Weathering steel wraps around a solar-powered California home

October 31, 2017 by  
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When Faulkner Architects was tasked with building a family home just outside San Francisco, the clients emphasized the importance of the environment. The Truckee-based architecture firm set about creating a striking site-specific dwelling with a small energy footprint. The result is an AIA award-winning three-bedroom home, called Miner Road, that’s wrapped in sheets of Corten Steel—chosen for its low maintenance and the way it “refresh[es] every time it rains, just like the landscape,” says architect Greg Faulkner. Located in Orinda on a sloped eight-acre site with large oak trees, Miner Road takes over the footprint of a former home that once stood on the property. The mature oak trees informed the orientation of the home and provide shade, while glass walls frame the trees’ large gnarled branches. Large cutouts in the weathering steel facade let in ample natural light and views of the landscape. Related: Green-roofed home with rusting walls appears to grow out of a Finnish forest “This bridging between interior and exterior is major feature of the main living space, and an entire wall is devoted to connecting the two visually,” wrote Faulkner Architects. In contrast to the weathering steel facade, the interior is bright and modern, and focuses on a natural materials palette , from the abundant use of white oak to white gypsum walls and basalt floor tiles. The home’s mechanical and electrical systems are designed at a 44.9% improvement over code and include a rainwater harvesting system and solar panels. + Faulkner Architects Via Dezeen

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Weathering steel wraps around a solar-powered California home

Wind-powered machine mimics the sound of 500 galloping horses

September 11, 2017 by  
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How do you bring an ancient landscape to life? Architecture studio NEON breathes life into England’s historical Chesters Roman Fort by recreating the sound of 500 galloping horses. Architect Mark Nixon led the design of Cavalary 360, a wind-powered installation that mimics the sounds of horse hooves clopping on the ground while framing the North Tyne landscape. The site-specific musical instrument pays homage to the 500 horses that belonged to the Roman cavalrymen that roamed the land 1,600 years ago. Calvary 360 was created as part of Hadrian’s Calvary, an exhibition that celebrates the Roman cavalry with unique installations installed along Hadrian’s Wall . “It can be difficult to make a connection between the preserved walls of the Roman cavalry fort (the most extensive in Britain) and the powerful mounted troops based here,” wrote NEON. “Cavalry 360° is a vast site specific musical instrument which uses the force of the wind to create the sound of the cavalry moving across the landscape beyond. The piece creates an equine soundscape as a means of evoking the imagination of the viewer to fill in the gaps.” Related: Mobile residence for writers to meander the border of England’s former Roman Empire The massive musical instrument is a circular structure made up of 32 wind turbines elevated on tall black frames. Each wind turbine is connected to 15 beaters, each of which represents a single horse in the cavalry. The frame units are visually paired to represent the 30 horses in a turma, the term for a cavalry unit in the Roman Roman army. The cups at the end of the three turbine arms catch the wind, which powers and rotates the insulation that changes sound depending on the direction and speed of the wind. Visitors are encouraged to stand in the middle of Cavalary 360 to experience the full effect and look out to views of the fort and landscape through the black frames. + NEON Via Dezeen Images by Lightly Frozen

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Wind-powered machine mimics the sound of 500 galloping horses

Alex Chinnecks mesmerizing crack on a brick building turns heads in London

August 1, 2017 by  
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From a melting house to a floating building, British artist Alex Chinneck has a knack for turning heads—and his latest work is no exception. For his first permanent artwork, Chinneck created an enormous crack down the side of the building in an optical illusion called “Six pins and half a dozen needles.” Created with a group of engineers, steelworkers, and brick-makers, this monumental artwork at Assembly London is officially unveiled to the public today, August 1. Commissioned by AXA Investment Managers – Real Assets , the surrealist Six pins and half a dozen needles artwork is located at Assembly London , a major mixed-use campus on a site that previously housed publishing facilities. Chinneck references the publishing industry in his design, which resembles a torn sheet of paper. “The work was conceived to engage people in a fun and uplifting way,” said Chinneck. “Although we use real brick , it was designed with a cartoon-like quality to give the sculpture an endearing artifice and playful personality. I set out to create accessible artworks and I sincerely hope this becomes a popular landmark for London and positive experience for Londoners. Following 14-months of development, this represents my studio’s first permanent project and we are excited to be working on more. Forthcoming artworks include a trail of four sculptures with a combined height of 163-metres that will be constructed from over 100,000 bricks.” Related: Alex Chinneck Builds a Wax House in London Just to Watch it Melt Six pins and half a dozen needles is constructed from 4,000 bricks and over 1,000 stainless steel components. A crane was used to carefully position the artwork in place at 20 meters above ground level. The installation leans against a concrete facade and weighs approximately ten-tonnes. + Alex Chinneck Images by Charles Emerson

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Alex Chinnecks mesmerizing crack on a brick building turns heads in London

