Mieluisa’s Bilberry Pads are an accessible way to bring the forest to the city

October 4, 2017 by  
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These modular planters bring a taste of the forest to the city. Finnish design collective Mieluisa designed the Bilberry Pad as a way for people without access to nature to grow bilberries, lingonberries, crowberries, different ferns, mosses, bunch grass and spruce wherever they are. They are meant to replicate the experience of a real forest, with birds, ants and long-legged spiders bustling around the plants— like they do in nature. Fresh heath forest floor is transplanted into these movable planter modules that are easy to move and to combine. They are also designed to be accessible, so people can pick berries while sitting or even lying in bed. Related: The Ienami Bonkei Planter is a Green-Roofed Cityscape for Your Desk Ease of access was the motive behind the first version of The Bilberry Pad in Kangasala, Finland , where Mieluisa organized a berry-picking event for residents of the Maijala Service Center. The project was financed by Kone Foundation and The Finnish Cultural Foundation, with support by Messupuu and Piiraisen Viherpalvelu who provided the Siberian larch for the containers and the bilberry heath transplant. + Mieluisa

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Mieluisa’s Bilberry Pads are an accessible way to bring the forest to the city

Black mountain cabin lights up like a lantern at night

April 18, 2017 by  
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Architect Tomislav Soldo designed a handsome mountain cabin that owes its existence to a fortuitously placed walnut tree. Set on a sloped site in the Croatian mountains, the 100-square-meter home was designed and built as an afterthought following the completion of a terrace beneath the shade of a walnut tree. Clad in Siberian larch painted black, the modern building features a ventilated facade and large windows that allow it to glow like a lantern at night. Located in Ogulin, the two-story compact cabin echoes the local vernacular with its use of timber and simple pitched roof . Two layers of black wood tar were painted onto the facade to protect the building from the elements and to minimize maintenance. The 30-centimeter-thick walls were constructed from aerated concrete blocks, saving the architects from adding extra thermal insulation and allowing for speedy construction. Thermal efficiency is improved with the installation of a ventilated facade made from Siberian larch cladding. Related: Salvaged wood clads handsome mountain cabin in Vermont In contrast to the dark facade, the interior features white-painted walls, light-toned timber floors, and black accents such as the wood-burning stove and window trim. The use of a light color palette, high ceilings, and large windows that overlook the mountains and forests give the home a spacious feel despite the small footprint. An open-plan kitchen, living, and dining room are located on the ground floor. The bedroom is placed on the mezzanine level and overlooks the living room below. + Tomislav Soldo Via ArchDaily Images by Jure Živkovi?

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Black mountain cabin lights up like a lantern at night

Amazing New Photos from Inside a Mysterious Siberian Crater

November 18, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Amazing New Photos from Inside a Mysterious Siberian Crater Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: gas explosions , mysterious hole , russia , Russian Centre of Arctic Exploration , Siberian crater , Siberian crater from inside , Siberian Times , Vladimir Pushkarev , Yamal crater

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Amazing New Photos from Inside a Mysterious Siberian Crater

The tipping point in action: twice as much methane released due to seabed permafrost melting

November 26, 2013 by  
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This photo shows methane on fire as it escapes through the ice above a Siberian Arctic shelf. How does this natural gas affect global warming predictions?

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The tipping point in action: twice as much methane released due to seabed permafrost melting

Now this is what you call a narrow house

November 26, 2013 by  
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Here’s the skinny on a house designed by Fujiwarramuro Architects that’s barely wide enough to swing a cat.

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Now this is what you call a narrow house

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