ScottWhitbyStudio transforms a shipping container into a pop-up cinema

March 21, 2017 by  
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We’ve seen shipping containers repurposed into everything from homes to museums , but ScottWhitbyStudio’s recent cargotecture creation marks the first pop-up cinema that we’ve heard of. The London-based architecture and creative consultancy converted a single container into Caution Cinema, an immersive and funky movie theater as part of the ‘Beyond Zero’ health and safety campaign. The mobile cinema plays instructional videos to promote vital dockside safety information to port employees up and down the country. Working together with a major UK port operator, ScottWhitbyStudio was asked to create an engaging pop-up cinema that provided an immersive viewing experience that would block out the hectic and noisy port surroundings. In choosing the commonly found shipping container as the cinema structure, the designers introduced an element of surprise by dramatically transforming the windowless container interior into a “dark and mysterious realm, which challenged expectations.” Attendees to the Caution Cinema enter via a disorienting zigzagging path to the cinema, where all external light and sound are blocked out. Related: The epic Creative Co-Op Is a Multi-faceted Film Studio Made from Shipping Containers “Using this multi-sensory experience, visitors are forced to take extra care and to proceed with caution—as promoted by the safety campaign,” write the architects. “It is hoped that the memory of this multi-sensory experience and intervention will be embed[ded] in the user’s memory for a long time to come.” All internal surfaces, from the entrance path to the cinema and seating, are clad in over a thousand pyramidal acoustic foam pieces laid out in a checkered pattern of black, blue, and red. The resilient foam pyramids create a soundless chamber so that attendees can focus on the video presentation without external distraction. + ScottWhitbyStudio Images via ScottWhitbyStudio © Osman Marfo-Gyasi

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ScottWhitbyStudio transforms a shipping container into a pop-up cinema

Repurposed shipping containers make a bold statement at the National Theater Company of Korea

March 1, 2017 by  
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Seoul’s trendy mall made of shipping containers isn’t the only place you’ll see cargotecture in the city. Urbantainer , the same local firm behind the world’s largest cargotecture mall Common Ground , recently completed an extension for the National Theater Company of Korea , one of the nation’s flagship theater companies based in the capital. The new visitor area comprises a series of red shipping containers skillfully transformed into a contemporary and functional space that still preserves an industrial character. The National Theater Company of Korea (NTCK) commissioned Urbantainer to create a visitor area that would serve as a social space within the grounds. To integrate the new space with the existing buildings, the designers aligned the containers with the building axis and painted them the same shade of red as the NTCK logo. “While highlighting the modular form of containers, the design is deliberately held light and maintains a balance with existing features and objects such as a former oil station and the grass square,” writes Urbantainer. Related: World’s largest shipping container shopping mall pops up in Seoul Although the cargotecture building looks like it’s made up of separate containers stacked together, many of the container walls were removed to create an interior with a 12-meter-long column-less space to accommodate large gatherings. High ceilings, access to natural light, and the light color palette give the interior a spacious and open feel. The flexible open-plan area can be manipulated with partitions and moving walls to allow for a variety of functions. + Urbantainer Images © Kyungsub Shin

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Repurposed shipping containers make a bold statement at the National Theater Company of Korea

Spectacular new shipping container museum nestles near China’s Great Wall

December 30, 2016 by  
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Nestled near China’s famous Great Wall rests a new cultural museum made with shipping containers . The Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum designed by IAPA Design Consultants offers an opportunity to learn while appreciating glorious scenery. Locally sourced and recycled materials add to the peaceful museum’s sustainability. IAPA worked with The Mother Earth Happiness Group to design the Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum in Beijing, China. The design statement said the architects emphasized art culture and environmental protection in their vision for the sleek center that includes offices and exhibit areas wrapped in patios, courtyards, and gardens. Trees and hills of the encircling Great Wall historic site root the museum in nature . Related: Rammed earth Palenque Cultural Tambillo is designed to celebrate Afro-ecuadorean arts Modular containers provide the museum’s main buildings, and recycled timber decking adds a natural touch. Details like woven reeds sourced locally for the outdoor corridor ceilings add to the museum’s beauty. Stone, steel, and hemp are among the other building materials utilized. Varying building heights allow the complex to blend in without blocking too much of the landscape; the design statement says courtyard house style inspired the architects. The Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum is a place to relax; visitors can soak in the scenery via a roof garden, viewing platform, viewing tower, or from the bridges connecting the shipping container buildings. They can wander about the museum, dine in a restaurant, or seek refreshment in a teahouse. According to the design statement, “Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum is a representation of the continuity of traditional cultural heritage.” IAPA’s goal as stated on their website is to use “modern design techniques to interpret traditional oriental philosophy.” It appears they accomplished that goal elegantly in the Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum. + IAPA Design Consultants Via ArchDaily Images via ZENG Zhe/ArchDaily

