Owls will no longer be exploited for Muggle entertainment

March 15, 2021 by  
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Owls will no longer be forced into show biz in live Harry Potter productions. Thanks to Warner Bros. listening to Tylor Starr, president and co-founder of The Protego Foundation, owls can get back to hunting and leave wizarding to the humans. “We learn in the Harry Potter series that owls are sensitive and remarkably intelligent birds who should be treated with kindness and respect,” Starr said. “They shouldn’t be subjected to loud music, large crowds, and flashing lights.” Related: Harry Potter fans succeed in push for fair trade chocolate treats “The Wizarding World of Harry Potter” is a show performed at Universal Parks & Resorts locations. In 2014, when the show debuted in Osaka, Japan, owls were featured in the opening ceremonies. The park also tied live owls to a pedestal so people could pose for photos with them. But no more. “The Protego Foundation is thankful to Warner Bros. and the Harry Potter Global Franchise Development team for honoring Hedwig, Errol, and other beloved owls,” Starr added. Hedwig and Errol are two of the many owls who provide postal services for people in the seven-book series. As The Protego Foundation explains on its website, it “fights to end the abuse of the animals in the Muggle world through our inspiration from the magical creatures in the wizarding world.” Its goal is, “A wizarding fandom that is more considerate of the rights, feelings, and treatment of all creatures regardless of species , size, or magical ability.” The group of activists started as The Fwooper Foundation in 2015. A couple of name changes later, members are still encouraging the public to avoid eating animals, wearing animals skins or patronizing live animal acts. Unlike some animal rights groups, Protego puts a friendly, positive spin on its activism. As a thank you to Warner Bros., the foundation is sending the company an enormous box of owl-shaped vegan chocolate. Vegan actress Evanna Lynch, who played Luna Lovegood in the Harry Potter series, was also jubilant, sharing her praise on Instagram. + Protego Foundation Via VegNews Image via Christel Sagniez

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GM’s electric delivery foray, plus other mobility trends headlining CES

January 13, 2021 by  
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GM’s electric delivery foray, plus other mobility trends headlining CES Katie Fehrenbacher Wed, 01/13/2021 – 01:30 For the first time in its 54-year history, the world’s largest tech show — the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) — kicked off this week as an all-virtual event, cramming a week of keynotes, press conferences and over 1,000 exhibitor booths onto the screens of our laptops and from the comfort of our homes.  As a recovering tech reporter, who for years traversed the football field-sized ballrooms in Las Vegas to check out the latest and weirdest gadgets, I, for one, am glad not to be stuck in the scene of long taxi lines, awkward parties and rampant consumerism.  But virtual or not, CES continues to highlight what some of the biggest tech and retail companies in the world are prioritizing and building. And in recent years it has emerged as a place for automotive and mobility companies to make announcements, launch products and get attention. 2021 was no different in that respect.  Here are five mobility tech themes from the show to keep an eye on this year: Electric delivery:  The biggest mobility newsmaker from the show was General Motors , whose CEO, Mary Barra, delivered an hour-long keynote (check out our list of 20 C-suite sustainability champions such as Barra). GM announced it’s launching a new business unit called BrightDrop that will seek to electrify the goods delivery market. GM showed off images of an electric delivery vehicle called the EV600, as well as a pallet system called the EP1. FedEx Express announced it will be the first customer of BrightDrop. It will be the first company to receive the EV600s, which will have a 250-mile range, can carry 200 pounds of payload and will have 23 cubic feet of cargo space. GM’s logistics news comes amidst a massive growth in e-commerce during the pandemic. A couple of months ago, Ford, too, announced it plans to launch an electric delivery vehicle called the e-Transit, based on its popular Transit commercial vehicle.  GM is making a huge $27 billion push to electrify its product lines. GM also showed off a new electric Cadillac luxury vehicle and more details about its next-gen battery technology.  Of course, GM wasn’t the only automotive player that emphasized the electric transition at CES. Panasonic touted a new battery containing less than 5 percent cobalt that it’s working on, while LG and auto parts maker Magna provided more details of their joint venture to sell electric vehicle power trains. Mercedes-Benz showed off a sleek curved vehicle screen that will debut in one of its luxury electric vehicles.  The state of autonomous:  Due to the ever-present hype cycle and over-ambitious promises, autonomous vehicles have under-delivered on expectations. But make no mistake, they’re just around the corner. The CEO of Mobileye (owned by Intel), Amnon Shashua, did a long-ranging interview about the state of AVs, predicting robotaxis will be the first commercial application for true AVs, followed by consumer vehicles in 2025.  The commercial sector is already tapping into autonomous tech for business. Caterpillar highlighted at CES how it’s using autonomous vehicles in its mining vehicles on a mining site to save customers’ money and time.  Decarbonizing systems:  Sustainability doesn’t necessarily go hand-in-hand with a huge convention hawking the latest ephemeral gadgets. But auto parts company Bosch used the digital CES to tout that the company has gone carbon-neutral this year, and now plans to go carbon-neutral across its supply chain, a particularly more difficult task. GM, likewise, emphasized the climate aspect of its electrification commitments. Data-driven user experience design: CES has long been the place for companies to emphasize their design and data-driven work on consumer experience and personalized experiences, whether that’s in-vehicle systems, gaming headsets or mobile screens. Of particular interest to Transport Weekly readers will be that a handful of companies such as Mercedes-Benz , Panasonic Automotive , mapping company HERE and Bosch also highlighted how data and design can be used to make the electric vehicle driving and charging experience better. 5G for connected cities:  The telcos always use CES to try to create buzz around their latest network investments. And a digital 2021 CES was no different. Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg delivered a keynote that listed a series of new applications and experiences that 5G could help deliver. One of the most interesting was increased connectivity in cities that could lead to things such as reduced traffic. Meanwhile, UPS and Verizon announced that the companies are collaborating on testing drone delivery using 5G to a retirement community in Florida.  Beyond mobility trends, CES touted two major things you’d expect in a pandemic. First, technologies that make being stuck in your home easier, more fun and more comfortable. Think bigger screens, home robots, faster WiFi. Second: tools that can protect your health, such as over-engineered connected masks and air purifiers.  Sign up for Katie Fehrenbacher’s newsletter, Transport Weekly, at this link . Follow her on Twitter. Topics Transportation & Mobility Electric Vehicles Autonomous Vehicles Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off General Motors has created a new commercial business unit, called BrightDrop, with new electric vehicles to help businesses deliver goods efficiently. Courtesy of General Motors Close Authorship

