Denver firefighter uses 9 shipping containers to build a stunning family home

November 13, 2018 by  
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Denver-based firefighter Regan Foster used to spend his days putting out fires, but while recovering from a work-related injury, Foster decided to try his hand at building his dream home. The results are breathtaking. Using his own designs, Foster converted nine repurposed shipping containers into a massive 3,840-square-foot home with sophistication that rivals that of any professional architect’s work. Working with architect Joe Simmons of BlueSky Studio , Foster created the design and worked as the principal contractor on the project. To build out the frame of the home, four shipping containers were placed on the ground in pairs set 24 feet apart. Another four containers were then stacked on top of the first level, with a few pushed forward so that they cantilever over the ground floor. The ninth container was placed perpendicular to the back of the second level. Related: Starburst shipping container home to rise in the California desert The team topped the sections of the home with a series of flat roofs, and they covered the front facade in wood panels, contrasting nicely with the corrugated metal. An abundance of large windows were cut out of the containers in order to provide the interior with natural light . Although the exterior of the home is outstanding, the interior of the seven-bedroom, five-bathroom home is just as impressive. Walking into the great room, visitors are greeted with soaring 25-foot ceilings and an open floor plan that leads out to a large patio. As part of the master plan, Foster was determined to maintain the inherent industrial aesthetic of the shipping containers . The inside of the exterior walls were insulated and covered in drywall, but the interior walls and ceilings throughout the living space were left intact so that the corrugated metal would be visible. Foster, who has a passion for furniture making, used reclaimed wood in many of the home’s custom furnishings and design elements. For example, the flooring throughout the home is made with reclaimed barn wood and boards from a felled tree. Foster even refashioned an old walnut slab into a sliding door and used some waste lumber to create a cantilevered walkway that runs the length the second floor. Needless to say, the process of building his own home sparked a new professional path for Foster and his family. After completing the project, Foster retired from the fire department and started his own design and construction company, Foster Design . The family also rents out their home on Airbnb. + Foster Design + BlueSky Studio Via Dwell Photography by Regan Foster and Chris Boylen via Foster Design

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Denver firefighter uses 9 shipping containers to build a stunning family home

Architect turns four shipping containers into an affordable and eco-friendly home

July 2, 2018 by  
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Architectural firm  Matt Elkan Architect has unveiled a beautiful home on Australia’s south coast, with a unique twist: it’s made out of four shipping containers. In addition to constructing the home out of repurposed containers , the firm included a number of sustainable features in order to make the shipping container house as environmentally friendly as possible. From the beginning, architect Matt Elkan worked with the homeowners to create a design that would reflect their vision of an eco-friendly family home . He also wanted to prove that great design doesn’t have to break the bank. According to Elkan’s project description, “This project was always about economy, efficiency and how to do as much as possible on a very limited budget. However, the scale belies the efficiency of program and generosity of the outcome. The client’s conviction from the outset was that good architecture does not need to be expensive, and this project attempts to prove the theory.” Related: Stunning shipping container home can be yours for $125k Although keeping the budget as low as possible was a priority, minimizing the home’s environmental impact was of utmost importance as well. There was no excavation on the landscape and the four shipping containers were laid out strategically to take advantage of natural lighting and passive temperature control. The architects used natural wood insulation on the flat roof, and they did not include any VOC finishes in the building. Additionally, the home has Low E windows and recycled HW doors. For water conservation, 500 liters of water can be stored on-site. The result of this strategic design? A beautiful 1,000-square-foot home that sleeps up to ten people. Unlike some shipping container homes , the design proudly shows the shipping container aesthetic throughout the exterior and interior. The home’s exterior was painted in a dark grey, and the doors were left in their original state with script that marks their weight and shipping details. The interior also proudly shows its industrial origins. The container walls were painted in a glossy white with a few accent walls made of blonde wood, which was also used for the ceiling and flooring. Sliding farmhouse-style doors give the home a modern touch. An abundance of windows throughout the home flood the interior with natural light and also provide a strong connection to the home’s gorgeous surroundings. Many of the floor-to-ceiling windows can be concealed by the large shipping container doors. The living space opens up to a wooden deck, further blending the home’s interior with the exterior. + Matt Elkan Architect Via Dwell Photography by Simon Whitbread

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Architect turns four shipping containers into an affordable and eco-friendly home

Stunning shipping container home can be yours for $125k

November 22, 2017 by  
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Architect and builder Ty Kelly wanted to disconnect from the stresses of city life in Seattle – so he built an incredible shipping container home deep in the picturesque Montana plains. The 720-square-foot home is made from plenty of reclaimed materials , and it’s currently on the market for $125,000 . The one-bedroom, one-bath home is a true example of shipping container design done right. The home design is a sophisticated blend of wood and glass. Partially clad in wooden planking on the exterior, the house has an all-glass wall that provides natural light into the interior as well as gorgeous views of the rugged Montana landscape. Further embedding the home into its stunning surroundings is the wooden flooring that extends the length of the home onto an open-air deck on the exterior. Related: You can now buy tiny shipping container homes on Amazon Although the design of the home is quite contemporary, Kelly used quite a bit of reclaimed materials in the construction. The redwood flooring and wall panels are made out of reclaimed wood, as well as the kitchen’s butcher block counters, which were made out of leftover lumber from another project. On the interior, the living space, although quite compact, is incredibly comfortable. The kitchen has a wood stove as well as the typical modern conveniences such as a dishwasher and washer and dryer. The home’s bathroom layout, however, is quite a different story. The home comes complete with an outdoor shower on the side deck that lets the homeowners truly get back to nature. Via Dwell Photos via Zillow  