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Spectacular new shipping container museum nestles near China’s Great Wall

Spectacular new shipping container museum nestles near China’s Great Wall

December 30, 2016 by  
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Nestled near China’s famous Great Wall rests a new cultural museum made with shipping containers . The Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum designed by IAPA Design Consultants offers an opportunity to learn while appreciating glorious scenery. Locally sourced and recycled materials add to the peaceful museum’s sustainability. IAPA worked with The Mother Earth Happiness Group to design the Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum in Beijing, China. The design statement said the architects emphasized art culture and environmental protection in their vision for the sleek center that includes offices and exhibit areas wrapped in patios, courtyards, and gardens. Trees and hills of the encircling Great Wall historic site root the museum in nature . Related: Rammed earth Palenque Cultural Tambillo is designed to celebrate Afro-ecuadorean arts Modular containers provide the museum’s main buildings, and recycled timber decking adds a natural touch. Details like woven reeds sourced locally for the outdoor corridor ceilings add to the museum’s beauty. Stone, steel, and hemp are among the other building materials utilized. Varying building heights allow the complex to blend in without blocking too much of the landscape; the design statement says courtyard house style inspired the architects. The Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum is a place to relax; visitors can soak in the scenery via a roof garden, viewing platform, viewing tower, or from the bridges connecting the shipping container buildings. They can wander about the museum, dine in a restaurant, or seek refreshment in a teahouse. According to the design statement, “Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum is a representation of the continuity of traditional cultural heritage.” IAPA’s goal as stated on their website is to use “modern design techniques to interpret traditional oriental philosophy.” It appears they accomplished that goal elegantly in the Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum. + IAPA Design Consultants Via ArchDaily Images via ZENG Zhe/ArchDaily

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Spectacular new shipping container museum nestles near China’s Great Wall

Petroleum giant abandons tar sands in favor of wind power

December 29, 2016 by  
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In a startling move, Norwegian state-owned oil and gas company Statoil recently pulled all its investments out of the Alberta tar sands after winning a contract to develop an offshore wind farm in U.S. waters. CleanTechnica reports the company began selling off its tar sands assets almost within hours of learning earlier this month it had won the right to build a wind farm off the coast of New York State. According to CleanTechnica, the opportunity to develop the wind facility and provide power so close to New York City made the clean energy project a high-visibility, and thus high-status venture for Statoil. Winning the project was not easy, as the bid process was “intense,” but Statoil’s triumph means they’re part of a new coordinated program to develop a series of wind farms off the Atlantic coast. The project is just one of 11 offshore areas leased for development by the Department of the Interior, through its Bureau of Ocean Energy Management . Related: The world’s largest floating wind farm will be operational next year CleanTechnica notes that much of the 3000 miles of ocean along America’s Eastern Seaboard is perfect for renewable energy development for several reasons. The relatively shallow waters of the Continental Shelf make building easier, while the proximity to major population centers all along the way make accessing markets a breeze. Add to that the fact that hot southern states are in dire need of affordable energy to power air conditioners, and you’ve got a recipe for strong demand for power. While they might have taken a step in the right direction by dropping dirty tar sands oil, Statoil’s hands are still far from clean. It recently invested in oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, and has some questionable shale gas assets in the U.S. – including some in the Bakken play, the planned origin for the now-stalled Dakota Access Pipeline . Via Clean Technica Images via Parrot of Doom and Barrow Offshore Wind Turbines , Wikimedia Commons

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Petroleum giant abandons tar sands in favor of wind power

Nha Trangs first hostel built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Vietnam