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House passes Big Cat Public Safety Act

December 9, 2020 by  
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The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a landmark legislation that will see big cats protected from human mistreatment. The Big Cat Public Safety Act (BCPSA) prohibits individuals from owning big cats in their homes or in roadside zoos. The act was passed by 272 votes, compared to 114 members who voted against the legislation. The bill, which was introduced by Michael Quigley and Brian Fitzpatrick in 2012, has been in the pipeline for a long time. Due to public outcry, the legislation has now been passed, prohibiting exploitation of big cats such as lions, leopards, and tigers . “After months of the public loudly and clearly calling for Congress to end private big cat ownership, I am extremely pleased that the House has now passed the Big Cat Public Safety Act,” Quigley said. “Big cats are wild animals that simply do not belong in private homes, backyards, or shoddy roadside zoos.” Related: ‘Tiger King’ drama overshadows abuse of captive tigers in U.S. The success in passing this legislation in the House has been attributed to the exposure of animal exploitation on the Netflix series “Tiger King.” Following the show’s popularity, in April 2020, The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) released footage showing the abuse that tigers and other big cats suffer at the hands of Joe Exotic, one of the leading personalities in “Tiger King.” The footage of Joe Exotic and other zoo workers routinely abusing big cats lead to public outrage, which resulted in varying levels of discipline for several people featured in the show. Joe Exotic himself is currently in prison for wildlife violations. The case of Joe Exotic’s mistreatment of wildlife is but one among many. Due to such incidences, multiple states have been implementing rules to control human-wildlife interactions. Currently, only five states, Nevada, Alabama, Oklahoma, North Carolina, and Wisconsin, have no laws protecting big cats. As such, it has become necessary to have a federally recognized law to protect these animals. Keeping big cats in roadside zoos and homes also poses a public health threat. Since 1990, over 400 dangerous incidences, including 24 deaths, have been reported in 46 states and Washington, D.C. According to HSUS CEO Kitty Block and Sara Admunsen, president of the Humane Society Legislative Fund, the only way to end these incidences is by introducing federal legislation. “But to wipe this problem out for good, we need strong federal laws that will prevent unscrupulous people from forcing wild animals to spend their entire lives in abject misery while creating a public safety nightmare,” they said in a joint statement.  The Big Cat Public Safety Act now moves to the Senate floor for voting. Via VegNews Image via Sherri Burgan

