Conventional shipping get on deck for decarbonization

May 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Conventional shipping get on deck for decarbonization

International shipping produces as much CO2 as aircraft. Here’s what we can do about that.

View original here:
Conventional shipping get on deck for decarbonization

Retractable solar sails to help power "world’s most eco-friendly cruise ship"

December 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Retractable solar sails to help power "world’s most eco-friendly cruise ship"

Peace Boat has been sailing the world since 1983, laboring to build a culture of peace through education. Now they have unveiled a new Ecoship , designed by Oliver Design , that could take to the seas in 2020. A closed-loop water system, whale-inspired hydrodynamic hull, and retractable solar sails are among the features that make this vessel, according to Oliver Design , the “world’s most eco-friendly cruise ship .” Cruise ships aren’t typically known for sustainability . The average ship generates around 80,000 liters of sewage every day, and with outdated filter systems, minimally-treated sewage is often dumped into the water. Japan-based Peace Boat set out to create an alternative: an energy efficient , nature-inspired vessel that obtains some power from 10 retractable wind generators and 10 retractable photovoltaic sails. Their goal is zero discharge and almost zero waste operations with a closed waste loop and closed water loop. Related: Norwegian billionaire funds world’s largest yacht to scoop up plastic Spain-based Oliver Design came up with plans for the 60,000 metric ton ocean liner that can fit 2,000 passengers. A plant kingdom aboard will span five decks, absorbing surplus water and capturing carbon dioxide, with organic onboard waste serving as compost. Vertical farms will produce vegetables for voyagers to eat. The Ecoship should see an around 40 percent carbon dioxide reduction compared with a typical cruise ship built before 2000, and around 30 percent against current designs. There will be kinetic floors and 750 kilowatts of solar power generation on the vessel. The ship’s hybrid engine can also obtain power from liquefied natural gas or diesel. The liner should see a 20 percent cut of propulsion energy and 50 percent cuts on electricity load, according to Ecoship . The vessel will host Peace Boat’s educational journeys, but will also serve as a floating laboratory committed to research on the ocean , climate , and green technologies. It’s set to be delivered in time for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. + Peace Boat + Ecoship + Oliver Design Via Oliver Design and Ecoship Images via Oliver Design and Ecoship

Here is the original post: 
Retractable solar sails to help power "world’s most eco-friendly cruise ship"

Millions of insect species will go extinct before we even discover them

December 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Millions of insect species will go extinct before we even discover them

