"FORGO" plastic packaging with powder to liquid hand wash

April 8, 2020 by  
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Plastic containers  line nearly every shelf of any health and beauty aisle. To tackle this earth-endangering practice, Stockholm-based design studio Form Us With Love set out to make personal care more sustainable with their first product in this endeavor, FORGO powdered hand soap. Although the design company has launched other product campaigns, including furniture in conjunction with notable icon IKEA, FORGO targets making an impactful change to the personal care industry.  The name FORGO, meaning “to do without,” captures the essence of the hand wash, the first product in what Form us With Love hopes will be an entire line of personal care products. This hand wash is made using the bare essentials, from the ingredients list to the packing materials, embracing minimalism  throughout the process for all the right reasons. Related:  This skincare and natural deodorant is made from apple cider vinegar FORGO is a lightweight and compact powder you mix up at home. During your initial order, the company sends a glass jar with a fill line mark for easy measuring. Your job is simply to open the package, dump the powder into the glass jar, fill with water and shake. In less than a minute, you have a full bottle of foaming hand soap ready to go. When you run low, you can have three more packages sent directly to your home with free shipping throughout Europe and North America. For the initial run, FORGO is only available for these areas, but they hope to expand to other countries in the future. FORGO is produced in a partnership with a Montreal-based lab specializing in natural cosmetics. The result is a product that uses only six essential ingredients over 1%. All ingredients are naturally derived , and all are considered safe by EWG Skin Deep®. Five are COSMOS certified (COSMetic Organic and natural Standard). The scents for the foaming soap are also natural, with the wood scent distilled from timber yard scraps in Canada and the citrus scent distilled from leftover peels and pulp from organic citrus in the Caribbean.  The packaging is also mindful, using only recycled and recyclable paper to contain the powder and ship it, along with the glass jar, which can be recycled and is non-toxic should it end up in a landfill. The steel pump can be returned to the company for proper recycling . The compact packaging reduces waste and produces significantly fewer transport emissions, with 18 packets of FORGO equaling approximately one plastic bottle of a premixed solution. A now fully-funded Kickstarter campaign boosted the initial launch, with the first round of shipments expected summer 2020. + FORGO Images via Jonas Lindström Studio, Fredrik Augustsson, and Anna Heck & Yujin Jiang

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"FORGO" plastic packaging with powder to liquid hand wash

