Cool Converted Shipping Container Structures From Around the World

September 14, 2020 by  
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When you think of shipping containers, you probably picture huge … The post Cool Converted Shipping Container Structures From Around the World appeared first on Earth 911.

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Cool Converted Shipping Container Structures From Around the World

Cargotecture: Another Future Path for Modern Architecture

September 7, 2020 by  
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The world is heading towards sustainability, which includes making the … The post Cargotecture: Another Future Path for Modern Architecture appeared first on Earth 911.

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Cargotecture: Another Future Path for Modern Architecture

Cargotecture meets wine country in Paso Robles

July 27, 2020 by  
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Sipping a glass of Cabernet Sauvignon while gazing out over rows and rows of grapes is a thrill for any wine aficionado. But the Geneseo Inn at Cass Winery in Paso Robles, California offers something even more exciting — now wine-lovers can wake up to those vineyard views inside a repurposed shipping container . Cargotecture has come to wine country at last. The new, eight-unit bed and breakfast is now open and accepting guests. Ecotech Design, collaborating with the container fabricator CRATE MODULAR and the winery co-owners, Steve Cass and Ted Plemons, chose a 60-foot live oak tree as the centerpiece of the property. Ecotech Design integrated 20 factory-built, steel containers with conventional construction and set them in the rolling hills of the vineyard. Related: Is cargotecture the future of construction? What you need to know for your next project The units incorporate two containers each. The interior of each container is made from locally sourced, sustainable materials and features a modern, minimalist aesthetic. Parking is built underneath the units, so that cars don’t mar the landscape views. The 12-foot high clerestory, cathedral ceilings have multiple operable windows to invite light and fresh air inside. Guests can regulate the temperature and conserve energy by opening and closing these windows. The bridal unit suite is larger and more deluxe than the other units; it is built with a 40-foot and a 20-foot container. There is also an office cluster, which uses four 20-foot containers and features reception areas and a communal deck shaded by an oak tree . The B&B’s earthy exterior color palette complements both the landscape and the wine labels used at Cass Winery . “The design was inspired by the vineyard itself,” said Walter Scott Perry, founder and principal of Ecotech Design . “The most compelling attribute of this project is the use of modular components, in combination with recycled materials, to enhance visual interest and create an impressive panoramic openness that connects interior spaces, walkways, and decks. These connect with the vineyard vistas beyond.” Perry has been a leader in sustainable building design since the 1970s, when he was a part of the passive solar design movement in Santa Fe, New Mexico. In the last 15 years, he’s built with shipping containers at sites around California. The winery personnel are excited to welcome guests to stay on the 145-acre vineyard and to serve them an estate breakfast prepared by the executive chef. Many ingredients are grown on-site in the chef gardens . In addition to a deluxe food and wine experience, guests can book a private massage, yoga session, archery lesson, photography workshop or horseback excursion. + Ecotech Design Photography by Paul Vu Photography via Ecotech Design

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Cargotecture meets wine country in Paso Robles

Nearly 20 living trees support this lush garden arbor in Japan

March 31, 2020 by  
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After nearly 20 years, Tokyo-based architecture firm APL design workshop recently returned to the Maezawa Garden House in Kurobe, Japan to update the grounds for the Theater Olympic 2019 international drama festival. In addition to updating the outdoor amphitheater that they had completed in 1989, the architects created the new White Flower Arbor, a stunning open-air pavilion, supported by 17 living oak and cedar trees, that blurs the boundaries between nature and architecture.  Located near the Japan Sea, the Maezawa Garden House was created by Pritzker Architecture Prize laureate Maki Fumihiko in 1982 for global Japanese company YKK. Surrounded by forest on all sides, the vast property stretches from northeast to the southwest with the house on the east end, an outdoor amphitheater on the west side and a long, undulating lawn with a natural garden in between. The amphitheater , also known as the Open Air Theater, comprises a circular, grassy mound and a semicircular slope with timber steps; the open layout and the long adjacent lawn allows for events that can accommodate anywhere from 300 to 1,000 spectators. Related: A forgotten railway takes on new life as a new cultural destination in France When the outdoor amphitheater was selected as one of the venues for the Theater Olympics 2019, APL design workshop was asked to add stage lighting to the steps — built from reclaimed railroad ties — and temporary dressing rooms, which the architects created from repurposed shipping containers lined with timber.  To provide a rest space for visitors, the architects also designed the new White Flower Arbor, an open-air pavilion with a lightweight roof supported by 26 pillars that include 17 living trees and 9 steel columns. The pavilion, which was meant to be temporary, has now become a permanent feature of the grounds due to popular demand. The architects said, “As this gazebo sits on the foot of a slope covered by a forest — almost like a Japanese Shinto shrine — its entity sinking into the forest looks like a part of nature from the outside, while on the inside, its chilly air and darkness bring the people in the gazebo to a world of myth.” + APL design workshop Photography by Kitajima Toshiharu / Archi Photo via APL design workshop