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Outdoor adventures in Hot Springs, Arkansas

December 9, 2020 by  
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If you look at an aerial view of Hot Springs, Arkansas , you see a few rows of buildings squeezed in between wild, green mountains. This resort town, about an hour southwest of Little Rock, is an unusual place where you can walk out the door of your downtown hotel and within minutes be shopping at boutiques, taking the waters in a historic bathhouse or hiking a national park trail. I visited in October, as COVID-19 ramped up nationwide and everybody seemed to be seeking outdoor activities. I found plenty in Hot Springs. Outdoors fun in Hot Springs Hot Springs National Park encompasses both the cultural assets of Bathhouse Row and the natural resources, such as many miles of trails in the Ouachita Mountains. Because bathhouses aren’t as popular as they were in 1900, the park has to think of new strategies to maintain its rank as the 18th most-visited U.S. national park . “It’s a lot of work to keep the park relevant to the American public,” said park ranger Ashley Waymouth. She’s preparing programming for 2021, the park’s centennial. Some of the plans revolve around that magic number 100, such as rallying people to donate 100 hours of volunteer work to the park in 2021 or walk/bike/paddle 100 miles in Arkansas. There will even be a special ‘bark ranger’ event for dogs. Related: This modern art museum was once a cheese factory in Arkansas Early Hot Springs medical practitioners prescribed walks of various distances and altitude gains as part of their patients’ health regimens. Today within the national park, the Hot Springs and North Mountain Trails and the West Mountain Trails offer hiking options ranging from short, scenic loops to the 10-mile Sunset Trail. Many of the trails are interconnected. A short walk from downtown, the Peak Trail leads you to the Hot Springs Mountain Tower. You can take an elevator or walk 300-plus steps up the 216-foot tower to get a panoramic view of the surrounding forest. Once you reach the open-air observation deck, you’re 1,256 feet above sea level and can admire 140 square miles of park and mountain views. For a more cultivated outdoors experience, venture about 8 miles from town to Garvan Woodland Gardens . Now run by the University of Arkansas’ Fay Jones School of Architecture + Design, the garden started out as the personal project of philanthropist and lumber heiress Verna Cook Garvan. Now, visitors wander 5 miles of paved pathways through an ever-changing landscape, be it an explosion of daffodils in spring or fall color in October. The garden also attracts architecture buffs, especially to see the spectacular Anthony Chapel, a light-filled structure of glass, wood and stone. In 2018, a gorgeous and innovative treehouse opened within the Evans Children’s Adventure Garden, delighting adult visitors as well. Hot Springs is also a mountain biking destination. The Northwoods Trail System has 26 miles of single-track, multi-track and other types of trails, plus a bike skills park, to keep beginning to advanced riders entertained for days. Northwoods hosts the annual Gudrun MTB Festival each November. Trail runners and hikers can also use this trail system. Wellness The city of 37,000 was founded on wellness, and you’ll still find options along those lines. Some visitors expect natural hot springs like you find in the west. But Hot Springs’ water is protected. Springs are covered, and their flow is directed. You can still experience the water at two of Hot Springs’ historic bathhouses. The Buckstaff is a bit more old-school, while the Quapaw operates more like a modern spa. When I visited in October , public bathing was still happening despite COVID-19. Bathers were asked to social distance in the Quapaw’s multiple pools of varying temperatures. The water felt good, but not as relaxing as it would’ve been in pre-pandemic times. Hot Springs has several yoga studios, including Om Lounge Yoga and The Yoga Place . For the safest options during the pandemic, check out Garvan’s schedule of outdoor classes, such as yoga and tai chi in the garden. Dining out During my October visit, I found a couple of places for excellent vegan food. The best meal I had was lunch at the Superior Bathhouse : hot, salty, blistered shishito peppers followed by a Vietnamese-inspired veggie and noodle bowl. The tofu was so good, I suspected it was from an obscure Arkansas soy artisan, but it turned out to be the magic of the Superior’s chef. For breakfast or a caffeine fix, Kollective Coffee + Tea is the place to go. Owner Kevin Rogers’ family has long been into coffee, including a Christmas tradition of sending each other unusual coffees . “We’d try to one-up each other every year,” he said. Rogers was surprised when he found the best cup of coffee close to home. Onyx Coffee Lab , an award-winning roaster in Northwest Arkansas, supplies Kollective with its coffees. I had to agree it was one of the best soy cappuccinos I ever had. Kollective draws local and visiting vegans from around the country. “It’s pretty significant for us based on how rare it is in town,” Rogers said of the demand for the restaurant’s vegan dishes. In addition to a changing assortment of vegan pastries and mini cheesecakes, Kollective offers a couple of plant-based full breakfasts, including vegan frijoles rancheros. SQZBX is open for takeaway during the pandemic. This pizzeria offers vegan cheese, which is not exactly widely available in Arkansas. Where to stay I stayed at The Waters, which afforded a lively view of Hot Springs’ main drag. George Mann, best known for designing the Arkansas State Capitol, was the building’s main architect. It was called the Thompson Building when it was built in 1913 and originally housed doctors’ offices catering to visitors taking the healing waters. After a huge renovation in 2017, The Waters offers perfectly modern and spacious hotel rooms. But my favorite part was the lovingly restored tile work in the hallways. A popular rooftop bar provides beautiful views of Bathhouse Row and the mountains beyond. Hotel Hale , which just opened in 2019, is a boutique hotel inside a restored bathhouse. The owners incorporated exposed brick walls, original pine floors and arched windows into plush and comfortable rooms. If I ever visit again, I’d love to stay here. But I’d probably never leave the bathroom; the Hale pipes in hot spring water so you can take the waters in your own private bathtub. Images via Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: Like the author, we recommend taking the utmost care to keep those around you safe if you choose to travel. You can find more advice on travel precautions from the  CDC  and  WHO .

