of which can damage the health of your skin. With people battling pollution at every turn, there is little wonder that the anti-pollution skincare industry has grown so much over the past decade. How does anti-pollution skincare work? Products that are marketed as anti-pollution help shield the skin from harmful dust particles, very similar to how sunscreens work. Other skincare products remove pollutants from the skin after you have been exposed. The most popular of these types of products are beauty masks, which cleanse the skin at a deeper level than traditional masks. Peach and Lilly , for example, offer a series of anti-pollution masks and other products that are aimed at reducing the effects of microparticles. While these products can remove harmful nanoparticles, there are no scientific studies to back up their effectiveness. The lack of data is largely due to the fact that anti-pollution skincare has not been around long. Another factor is that the products are only used once a day, and after the masks are removed the skin is once again open for exposure. Tips for choosing the best anti-pollution skincare products While masks can remove pollutants in the short-term, leave-on products are the best way to combat microparticles in the atmosphere. These types of products will protect you for longer durations of time and prevent your skin from coming into contact with harmful particles in the first place. You can also look for products that contain high levels of probiotics. These chemicals can help build up the skin’s natural defenses and form a barrier against pollution-related skin issues. That is not to say that anti-pollution masks are not beneficial, but they do leave the skin open to future attacks. The science behind anti-pollution skincare A lot of the anti-pollution skincare products feature vitamin C as the main ingredient. Vitamin C can lighten skin tone – which helps combat those dark spots linked to pollution – and decreases discoloration. Another common ingredient in these types of products are antioxidants, many of which are actually backed by science. Unfortunately, there are not a lot of studies that prove barrier products are effective at keeping particles from invading your skin. That does not mean they do not work, but more studies need to be done to prove just how effective they are in creating a pollution barrier. Given the popularity of these types of products , it won’t be long before additional research is completed. Fighting pollution While products that protect the skin are great, the bigger issue is fighting pollution at its source. Many cities are initiating eco-friendly policies to help curb emissions, but more work needs to be done if we are serious about combating the effects pollution has on our health. Unfortunately, companies that manufacture anti-pollution skincare products have little motivation to fight pollution at a large scale, as doing so would ultimately hurt their bottom line. Via The Guardian , Racked Images via Rawpixel , Moose Photos , Stux ,  AdinaVoicu ,  joiseyshowaa

See the rest here:
Anti-pollution skincare products: Everything you need to know

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 3281 access attempts in the last 7 days.