These colorful glamping pods are tucked into a South Korean mountain range

July 3, 2018 by  
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South Korean firm  Atelier Chang has installed a series of colorful glamping pods in a remote South Korean mountain range. Tucked deep into a green cypress forest, the contemporary pods that make up the SJCC Glamping Resort are designed for travelers who want to enjoy exploring Suncheon Ecological Bay, a beautiful coastal area 300 kilometers south of Seoul. The 16 glamping pods were built with steel frames and covered with brightly-colored fabric in shades of fuchsia, bright green and powder blue. The fabric is durable enough to insulate the structures year-round, even in wintertime. The area is known for its bitter winters, but the coverings, as well as the rounded shapes of the pods, help resist strong winds and snow loading. Related: Alterra beach resort uses shipping containers for private glamping cabins According to the architects, each of the colorful pods was strategically orientated to provide stunning views of the forest and the sea in the distance. “We wanted guests to feel as if they are living deep in the forest – directly in touch with the natural environment rather than being disconnected from it, as is the case with many ‘destination’ resorts,” said Soohyun Chang, founder of Atelier Chang. On the interior, guests can enjoy a rather large glamping layout of approximately 164 square feet. The pods feature an open-plan living area with a kitchen and bathroom. Each pod has two comfortable beds. To minimize the resort’s impact on the natural landscape, each pod has a wooden deck, which is raised off the ground by multiple piles. When not enjoying peaceful hikes around the property, guests can make their way to the clubhouse and restaurant. The bright white building, which sits at the center of the resort, was made using the same steel and fabric construction techniques. Its zig-zagged facade opens up into a large deck that looks out over the forest. + Atelier Chang Via Dezeen Images via Atelier Chang

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These colorful glamping pods are tucked into a South Korean mountain range

Mirrored art complex in Bangkok seamlessly co-exists with the surrounding trees

June 21, 2018 by  
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A reflective facade and calculated layout blends Bangkok’s new Naiipa Art Complex into the environment. Designed by Bangkok-based Stu/D/O Architects , the mixed-use building carefully wraps around the existing trees on the property while using its mirrored cladding to camouflage the structure into the lush green backdrop. The Naiipa complex (which means “deep in the forest”) is a 25,000-square-foot building that includes an art gallery, music studio, dance studio and office space, along with restaurants and coffee shops. According to the architects, the plan was to provide a community-focused center that wouldn’t disturb the existing greenery . Stu/D/O said, “The project is named after the concept of concealing the architecture in the forest as the vision of greenery is expanded by using reflective glass all around.” Related: Gorgeous mirrored facade extension allows brick Belgian notary to blend into the landscape To create a subtle volume for the large building and its multiple uses, the design was divided into two main sections separated by a tree-filled courtyard. Building A is an elongated structure that was carefully built around an existing pink trumpet tree to protect its growth. The second building is a cube-like four-story structure. A winding multilevel walkway that connects the two buildings intertwines around the existing trees , giving visitors a chance to truly connect with nature. To disguise the complex within its surroundings, the architects used three different types of glazing to create a mirrored effect : reflective, translucent and transparent. According to the firm, the multiple glazed walls, along with the “rhythmic folding pattern” of the facade, helped accomplish the goal. The east side of the building uses a translucent double facade that helps filter direct sunlight and reduce heat on the interior. As visitors follow this facade to the entrance, the building begins to “fold,” creating a narrow entrance reminiscent of a vibrant forest. Inside, the sun’s rays are reflected off the exterior facade , creating displays of shadow and light throughout the day, again imitating a forest canopy. The structure welcomes visitors with a floating “Bird Nest” gallery that is clad in reflective glass and appears to be surrounded by trees, creating a true feeling of ‘Naiipa.’ + Stu/D/O Architects Via Archdaily Images via Stu/D/O Architects

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Mirrored art complex in Bangkok seamlessly co-exists with the surrounding trees

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