November 14, 2016 by  
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Created with the motto that “everyone around the world can be connected into a big family,” the Ccasa hostel was designed with a sense of openness and transparency that puts the spotlight on the shared living spaces, rather than the sleeping quarters. The three shipping containers, which house the beds, serve as a colorful backdrop painted in the primary colors of blue, red, and yellow. Each container contains a different bedroom layout, from multiple bunk beds to a family-style room with a queen bed. The bathrooms are housed in a “washing block” in a separate three-story structure next to the shipping containers. The kitchen facilities are located on the first floor in between the containers and the entrance. Related: Kurgo’s bright orange shipping container office is a haven for dogs Natural ventilation is key to the design of Ccasa hostel as a means to mitigate Nha Trang’s muggy and tropical weather. Instead of stuffy corridors, open metal bridges that wrap around a tall tree link the container bedrooms. An accessible terrace roof offers large hammocks and city views. A pergola with climbing vegetation wraps around the hostel to add an extra skin of greenery that protects the interior from direct sunlight and helps create a cooling microclimate. Encaustic cement tiles, old wood windows, and flat winnowing baskets were also upcycled as decorations, solar shades, and room dividers. + Ccasa Hostel Via ArchDaily Images by Quang Tran

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Nha Trangs first hostel built from recycled shipping containers pops up in Vietnam

Tiny power plant sucks CO2 from the air and turns it into fuel

November 11, 2016 by  
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Ineratec , an offshoot of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), has devised a creative solution to the excess carbon dioxide (CO2) soaking the atmosphere. The company developed a small power plant that sucks CO2 out of the air and turns it into fuel . Researchers aim to switch on a pilot plant, called the Soletair Project, at the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland later this year. Ineratec’s mini power plant is so small it can fit inside a shipping container . KIT says there are three parts to the system: a microstructured reactor, a direct air capture unit created by VIT, and an electrolysis unit which runs on solar power created by Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT). The direct air capture unit extracts CO2 out of the air and then the reactor converts the CO2 and regenerative hydrogen via the electrolysis unit into fuel. The Ineratec founders say the system can produce gasoline, kerosene, or diesel. Related: Cutting-edge MIT research converts carbon emissions into usable liquid fuel Ineratec founder Tim Böltken told New Atlas, “We supply an entirely new, modular technology that is a real alternative to the costly large chemical facilities used for the conventional gas-to-liquid process.” Böltken said there are many other possible applications for the plant, including gathering fuel from sewage treatment facilities. He also suggested organic farmers might be able to use the system to generate energy. VTT Principal Scientist Pekka Simell said in a statement , “The project will produce expertise for enterprises in various fields, and it will result in a multidisciplinary industrial integration that no one company can achieve on its own.” VTT and LUT will build a demonstration plant set to being operating this year, and in 2017 LUT plans to continue testing. According to KIT, Ineratec is planning to commercialize the compact plant, which could hit the market in 2018. Via New Atlas Images via Ineratec and KIT

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Worlds largest shipping container shopping mall pops up in Seoul

November 8, 2016 by  
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Located in Seoul’s Gwangjin District, Common Ground was an experimental project that sought to revitalize an unused lot in the middle of the capital. The use of prefabricated shipping containers lowered construction cost and reduced construction time to just five months. Each container is painted an eye-catching bright blue and is stacked together into three-story structures that divide the lot into two main spaces: the Market Hall and the Street Market. The stacked containers frame a central square that hosts weekend markets, exhibitions, and performances. Related: Bright and bold QUO shipping container mall springs up in Buenos Aires “Street Market draws inspiration from an alley market and keeps the texture of the container intact as much as possible,” writes Urbantainer. “Market Hall capitalises on trusses with strong architectural functions and serve as a reminder of the feeling of a market . In this part, the verticality of stacked container modules and the frames between containers are emphasised.” In keeping with its unconventional form, Common Ground hosts up-and-coming new designers, mid-sized shops, and editorial stores, rather than large mainstream brands. The 200 shipping containers house seventy stores, twenty restaurants, and a third-floor roof terrace. + Urbantainer Images via Urbantainer

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Everything in this East London home is made with natural wool