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Nearly 20 living trees support this lush garden arbor in Japan

Roaming shipping container museum brings contemporary art through Panama

March 6, 2020 by  
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Panamanian architect Héctor Ayarza has figured out a cool and sustainable way to bring art to the masses. His fantastic Wandering Museum is a roaming structure made out of two reclaimed shipping containers . The project helps bring certain works of art from the Museum of Contemporary Art throughout neighborhoods in Panama City. The project began as a collaboration between the Panama City-based Museum of Contemporary Art and Ayarza. Hoping to showcase certain pieces that may not have permanent space in the museum itself, the team decided to create a sustainable way to bring a selection of contemporary art collections to people in various locations throughout the city. They did this by turning to recycled shipping containers. Related: Spectacular new shipping container museum nestles near China’s Great Wall Towed on the flatbed of a truck, the lightweight Wandering Museum travels easily through the city streets. While it is on the road, the traveling museum is instantly recognizable thanks to its multicolored design. Bright stripes of red, orange and green cover the shipping containers’ exteriors, bringing a fun, vibrant feel to the project. Once parked, the shipping containers are laid out in a perpendicular formation. The entrance is through one end of the first shipping container, which is painted black inside. This is the main exhibition space, with a  minimalist atmosphere that emits the same contemporary style of the permanent museum. The second shipping container has interior walls that are clad in a low-cost particle board with various shelves. There is also a floor-to-ceiling chalkboard, where visitors can leave messages. An entire side of the container can be completely left open, inviting art-lovers to explore the interior contents while also socializing in the make-shift courtyard space between the two structures. + Héctor Ayarza Via ArchDaily Photography by Fernando Alda via Héctor Ayarza

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Roaming shipping container museum brings contemporary art through Panama

This modular, shipping container home was completed in 2 months

February 3, 2020 by  
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Completed in March 2019, this modular home in the East Hampton town of Amagansett, Long Island encompasses a kitchen, four bedrooms and three bathrooms within 1,800 square feet of living space. Four repurposed 40-by-8 -foot shipping containers were used to construct the main part of the structure, two placed side-by-side and two more stacked on top. The inside was then carved out to create a larger interior space. The whole building was installed in two days and fully completed in two months. New York-based architecture firm MB Architecture is responsible for the project. The proposed site was a triangular, wooded corner lot on high ground that the clients hoped to turn into a summer and year-round weekend home with a large outdoor space and enough room for a pool and a lawn. Although the building site was restrictive, its high elevation provided beautiful views and plenty of natural light. Related: This container home in Brazil helps its residents disconnect In addition to the limited construction site, the clients were also set on sticking to a strict budget, which, after examination, proved to be much lower than the original projected costs. The shipping container method presented the perfect solution, significantly lowering the costs of construction while offering a unique design strategy. MB Architecture proposed prefabricating the building off-site and lowering the cost of transportation and materials by using the shipping containers.  The designers installed a wide staircase, which took up the width of a single shipping container , and extended the high living room ceiling to create a landing area that faces the backyard. Floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall windows were added to take advantage of the natural sunlight and provide breathtaking views of the sunset and spacious outdoor area. An additional shipping container guest house consisting of two bedrooms was strategically placed away from the main structure to create a courtyard in between the two buildings, making the property feel larger. + MB Architecture Via AN Interior Photography by Matthew Carbone via MB Architecture

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This modular, shipping container home was completed in 2 months

Artist David Mach designs sculptural building out of repurposed shipping containers