Zero-energy timber and steel home is buried into a natural dune

December 27, 2016 by  
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VVKH architecten designed Villa Meijendel in Doornweg, the Netherlands to a client’s custom specifications – but they also had a big helping hand from nature. Clad in timber charred Shou Sugi Ban timber, Villa Meijendel is a site-specific home that is half-buried in a high dune and largely sculpted by the forest landscape. Solar panels, heat pumps, and the high thermal mass of the building’s concrete structure helps the home produce as much energy as it consumes. The Villa Meijendel comprises three levels, two of which are partially built into the dune . The ground level contains a garage and technical room. The building’s unusual form was dictated by local regulations that only allowed a small and compact building volume on the relatively narrow lot located on the edge of the Meijendel nature reserve . The first level of the home includes two bedrooms, a master bedroom, wellness room, entrance, and office, while the topmost level includes a large living room and kitchen. Related: Prefab Dutch ‘Shou Sugi Ban’ House Features a Low-Maintenance Charred Timber Facade The home is modern and minimalist with unpolished concrete, steel, charred wood , unfinished wood, and anodized aluminum. Split levels in the house create a variety of views inside the home and out towards the landscapes through the large expanses of glazing. “Every detail, such as the door handle or stairs, is precisely thought through and designed,” write the architects. “Villa Meijendel is a fascinating artefact, a sort of wooden forest hut fully integrated in the landscape and with a strong connection between the interior spaces and immediate surroundings. Trees, light and dunes have sculpted this remarkable house.” + VVKH architecten Via ArchDaily Images via VVKH architecten

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Zero-energy timber and steel home is buried into a natural dune

Giant squid brings the mysticism of the sea to a Portuguese island

November 3, 2016 by  
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Created for the sixth annual public arts festival of the Azores , the character of Vernie was inspired by the vibrant sea life in the Atlantic Ocean. Moradavaga writes: “Influenced by the stunning landscapes and the mystic aura related to all that concerns whale hunting (in the past) and observation (in the present) our mind wandered through old tales like Moby Dick, by Herman Melville, and 20.000 Leagues Under the Sea, by Jules Verne, and the presence of sperm-whales along the Azores coasts led us to devise a character, “Vernie” the giant squid, that came from the depths of the ocean to serve as a communicative playful tool for passersby of all ages at Portas do Mar in the city of Ponta Delgada.” Related: VIDEO: Watch giant squid flash different colors to communicate Made with long red tubes, Vernie the giant squid sprawls out across a green park with a length of 15.55 meters. The mantle with the head measures 1.9 meters in height and features two empty “eye-holes” large enough for visitors to stick their head through. The tentacles are extended in different directions and wrap around nearby objects, from a wire sculpture to trees. The site-specific sculpture was installed in July 2016. + Moradavaga Via ArchDaily Images via Moradavaga

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Giant squid brings the mysticism of the sea to a Portuguese island

Olafur Eliasson’s Sprawling Stone River Landscape Takes Over the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

August 19, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Olafur Eliasson’s Sprawling Stone River Landscape Takes Over the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , Louisiana moma , Louisiana Museum of Modern Art , Model Room , Olafur Eliasson , Olafur Eliasson first solo exhibition , Olafur Eliasson Riverbed , Riverbed , sensory art , site specific installation , site-specific

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Olafur Eliasson’s Sprawling Stone River Landscape Takes Over the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

Leaked Video Shows “Most Abhorrent Displays of Unethical Hunting Behavior and Animal Abuse Ever Recorded”

August 19, 2014 by  
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Hunting protected animals with semi-automatic weapons, running over animals with jeeps, and torturing animals before killing them; it sounds too horrible to be true – but a shocking new video shows that a company called Green Mile Safari allowed its clients to do all of the above. The terrible montage of animal abuse is so bad that the Dallas Safari Club sent a letter to Tanzania’s minister of natural resources and tourism stating that “without question, the video depicts some of the most abhorrent displays of unethical hunting behavior and animal abuse ever recorded.” Read the rest of Leaked Video Shows “Most Abhorrent Displays of Unethical Hunting Behavior and Animal Abuse Ever Recorded” Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: abuse , animal , green , hunt , hunting , mile , tanzania , torture , Video

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Leaked Video Shows “Most Abhorrent Displays of Unethical Hunting Behavior and Animal Abuse Ever Recorded”

British Artist Laura Bacon Weaves Willow Branches Into Powerful Sculptures

May 8, 2013 by  
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British Artist Laura Bacon Weaves Willow Branches Into Powerful Sculptures

Tadashi Kawamata Covers Versailles in a Surreal Cascade of 5,000 Recycled Wooden Crates

February 14, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Tadashi Kawamata Covers Versailles in a Surreal Cascade of 5,000 Recycled Wooden Crates Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , crates cascade , Gandamaison , instalation , Recycled Materials , recycled wooden crates , site-specific , Tadashi Kawamata , Versailles

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Tadashi Kawamata Covers Versailles in a Surreal Cascade of 5,000 Recycled Wooden Crates

Modular Mazda Shipping Container Car Dealership To Be Built in Phases

May 23, 2012 by  
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