Only 200 years ago did humans begin to systematically categorize the species, and within that relatively small stretch, we’ve recorded about 2 million species of plants, animals, fungi. But that’s only the tip of the iceberg. By some estimates, we still have another 2 million to uncover, and by others, there are upwards of 100 million left to be classified. However, with deforestation, sprawl, and, above all, climate change putting the planet in jeopardy, scientists believe millions of species will die off before we will even encounter them. And the implications of this are far-reaching. For several decades, scientists have warned that we are headed into, or may even be experiencing, the sixth mass extinction . As The Guardian notes , there have been five other instances like this in the past, including the end-Cretaceous extinction, which led to the demise of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. However, to know for certain if we’re amidst doom and gloom, scientists need to determine the rate at which species are disappearing, and when human activity is factored in, how by how much this rate increases. Related: Plummeting insect population signals potential “ecological Armageddon” Previous studies have deemed humans to indeed be major drivers, possibly causing animal species to go extinct “up to 100 times” faster because of human activity, as one  team of American and Mexican scientists  found. However, Terry Erwin, a world-renowned tropical entomologist, says that the data that has historically been used in these studies is wholly incomplete and “biased towards a very small portion of biodiversity.” Rather, if scientists want an accurate picture of existing conditions, they need to look beyond vertebrates to invertebrates like worms, snails, spiders, octopuses, and most importantly insects, which account for about 70 percent of the Earth’s living creatures. Indeed, only one in 200 of all known species is a mammal. With that said, to determine the true rate of extinction of species on Earth, you need to determine the scale of the insect kingdom—and this is the biggest challenge. While the scope of the insect population is still being explored, The Guardian does cite a “breakthrough” that’s offered some insight into what we’re dealing with. In 1982, Erwin headed to a rainforest in Panama with the goal of determining how many species of insect lived on average across one acre of forest. He chose one tree, which he draped in sheeting and used blasts of insecticide to fog the bugs out. Over several hours, as the insects evacuated the tree onto the sheeting, Erwin was able to collect 1,200 species of bugs, of which he later determined more than 100 of which were exclusive to that one tree. From those findings, he averaged that there are about 41,000 different species per hectare of rainforest, and in turn 30 million species worldwide. The estimates, however, he now deems conservative and suspects the number could actually be between 80 and 200 million, but adds that tens of thousands of them are probably disappearing annually without us even knowing. Of no surprise, climate change is being pinned as the fundamental driver of the great insect die off. Scientists have even noticed drops in the virgin forests of Ecuador and places where insecticides aren’t being used and humans have not cut down a single tree. As the Guardian writes, based on data collected, Erwin and his collaborators have found that the Amazon rainforest has been slowly dying out over the last 35 years. “[If the forest goes out] everything that lives in it will be affected,” he told the site. The disappearance of insect life on Earth would surely mean the end of all life on Earth. Insects are responsible for the planet’s course of evolution from flowering plants to food chains and are key to keeping those systems functioning. As EO Wilson, a celebrated Harvard entomologist, and inventor of sociobiology, tells The Guardian, humanity would last all of a few months without insects and other land-based arthropods. “After that, most of the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals would go, along with the flowering plants. The planet would become an immense compost heap, covered in shoals of carcasses and dead trees that refused to rot. Briefly, fungi would bloom in untold numbers. Then, they too would die off. The Earth would revert to what it was like in the Silurian period, 440m years ago, when life was just beginning to colonise the soil – a spongy, silent place, filled with mosses and liverworts, waiting for the first shrimp brave enough to try its luck on land.” Via The Guardian Images via MaxPixel and Wiki Commons

View original post here: 
Millions of insect species will go extinct before we even discover them

Florentijn Hofman’s Famous Oversized Rubber Duck Joins the Tall Ships Festival in Los Angeles

August 22, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Florentijn Hofman’s Famous Oversized Rubber Duck Joins the Tall Ships Festival in Los Angeles

The giant Rubber Duck is back! Florentijn Hofman ’s oversized bath toy is continuing to make its rounds, and its latest port of call is in Los Angeles! The world-famous float is making its West Coast debut as part of the Tall Ships Festival LA . Read the rest of Florentijn Hofman’s Famous Oversized Rubber Duck Joins the Tall Ships Festival in Los Angeles Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , florentijn hofman , Giant Rubber Duck , green design , inflatable sculpture , rubber duck , sustainable design , Tall Ships Festival LA

Read the original:
Florentijn Hofman’s Famous Oversized Rubber Duck Joins the Tall Ships Festival in Los Angeles

Greenwash Watch: Can a Monster Ocean Liner Be Green?

December 7, 2009 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Greenwash Watch: Can a Monster Ocean Liner Be Green?

Royal Caribbean It is the Oasis of the Seas, by far the biggest cruise ship ever built.

View original post here:
Greenwash Watch: Can a Monster Ocean Liner Be Green?

Lamaconcept Felt Carpet with Embedded LED Lighting

December 7, 2009 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Lamaconcept Felt Carpet with Embedded LED Lighting

Think: Material was launched at September’s IIDEX /Neocon trade show and reprised at Construction Canada last week. It is a collection of the latest “new and sustainable materials” from around the world, curated by materials consultant Jim Salazar. We will present some of the more interesting ones in our Materials Monday feature

Read more:
Lamaconcept Felt Carpet with Embedded LED Lighting

Bad Behavior has blocked 1606 access attempts in the last 7 days.