July 12, 2019 by  
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UK-artist and self-proclaimed “accidental architect” David Mach has just unveiled an amazing design for his first ever building. Slated for a new development just west of Edinburgh, Mach 1 is a massive, sculptural building built out of over 30 shipping containers . The building is a collaboration between the developers of Edinburgh Park, Parabola and Stirling Prize-nominated architects, Dixon Jones , who created the project’s master plan. The complex, which is just in the planning stages, is slated for a large 43-acre lot just west of the Scottish capital. The development plan envisions a vibrant community made up of office space, a new public square, sports and leisure facilities, a health center, along with various retail shops and restaurants. Related: David Mach Creates Enormous Sculptures from Coat Hangers and Matches During the planning stages, the decision was made to commission a landmark for the new development, something that would be eye-catching, but also multi-functional. Enter, UK artist, David Mach , who is known for creating immense, dynamic art installations using a wide range of materials. Mach’s vision for the project is what has been named “Mach 1”. The formidable concepts envisions a large building made out of more than 30 shipping containers stacked at various angles. Slated to hold court in the middle of the development, Mach 1 will stand out not only for its large stature, but also its use of repurposed materials . The artist explains that the building is an homage to the way that urban developments can put sustainability at the forefront of new projects, “What we are planning to build, is a substantial building, made from around 30 sea containers. There is quite a dramatic shape to the building, not a regular piece of architecture. It will be something that you really notice. It is a building that really makes a statement about itself.” The shipping container building will house the development’s marketing offices to start, including a display area that will feature a full site model and information about the construction of Edinburgh Park. Mach 1 will also include a large gallery space for exhibitions and a cafe. The interior will be outfitted with various flexible elements in order to be able to host small and large events throughout the year. + David Mach Via Archdaily Images via David Mach , Dixon Jones  and Assembly Studios

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Artist David Mach designs sculptural building out of repurposed shipping containers

Is cargotecture the future of construction? What you need to know for your next project

March 11, 2019 by  
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As the construction industry continues to evolve and adapt to innovations like green buildings, the push for more sustainable materials  and the efforts to reduce waste, there is one trend that is pushing the limits of design — cargotecture. Steel shipping containers have been a key component of global trade for the past 50 years, and now these steel boxes that are 8 feet wide by 8-and-a-half feet high — and either 20 or 40 feet long — are becoming a recycled building material that you can use to build your own home. There are millions of shipping containers all over the world just sitting in various ports, as returning empty containers to their original location is extremely costly. But now, these shipping containers are being used to build everything from low-cost housing to fabulous vacation homes instead of being scrapped. However, could cargotecture be too good to be true when it comes to building a home? Here are the pros and cons of using shipping containers for your next construction project. Related: Massive shipping container shopping center to pop up in Warsaw Pros Cost-effective The shape of shipping containers makes them ideal for repurposing into buildings . Compared to building a similar structure with brick and mortar, on average, a cargotecture can be 30 percent cheaper. However, the savings will depend on the location and what type of home you are building. Another thing to keep in mind is that a cargotecture home won’t be the same as what you are used to in a traditionally-built home— if cost is a top priority. The look and function will be different, and you will have to make compromises.  You can upgrade to get the features you want with a little more money. Ultimately, you can definitely cut costs when using cargotecture. Structural stability Since steel containers are designed to carry tons of merchandise across rough ocean  tides, they are “virtually indestructible.” Earthquakes and hurricanes are no match for cargotecture, which make containers an excellent choice for building a home in areas prone to natural disasters. Construction speed A traditional housing structure can take months to build, but with cargotecture, all you need is about two to three weeks since they are basically prefabricated. Not to mention, modifications can be made quickly off-site. Or, if you are a hardcore DIYer , you can build a home out of a shipping container much easier than you could with lumber, a hammer and nails. You can also customize a layout by stacking the containers for multiple floors and splicing them together for a larger space. However, there is a lot of modification required when you use cargotecture. Depending on the design, you may need to add steel reinforcement. Heating and cooling can also be a major issue, so you definitely need to have a temperature control strategy in mind. Recycling materials When recycled shipping containers are used in cargotecture, it can be extremely eco-friendly . Repurposing the containers instead of scrapping and melting them can save a lot of energy and carbon emissions while preventing the use of traditional materials. Safety Good luck breaking into a cargotecture structure. Unless thieves have some dynamite or a blow torch, they are not getting inside. This makes cargotecture a perfect choice for building in rural and remote areas. Related: Stacked shipping containers transform into a thriving arts space in Venezuela Cons The green myth The downside with cargotecture is that sometimes it’s not as green as you would believe. Some people are using brand new containers instead of recycling old ones, and this completely defeats the purpose of cargotecture. And, to make a container habitable, there is a lot of energy required because of the modifications like sandblasting and cutting openings. Plus, the amount of fossil fuels needed to move the building makes cargotecture’s ecological footprint larger than you might think. Health hazards Obviously, when shipping containers are made, human habitation was not a factor in their design or construction. Many shipping containers have lead-based paints on the walls and chemicals like arsenic in the floors. You must deal with these issues before moving into a cargotecture home. Temperature control We mentioned earlier that modifications need to be made when you use cargotecture, and one of the biggest concerns is insulation and heat control. Large steel boxes are really good at absorbing and transmitting heat and cold. This ultimately means controlling the temperature inside your cargotecture home can be a challenge. You don’t want to be living inside an oven or a freezer, right? Building codes With cargotecture still being relatively new, it has caused some issues with local building codes. When you build small structures and don’t use traditional building materials , you should always check to see if they meet local regulations. Images via Julius Taminiau Architects, Mattelkan Architect, Whitaker Studio