How to make milk alternatives at home

April 8, 2020 by  
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Milk alternatives have become a booming industry. More and more people are choosing plant-based milk alternatives because they can be healthier. These options are also cruelty-free and better for the planet. Plus, in these times when grocery store offerings are sparse, non-dairy milks — or at least the ingredients to make them — are often more readily available and shelf-stable. Here are some tips for making your own milk alternatives , such as oat milk, almond milk, coconut milk and more. Types of plant-based milk Grocery stores typically carry a wide variety of milk substitutes: soy, almond, cashew, hazelnut, oat, rice, coconut, pea-protein and even flax seed. But homemade varieties can be healthier, and during a pandemic when it is hard to come across any milk — vegan or otherwise — making your own plant-based milk could be your only option. Related: How to choose the healthiest, most sustainable milk alternative Advantages of making your own plant-based milk Despite the popularity of brand names, sometimes making homemade non-dairy milk is preferred over store-bought. Consider how COVID-19 has made shopping in the age of social distancing a challenge. Besides, making homemade plant-based milk can save money. You can also control the consistency, flavor and sweetness of the non-dairy milk you make, avoiding unnecessary additives, like oils, thickeners and xantham gum. Homemade milk alternatives also allow you to tailor your recipes for any dietary restrictions. How to make most milk alternatives First, choose your ingredient. If you prefer soy milk, select organic , non-GMO soybeans, as suggested by One Green Planet . For nut milk, select your organic, non-GMO nut of choice, making sure they are raw. The same can be applied to oat, rice, coconut, pea and seeds (sesame or sunflower). These ingredients can all be sourced either online, at stores like Whole Foods or Sprouts or from a local farmer. Thoroughly rinse 2 cups of your ingredient of choice, whether dry soybeans or raw nuts, for example, then let them soak overnight in 5 to 6 cups of water. The next day, remove them from soaking. Discard the water and rinse off the soybeans (or nuts). Next, remove the skins (skip this step if the ingredient of choice has no skins). Add the soybeans (or nuts) to about 6 cups of water in a blender, and blend until smooth. Related: Is almond milk bad for the environment? After blending, strain the blended mixture via a muslin, cheesecloth or fine nut milk bag. Note that twisting permits the squeezing out of more milk from the pulp. After ringing out as much milk as you can, either discard the soybean pulp (in a compost bin) or save the nut pulp. Nut pulp can be frozen for later use in smoothies, pancake batters, oatmeal or granola. Next, place the strained milk in a pot or saucepan. Remember, adding more water determines the thickness and consistency of your milk. For instance, you may add about 1 cup of water to the mixture, or more if you prefer a thinner milk. Bring the mixture to a boil, while frequently stirring to avoid sticking. When at a boil, reduce to medium heat and continue heating or cooking the milk for up to 20 minutes. Make sure to continue to stir often. After the 20-minute span, cool the milk to room temperature. For added taste, stir in cocoa powder, honey or cinnamon while serving. If you want your entire batch of milk to have added flavor, place all of the liquid into a blender and mix in vanilla extract, honey, dates, berries or other fruit. How to make oat milk For oat milk , there is no need for overnight soaking. Rather, you can choose to either soak for just 30 minutes before draining and then blending, as recommended by the Simple Vegan Blog . Or, you can just immediately blend together 1 cup of rolled oats in 4 cups of water for about 30 to 45 seconds before straining. Why under 1 minute? Over-blending can make the oat milk seem slimy in texture, as observed by the Minimalist Baker . Another important adjustment is not boiling nor heating the milk mixture after straining from the pulp — heating will lead to a slimy texture, too. Note that nut milk bags might not work for oats, so try a fine mesh strainer instead. Some folks even go so far as to use a towel or clean T-shirt to strain the milk out of the pulp. How to make coconut milk For coconut milk, the Minimalist Baker recommends using 2 cups of shredded unsweetened coconut. Once you’ve acquired your coconut, blend it in 3 to 4 cups of water, noting that for thicker, creamier milk, less water is best. You’ll still strain the milk with a thin cloth, cheesecloth, nut milk bag or fine mesh strainer. Again, the pulp can be saved for future baking purposes. No need for heating of the strained milk either, just seal in a tight container in the refrigerator. Should you see separation after removing this milk from the refrigerator, simply shake it before use. How to make pea or seed milks For pea milk, Nutramilk follows the same basic methods described above, except there’s no need to boil or heat the strained milk, either. Moreover, pea pulp can be saved for soups or as an added ingredient in just about any dinner recipe. Regarding seeds, Nest and Glow says they must be soaked overnight, but there’s little need to extract skins or boiling the milk. Because they are smaller, their blend time need only be 2 to 3 minutes until finely ground. How to store homemade milk Store your homemade soy, nut, seed or oat milk in an airtight bottle within your refrigerator. It should be good for up to 3 days. Hoping to preserve the milk for longer? Your homemade, plant-based milk can be kept in the freezer for 3 to 5 months. After thawing it, you can choose to also use this homemade milk as a dairy substitute for cooking or baking. Images via Unsplash and Adobe Stock

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How to make milk alternatives at home

Anti-Aging Secrets Discovered in Yeast Could be the Key to Eternal Youth

September 11, 2013 by  
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Yeast photo from Shutterstock Who knew the secret to eternal youth could have been hiding in bread-rising yeast all this time? A team of researchers from Japan and New Zealand has found a way to double the lifespan of yeast by stabilizing a genetic sequence known as ribosomal DNA (rDNA). In a new study, published in the scientific journal Current Biology , the researchers say that doing the same thing to rDNA genes in humans could stop or slow aging for people too. Read the rest of Anti-Aging Secrets Discovered in Yeast Could be the Key to Eternal Youth Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Anti Aging , Austen Ganley , bacteria , beauty tips , cell division , Current Biology , Dermatology , Eternal Life , Eternal Youth , genetic engineering , how to stay looking young , Japan , Looking Young , massey university , National Institute of Genetics , New Zealand , rDNA , ribosomal DNA , skin care , Takehiko Kobayashi , yeast        

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Anti-Aging Secrets Discovered in Yeast Could be the Key to Eternal Youth