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Modernist Bata shoe factory transforms into geothermal-powered homes

December 9, 2020 by  
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Toronto-based design firm Quadrangle has fulfilled a long-held dream of the late Sonja Bata of Bata Shoes fame with the transformation of the decommissioned Bata Shoe Factory in Batawa. Designed in collaboration with Dubbeldam Architecture + Design , the adaptive reuse project aims to reinvent the former factory town of Batawa — located 175 kilometers east of Toronto on the Trent River — into a new model of sustainable development. The former factory now houses 47 rental residential units of varying sizes along with a variety of commercial and community spaces.  The Bata Shoe Factory was built in the early 20th century when the Bata family immigrated from Czechoslovakia to Canada in 1939, bringing along their shoe empire and 120 workers to establish the company town of Batawa. Although the modernist-style factory had been decommissioned in 2000 and sold to a plastics factory, Sonja Bata repurchased the 1,500-acre site in 2008 as part of an ambitious masterplan to transform Batawa into a model of sustainable development.  Related: 100-year-old Buda Mill & Grain Co. has new life as a community gathering spot The converted Bata Shoe Factory, completed in 2019 after Bata’s death, is the first phase of her vision. The manufacturing facility now houses 47 rental residential units with 12-foot-high ceilings stacked above commercial amenities including a children’s daycare with an outdoor playground, an exhibition and community space, multipurpose rooms, educational incubators and a retail store and café on the ground floor. The building is topped with an accessible rooftop terrace . The architects reduced the project’s environmental footprint by preserving the original concrete structure to achieve savings of close to 80% of the original building’s embodied carbon. Geothermal energy powers all of the HVAC systems. Passive solar principles informed the placement of building openings. To soften the industrial feel of the building, the architects added wood cladding on the soffits and balcony walls. The Bata Shoe Factory building is also equipped with high-speed fiber internet service and is located in a walkable, bike-friendly area. + Quadrangle Photography by Scott Norsworthy via Quadrangle

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The world is on fire. What can pine cones teach us about how to respond?