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Stunning shipping container home can be yours for $125k

Off-grid shipping container cabin has a warm wooden interior

March 31, 2017 by  
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Shipping container residences can be elaborate and complex, but sometimes bringing it back to basics is the key to good living. At the request of their client, San Francisco-based architects  YAMAMAR  created a simple, off-grid container cabin getaway out of two  repurposed shipping containers tucked into a pristine natural forest in North California’s Mount Lassen area. The container cabin is located on 1,000 acres of pristine wilderness. The idyllic location is next to an old creek bed with amazing sunset views of the surroundings. At the request of the property owner, who had been previously using an old Fleetwood trailer to sleep on site, the new structure had to fit into this natural area by operating completely off-grid . Working within the restrictions set by the local nature conservancy for permanent structures, the team began by customizing two shipping containers off site. This reduced the project’s overall footprint and production costs. Related: A glazed container cabin that reflects the Colorado sky Once fused together, the new cabin was built out with simple materials such as  reclaimed Douglas fir panels on the flooring and walls. To generate power, a solar array was installed on the roof, but the home uses propane for most of its lighting and heating needs. The adjacent creek is the home’s natural source for fresh water. In contrast to some luxury dwellings found in the world of shipping container design, this off-grid cabin was meant to offer the basics and keep the focus on the amazing setting. The compact interior is equipped with a small kitchen and one bedroom with a large window that offers incredible views. Two sliding doors on either side of the home roll open on castors and can be locked up tight when not in use. + YAMAMAR Design Via  Dwell Photography by Bruce Damonte

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Off-grid shipping container cabin has a warm wooden interior

Ghost Barn built of locally felled timber glows like a lantern at night

March 31, 2017 by  
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With a name like Ghost Barn and a glowing, lantern-like appearance at night, this fiberglass-clad structure could easily be mistaken for a haunted hut. Rest assured, however, the building is actually a new model-making shed completed by British firm Invisible Studio in the woods of Bath. The architects designed the prototyping workshop using unseasoned spruce timber grown and milled on-site. Invisible Studio constructed Ghost Barn to complement their existing woodland studio and to serve as a space for full-scale model making. Built of locally sourced five-by-two timber planks in less than two weeks, the new prototyping workshop was an exercise in “constructional efficiency.” Minimal drawings were created before construction started to allow the build team to decide much of the design in an ad-hoc way, though the architects determined the materials and the overall farm shed -like appearance. Related: Super-local energy-efficient Caretaker’s House is built from locally grown and felled timber “The project is the first of a series of ‘equivalent’ projects that use same-section timber,” write the architects. “The project also relates to Piers Taylor’s PhD topic exploring contingencies that emerge through incorporating making in to design.” The mono-pitched Ghost Barn is clad in impact-resistant fiberglass and corrugated steel , materials that reference the local agricultural vernacular. The fiberglass walls allow natural light to pierce into the interior and give the building the appearance of a glowing lantern when lit at night. A large opening allows the designers to move large models and materials in and out of the building with ease. + Invisible Studio Via Dezeen Images via Invisible Studio

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Ghost Barn built of locally felled timber glows like a lantern at night

Light-filled shipping container home is an artistic triumph in the French countryside

December 7, 2015 by  
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Carol Milne knits glass to create sculptures that are both cozy and fragile

December 7, 2015 by  
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Sprawling Dallas home is built from 14 shipping containers

April 7, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Sprawling Dallas home is built from 14 shipping containers Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 14 shipping container home , 14 shipping containers , corrugated steel ceiling , Dallas , Dallas shipping container home , M Gooden Design , maple floors , Old Lake Highlands , repurposed shipping containers , shipping container home , shipping container house , texas , White Rock Lake

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Sprawling Dallas home is built from 14 shipping containers

How to Spice Up a Shipping Container Home

August 12, 2014 by  
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People all over the world are looking for cheap, alternative housing, and recycled shipping containers are starting to become ever more popular; not just homes but also for all sorts of structures . The average shipping container is a very versatile thing, and they can be easily connected together to make many different shapes and sizes of buildings, somewhat like constructing a building with giant Lego bricks. If you’re looking for an environmentally friendly option to build your new family home or business office, then using modified shipping containers could be the perfect choice for you. Read the rest of How to Spice Up a Shipping Container Home Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ‘Container House , building permits , container home , container homes , Prefab , Recycled Materials , shipping container , shipping container home , shipping container house , shipping container houses , shipping containers , solar panels , summer

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Utah’s Sarah House Project Transforms Shipping Containers into Affordable Homes

May 2, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Utah’s Sarah House Project Transforms Shipping Containers into Affordable Homes Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , Jeffrey White , Salt Lake City affordable housing , Sarah House Project , shipping container home , sustainable design        

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