2013 International Green Building Conference Kicks Off in Singapore

September 11, 2013 by  
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This morning, delegates from more than 35 countries gathered at the Marina Bay Sands Expo and Convention Center in Singapore for the 2013 International Green Building Conference to exchange ideas about building greener communities in the face of climate change. The event, organized by Singapore’s Building and Construction Authority (BCA) in partnership with Reed Exhibitions and the Singapore Green Building Council, will be running concurrently with the 2013 World Engineers Summit Singapore and the Build Eco Xpo (BEX) Asia 2013 , giving architects, engineers and policy makers from all around the world a chance to collaborate and brainstorm solutions to real-world sustainability issues. Read the rest of 2013 International Green Building Conference Kicks Off in Singapore Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2013 International Green Building Conference , asia green buildings , BEX Asia , Build Eco Expo Asia , eco design , Green Building , green building Asia , green design , green mark , International Green Building Conference , marina bay sands , Singapore , singapore bca , singapore green , singapore green architecture , singapore green buildings , sustainable design , Teo Chee Hean        

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2013 International Green Building Conference Kicks Off in Singapore

MAD Architects Unveil Mountainous Skyscrapers for Beijing’s Chaoyang Park

September 11, 2013 by  
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Ma Yansong of MAD Architects wants to create a unique Chinese architecture that embraces contemporary design while still pulling from the country’s traditional roots. To that end, he’s unveiled plans for a mixed-use complex of skyscrapers, office blocks and public spaces for Beijing’s Chaoyang Park that emulate mountains , hills and lakes! The development follows Ma Yansong’s Shan-Shui city concept, in which buildings and cities are influenced by nature and emotion to enable urban dwellers to connect with nature through the built environment. Read the rest of MAD Architects Unveil Mountainous Skyscrapers for Beijing’s Chaoyang Park Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: buildings that look like mountains , buildings that look like natural landscape , chaoyang park , Chinese architecture , futuristic city landscape painting , ma yansong , MAD architects , shan-shui , simulating nature with buildings , spirit of green        

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MAD Architects Unveil Mountainous Skyscrapers for Beijing’s Chaoyang Park

7 DIY Face Masks for Gorgeous Spring and Summer Skin

May 3, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of 7 DIY Face Masks for Gorgeous Spring and Summer Skin Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: avocado , beauty products , cucumber , DIY , eczema , face care , face mask , honey , organic beauty , rosacea , Skin , skin care , yogurt        

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7 DIY Face Masks for Gorgeous Spring and Summer Skin

Chemicals from Personal Care Products Are Polluting Chicago’s Air

May 3, 2013 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock When the gales blow across the Windy City, residents may have more to worry about than mussed hair. According to a new study led by Keri Hornbuckle from the University of Iowa , chemicals found in a myriad of personal care products are polluting Chicago’s air. Known as cyclic siloxanes, these compounds have been found to be toxic in aquatic life as well as posing a possible threat to other organisms. The airborne chemicals in downtown Chicago were recorded at levels ten times higher than in West Branch Iowa, and four times higher than in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. No studies have been completed yet to determine whether or not breathing the substances is harmful to humans, but their concentrations might be cause for concern. Read the rest of Chemicals from Personal Care Products Are Polluting Chicago’s Air Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: air pollution , California , canada , Cedar Rapids , chicago , cyclic siloxanes , d4 , d5 , England , Food Chain , great lakes , keri hornbuckle , norway , personal care products , toxic , university of iowa , US EPA , water issues , west branch        

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Skin MD Natural Face, Hand and Body Shielding Lotion

February 18, 2010 by  
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If you’ve read any of my posts about skin care products before you probably know I have issues with overly sensitive skin. Minor use of one tiny bit of the wrong thing makes me break out in all kinds of badness which could be anything from acne to hives

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Skin MD Natural Face, Hand and Body Shielding Lotion

Get Your Green Beauty Samples

February 10, 2010 by  
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Most people, when starting out with green beauty products, have no idea where to begin.  Which products should I purchase first?  Which will my skin like?  And which are truly safe products, for that matter? There are several online retailers who help with these decisions and get your new green beauty regimen off to a great start.  Simply, easily, and without spening a lot of money.  These are also worth a look if you already have a green beauty routine in place and would like to try a few different products.  It is always fun to sample new stuff! Read more of this story »

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What is Your Skin’s Temperament Type?

January 29, 2010 by  
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We know that what we eat (or don’t eat), whether or not we are getting an adequate amount of sleep, how much water we are drinking and stress all contribute to the health and good looks of our skin.  But what about temperament?  Each of us has a personality that has grown and developed over the course of our lives, but temperament is something we are born with.  It just goes to figure that it would have a pretty big influence on our lives. Which temperament are you? Read more of this story »

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