November 9, 2020 by  
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The world is on fire. What can pine cones teach us about how to respond? GreenBiz Vice President and VERGE Executive Director, Shana Rappaport, welcomes participants to VERGE 20 with a clean economy call to action and a surprise musical performance.This World is on Fire” was written by Kiki Lipsett, with additional lyrics customized by Shana Rappaport for VERGE 20 (original song, “This Girl is on Fire,” by Alicia Keys). You can learn more about and connect with all the musical collaborators via their websites: Kiki Lipsett (songwriter, piano:  kikilipsett.com ), Liliana Urbain (drums:  lilianaurbain.com ), Jules Indelicato (sound producer:  facebook.com/soundbyjules ), and Shana Rappaport (lead singer,  theseastars.org ). This session was held at GreenBiz Group’s VERGE 20, October 26-30, 2020. Learn more about the event here:  https://events.greenbiz.com/events/ve…   Watch our other must-see talks here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwW3…   OUR LINKS Website: https://www.greenbiz.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/greenbiz LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/gree… Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/greenbiz_group Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GreenBiz SHOW LESS YanniGuo Mon, 11/09/2020 – 15:51 Featured Off

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Music festivals and events can set the stage for sustainability

March 29, 2019 by  
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When it comes to entertainment , fans contemplate who they will pay to see in concert, what they will wear to the event and who they will invite to accompany them. But when masses of people gather, there is always potential for high volumes of waste and environmental damage. With sustainability taking a front seat culturally these days, event organizers are starting to pay attention to ways they can provide eco-friendly concerts and festivals. From fans, to artists, to organizers, everyone plays an important part in helping to achieve the same sustainable goal. Artists can inspire change While organizers can take the initiative to implement changes at each venue, performers have an impressive influence when they choose to work sustainably. When an artist with a strong fan base takes a stand, he or she can cultivate huge change. Take Jack Johnson, for example — a major name in the music industry is also a name linked to sustainable practices. His recording studio in L.A. is also where his team packages and ships CDs. The entire operation is solar-powered for a small carbon footprint in an industry that generally uses copious amounts of energy. Johnson’s crew also fuels tour buses with biodiesel and sells sustainable concert merchandise. In 2014, Johnson began the All at Once movement, which requires venues to agree to certain contract terms in order for him to perform. While some artists request specific foods or beverages in a green room, Johnson’s demands include energy-efficient light bulbs, 100 percent recycling and the elimination of plastic . In a world where sustainable practices are increasingly dire, Johnson and many other artists are setting an example for venues and fans to follow. Venues should set an eco-friendly example Located in the outdoor mecca of Oregon along the beautiful Deschutes River, the Les Schwab Amphitheater decided to become part of the solution to concert-produced waste with its Take Note initiative. The initiative outlines that all vendors serving food or beverages must agree to use 100 percent compostable dishes, utensils and cups. In addition, there are no single-use plastic water bottles for sale on the campus. Instead, there are free water refill stations. This particular venue also sells reusable cups made from stainless steel or non-petroleum silicone. The cups can be brought into the venue for any event in the future, too. Members of an Oregon-based group called the Broomsmen , which is focused on promoting zero-waste events, monitor the refuse stations at the Les Schwab Amphitheater to ensure garbage, compostables and recyclables all end up in the correct bins. Instead of a sea of plastic at the concert’s end, the result is a 50 percent reduction in waste over the past three seasons. Related: 100% recyclable cardboard tents could solve the waste problem at music festivals Other venues across the country have implemented similar policies. The Santa Barbara Bowl is working toward a carbon-neutral venue and boasts a landscape of native and drought-tolerant plants. Since 2013, The Bowl has made huge changes to how it handles waste. It currently diverts 90 percent of waste from landfills and hopes to reach 99 percent. In addition to the reduce, reuse, recycle and compost philosophy, the Bowl uses low-energy lighting and produces electricity for the venue using solar panels. Venues such as the Les Schwab Amphitheater and the Santa Barbara Bowl are inspiring drastic changes for event spaces around the world. Fans need to support sustainable practices As a fan, there are numerous actions you can take to facilitate the green-entertainment initiative. First, consider your mode of travel to the event and opt for eco-friendly alternatives. Consider carpooling with friends, using uberPOOL or taking public transit for a smaller carbon footprint . If you are close enough, ride a bike or walk instead of hopping into a cab. When choosing events to attend, consider the venues. Choose venues working toward sustainability, and support their efforts. Food and drinks are a huge part of the concert and festival environment, so come prepared to enjoy these treats in an eco-friendly manner. Bring your own refillable water bottle or reusable cup. If you don’t have one, purchase one at the event. Not only does this offer you discounts for the life of the cup, but it also funds progress at the venue. Many vendors have reduced straw waste by offering them by request only, and you can help even more by bringing your own reusable straw to the show. Speaking of waste , do your part to properly sort garbage, compostables and recycling. With a combined effort from artists, venue organizers and fans, the age-old pleasure derived from musical events can be both memorable and sustainable. Enjoy the show! Images via Les Schwab Amphitheater and Brian Lauer