November 8, 2016 by  
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The three-story building, with interiors curated by stylist Karina Garrick, proved a stunning showcase for the renewable resource. Furnishings came from major brands as well as independent designers and makers from throughout Britain. The Wool BnB took a lighthearted approach to interior design, with fun details like a newspaper and cereal boxes made entirely of wool felt by artist Lucy Sparrow . In the living room, striking accessories like a large Merino wool wall hanging by artist and extreme knitter Jacqueline Fink popped against walls in Deep Space Blue from independent British paint manufacturer Little Greene . Above the fireplace and the sofa, hand-knotted wall pieces from British surface designer Allistair Covell’s Canvas to Carpet collection added pattern and vibrant color. Every decent BnB takes pride in its breakfast offerings, and the Wool BnB is no different. Textile artist Jessica Dance provided a “Full English Breakfast” featuring toast, eggs, sausage, mushrooms and bacon made entirely of knitted wool. A selection of knitted deli meats and beverages rounded out the meal options. In the basement, Kivo felt room divider panels by Herman Miller formed a cozy seating area. The eat-in kitchen featured molded chairs made from Solidwool , a composite material that incorporates coarse wool otherwise considered a by-product of sheep farming. In the back yard, a mini cottage on wheels, inspired by traditional shepherd’s huts, provided extra room for guests. Custom-made by Artisan Shepherds Huts in the English countryside, the cozy space featured oak floors and a wood-burning stove. Wool rugs, including a checkered design by Brintons and vibrant Liberty print carpets from Alternative Flooring , were given additional padding with wool underlays, which have the benefit of smoothing out uneven floors as well as providing effective insulation. In the master bedroom, a plush bed boasted a wool-upholstered headboard and Shetland wool mattress by Vispring , topped with a wool-filled duvet by The Wool Room and hand-knitted throws by London-based design studio Melanie Porter . Wool is both breathable and insulating, and its high water and nitrogen content also makes it naturally fire-retardant, making it an ideal material for the bedroom. Upstairs, a children’s reading room featured a graphic kilim wool rug and striking pendant lights from Janie Knitted Textiles , with shades made of strands of dip-dyed woven wool. The walk-in wardrobe featured rails of clothing from brands big and small, from traditional tweeds to knit sweaters, as well as technical performance textiles from Adidas, including sneakers that incorporate wool fibers. Unlike synthetic fibers, pure wool is biodegradable. A couple of years ago, the Campaign for Wool buried two sweaters, one made of Merino wool and one of acrylic, in the garden of Clarence House, the London residence of Prince Charles. When the sweaters were dug up months later, the wool sweater had mostly disintegrated, while the synthetic sweater stayed intact. A craft room teeming with skeins of knitting yarns, carpet yarns on large cones, lambswool fabrics and felted wool stools showcased the versatility of the renewable resource. The Campaign for Wool, jointly funded by the world’s largest wool growers from Britain, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand, organizes fashion, interiors and design events promoting the benefits of wool. + Campaign for Wool All images © Charlene Lam for Inhabitat

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Everything in this East London home is made with natural wool

Arctic town grows fresh produce in shipping container vertical garden

November 4, 2016 by  
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In Kotzebue, Alaska , temperatures can plunge to 60 degrees below zero, making crisp, local produce difficult to obtain. And when vegetables do make it to grocery store shelves from other parts of the world, they’re incredibly expensive even though they may have been picked two or three weeks prior. So Kikiktagruk Inupiat Corporation (KIC) is trying a fresh approach: hydroponically growing produce in shipping containers . KIC started subsidiary company Arctic Greens to provide fresh produce to Kotzebue residents. Partnering with Anchorage-based Vertical Harvest Hydroponics to create a custom 40 foot container, KIC kicked off the hydroponic farm project this summer. Local grocery store Alaska Commercial (AC) agreed to buy the resulting produce. The first harvest was a success; according to Arctic Greens, local residents noticed an ” extraordinary difference in flavor and quality .” Related: Pop-up shipping container farm puts a full acre of lettuce in your backyard So far KIC aims to grow 21 herbs and vegetables such as kale, romaine lettuce, broccoli, and basil. KIC President Will Anderson said the hydroponic farm could produce as many as 550 pieces of fresh food every week by the time its fully operational. Since Arctic Greens can control temperatures inside the shipping container, the system may just be perfect to provide food in frigid winters. Part of the goal behind Arctic Greens is to empower people to “change some of the shopping patterns,” according to AC Director of Sales and Operations Jeff Cichosz. Supplying green produce at affordable prices, Arctic Greens could enable Alaskan communities to pursue healthier lifestyles. KIC will test Arctic Greens this winter to see what yields are like, and if successful spread the program to other areas of Alaska and even northern Canada. 28 AC stores sprinkled across the rural areas are ready to buy the produce should the project expand. + Arctic Greens Via KTUU Images via Kikiktagruk Inupiat Corporation Facebook

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