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Is cargotecture the future of construction? What you need to know for your next project

Shipping container food halls slated to revitalize Southern California neighborhoods

December 10, 2018 by  
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Californian firm  Studio One Eleven has unveiled a massive new project that includes using various shipping containers to install modern versions of traditional food halls throughout various neighborhoods in Southern California. The food hall project will see a number of shipping containers being converted into vibrant social areas, where locals can enjoy a variety of small-scale food venues, breweries, organic gardens, playgrounds and entertainment spaces. In Orange County, Studio One Eleven — in collaboration with developer Howard CDM — is just about to complete the SteelCraft Garden Grove. Slated to open in 2019, the Garden Grove will be a multi-use complex built out of 10 shipping containers that will house various food and beverage options with ample seating located on a second level. Within the 20,000-square-foot space, a working organic farm will provide fresh produce for the chefs on site. Related: A sustainable campus is built from 22 recycled shipping containers Another project, Leisuretown, is also slated to open next year in Anaheim. In collaboration with developer LAB Holding, the architects are currently building a 32,000-square-foot complex comprised of two levels of shipping containers that will house a Modern Times craft brewery, a coffee roaster and a vegan Mexican food restaurant. LAB Holding Founder Shaheen Sadeghi explained that one of the project’s main goals is to preserve local structures while breathing new life through community-driven urban design . “When communities tear down history and build all new products, it takes away the soul and the heartbeat of the city,” Sadeghi said. “By preserving as many of these buildings as possible and blending with new products built in the area, we hope to create an even better-balanced neighborhood.” Last but not least, downtown Santa Ana will also be getting a vibrant new community area. The Roost is an existing complex made up of several renovated pre-war buildings. By adding shipping containers to the development, the Roost will have a new central beer garden and outdoor dining space. As one of Orange County’s first shipping container complexes, the food hall will serve as a new social center for the area. + Studio One Eleven Images via Studio One Eleven

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Shipping container food halls slated to revitalize Southern California neighborhoods

LOT-EK upcycles 140 shipping containers into an apartment complex in South Africa

November 27, 2018 by  
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A massive, modular residential building has risen in Johannesburg , South Africa with aims of revitalizing Maboneng Precinct, an area that’s recently undergone a dramatic transformation from a site of urban decay to a thriving enclave for creatives. Having extensive experience in cargotecture, New York- and Naples-based architectural design studio LOT-EK was tapped to design the mixed-use building, which was completed last year. Dubbed Drivelines Studio, the building comprises a total of 140 shipping containers and includes affordable housing as well as ground-floor retail. Located on a triangular site atop an existing single-story structure that used to house a car repair shop, Drivelines Studio includes seven floors with the top six levels comprising residential units, all of which are open-plan studios ranging in size from 300 square feet to 600 square feet and equipped with outdoor terraces with views of greenery below. The ground floor consists of retail along Albertina Sisulu Road, additional residential units in the rear and a private courtyard for residents with gardens and a pool. “Embracing the triangular geometry of the site, the building is conceived as a billboard where two separate volumes of residential units are hinged at the narrow east end of the lot, framing the social space of the open interior courtyard ,”  the firm explained in a project statement. “As in a billboard, the building outer facades are straight and flush with the lot line while the facades in the inner courtyard are articulated by the staircases, the elevator tower and the bridges connecting all levels, and by the open circulation paths activated by the units spillover onto their outdoor space.” Related: Repurposed shipping containers inject funky and unexpected color to a historic home renovation The upcycled shipping containers retain their original color and corrugated siding to reference their industrial past and to allude to the city’s reputation as the largest inland port in the world. The containers were stacked and cut on site with large diagonal cutouts for windows that give the building its distinctive, zigzagging facade pattern. + LOT-EK Photography by Dave Southwood via LOT-EK

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LOT-EK upcycles 140 shipping containers into an apartment complex in South Africa

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