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These are our favorite beauty retailers from the Indie Beauty Expo

February 6, 2019 by  
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The beauty world can be a complicated place, especially if you’re looking to ditch products with intimidating lists of ingredients and make the switch toward eco-friendly makeup and skincare. The return of the Indie Beauty Expo brought hundreds of independent retailers from around the world to showcase their amazing, one-of-a-kind products in the heart of Los Angeles . This year, our team of editors attended the IBE in Los Angeles and scouted the best beauty products from independent retailers that don’t compromise quality ingredients for their carbon footprint . Here are some of our favorite brands from IBELA. Little Moon Essentials The body care by Little Moon Essentials is “made by the phases of the moon” in Colorado. We love to spray the energizing mist at our desks when the climate news becomes too much to bear, and we enjoy the fun scent names (like Tired Old Ass). Kind Lips We always keep lip balm on hand, and our current go-to is Kind Lips . Not only are these hydrating and kind to the planet; the company also donates 20 percent of profits go toward anti-bullying organizations. Love Sun Body This is the world’s first sunscreen made using 100 percent natural ingredients. It is, of course, reef-safe and effective in protecting your skin from sun damage. Lunette Menstrual cups can be intimidating, but Lunette offers soft cups that hold for 12 hours and do not leak. Bare Me We love Bare Me’s reusable, dry sheet masks in a nod to waterless beauty. Plus, the packaging and masks can be recycled thanks to TerraCycle . Dirt Don’t Hurt From charcoal tooth scrubs and gum cleansing oils to a charcoal-based bath powder designed to soothe and relax, Dirt Don’t Hurt caught our attention with its natural products. Nature Lab Tokyo If you’re looking to really volumize your hair, try the clean, vegan hair products by Nature Lab Tokyo . As a lab, it has an array of specific formulas to fit your needs. IGXO IGXO prides itself on PETA-certified vegan and cruelty-free cosmetics. Lipsticks are the star of the show, and we were highly impressed with their staying power and non-drying formulas. Lalicious Lalicious’ line of natural , cruelty-free body washes, scrubs and lotions are truly delightful. We instantly fell in love with the velour body melt, which made our skin softer than ever before. Pure Mana Hawaii With products plucked right from the owners’ beautiful farm in Hawaii , these serums and body oils will transport you straight to paradise. Speak We love Speak’s natural, vegan, cruelty-free skincare, especially the cream deodorant and the cleansing powder, which smells exactly like our morning oatmeal. KIND-LY These Australian-based natural deodorants are vegan and cruelty-free , and guarantee your pits will be free of aluminum, parabens, alcohol and other nasties. KIND-LY also offers an armpit detox for the transition to natural deodorants. Sway Sway offers natural deodorant, an armpit detox and skincare that is good for you and the planet. Founder Rebecca So just launched skincare at the event, and we are raving over everything: toners, moisturizers, serums and all. Atar Atar offers luxurious, cruelty-free and vegan hair care products made from natural ingredients. Our hair has never been softer. Hum Hum’s products promote beauty from within as they are meant to treat blemishes, acne, dry skin, hair and nails. The best part? All supplements are gluten-free, non-GMO and sustainably sourced. Lather From the bamboo lemongrass scrub to the hand therapy cream to the muscle ease, we loved Lather’s eco-friendly products approved by PETA and Leaping Bunny. Plus, Lather is a carbon-neutral business and uses green packaging. Herbal Dynamics Beauty This plant-based beauty brand embraces nature with every product. Try the refreshing rose water face toner, which applies like a mist, or the overnight recover mask, which will leave the fragile skin on your face softer than ever. PYT Beauty This is beauty without the BS (bad stuff) . We were pleasantly surprised with the intense pigmentation of this natural cosmetics brand — we highly recommend the highlighters and lip duos! Spinster Sisters Co Spinster Sisters offers pure ingredients and reusable and recyclable packaging: we’re talking glass jars and plant-based plastics. milk + honey We love milk + honey’s plant-based, organic skincare, especially the products in scent profile No. 16, which blends pink grapefruit, bergamot and cardamom. *hype We’re obsessing over *hype , a line of plant-based nail polishes in a wide variety of colors. Even after several days, our nails have minimal chipping. Olive + M Olive + M’s skincare products are made using an olive oil base and U.S.-sourced ingredients. Each product repairs and protects skin from sun exposure, air pollution and other common problems. Northlore We fell in love with Northlore , as all its products are completely eco-friendly, from packaging to ingredients and even shipping. The glacier salt soak is all the rave for its detoxing and skin nourishing properties. + Indie Beauty Expo Images via Inhabitat

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These are our favorite beauty retailers from the Indie Beauty Expo

Derelict building is wrapped in tin foil to protest lack of affordable housing in Warsaw

February 6, 2019 by  
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Polish-born artist Piotr Janowski has become well-known for turning buildings and even entire locomotives into shimmery  art installations by covering them in thin layers of tin foil. Now, the artist is back with Zabkowska 9, Take off —  a building in the heart of Warsaw that has been sitting empty and in decay for years. By wrapping the large townhouse in tin foil, the artist hopes to call attention to Warsaw’s lack of affordable housing, despite the city’s high number of empty buildings. Janowski’s latest canvas this time around is a derelict 1870 tenement building, which has survived two wold wars, located in Warsaw’s Praga-Pó?noc district. Over the years, the area has become known for its crime and drug scene, but is being rediscovered as of late. Comparing it to Brooklyn before gentrification, Janowski said he is seeking to bring attention to the building and its potential to help the city with its lack of affordable housing . Related: Artist wraps vintage steam locomotive in 39,000 square feet of aluminum foil The artist explained that he hopes this particular work will help the city prepare a future urban design that will benefit those in need while retaining the architectural history of the neighborhoods. “I believe that my aluminum installation will, for a moment, turn into a symbolic silver bridge, which will combine the dreams of the pre-war past and then the dramatic years of the city’s inhabitants during the occupation with the contemporary positive changes that are taking place so definitely in this fascinating Warsaw district,” Janowski said. “I think that this is an ideal and unique time to adapt one of the abandoned buildings for this project and symbolically make its destroyed beauty reborn.” Working with a local homeless man, Wies?aw Go??b, who lives in the building, the artist began the art installation by covering the facade in more than 600 square meters of tin foil. Using a lift, he often spent days on end painstakingly covering the building’s wooden, wood, metal and stone facade. With help from Wies?aw, his wife and about 15 young volunteers, he was able to finish the incredible art piece in about 10 days. + Piotr Janowski Images via Piotr Janowski

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Derelict building is wrapped in tin foil to protest lack of affordable housing in Warsaw

‘The Great British Bake Off’ is back this time, with a vegan week

August 27, 2018 by  
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The Great British Bake Off usually features an assortment of bread, dairy and meat products slathered in more butter and cream than imaginable. But this year, the British cooking competition will feature a special vegan week to help promote healthier, more sustainable eating in what producers feel is a move in the right direction. The show, which kicks off its ninth season on August 28, will bring 12 amateurs to the kitchen to see who can bake the best traditional meals and desserts . The contestants this year include a nuclear scientist, a banker, a product demonstrator, a prosthetic technician and a research scientist, just to name a few. Previous seasons have featured a weekly theme, including cake, bread and biscuit weeks. This season, however, will include a vegan week and a Danish week, neither of which has never been done before. “We wanted something different and something to represent what is happening in this country,” Paul Hollywood, one of the judges on the show, explained. A  recent survey suggests upward of 3.5 million people in the U.K. are now vegan. Hollywood and his new co-star Prue Leith added that they think fans will learn a lot about watching vegan week on the  The Great British Bake Off . In fact, both judges admitted they learned many fascinating things during the vegan week that could very well change people’s lives. Although the show is introducing new weeks and challenges, the judging process will remain the same — the judges won’t accept a dish that is “okay for vegan, it’s got to taste good, period,” Hollywood said. The Great British Bake Off was originally on the BBC before being bought by Channel 4, which has produced the show for the past two seasons. The goal of the series, according to Hollywood, is to encourage the audience to learn how to bake and enjoy the process of baking. Now, those at home will have an opportunity to learn how to bake delicious treats within vegan guidelines. To that end, The Great British Bake Off presents a mixture of challenges, so that viewers don’t feel too overwhelmed when they try the recipes out in their own kitchens. + The Great British Bake Off Via The Guardian Images via VeganBaking.net

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‘The Great British Bake Off’ is back this time, with a vegan week

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