Shigeru Ban designs 20,000 homes for severely overcrowded refugee camp in Kenya

July 21, 2017 by  
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World-renowned architect, Shigeru Ban , is taking his talents to those who need it most. Working in collaboration with UN-Habitat, the UN agency that focuses on sustainable development , the 2014 Pritzker Prize recipient designed a prototype for some 20,000 new homes for refugees in Kenya’s Kalobeyei Refugee Settlement . True to form, Ban promotes the use of locally-sourced, sustainable materials in the shelter design. The Kalobeyei Refugee Settlement is currently home to almost 37,000 refugees, 17,000 of whom arrived in the first half of 2017 alone. This continuous influx of inhabitants is expected to increase over the next few months, putting the settlement, which has a capacity of 45,000, in a severely precarious situation. Related: 10 groundbreaking designs by Shigeru Ban that changed our ideas about architecture Ban is well-known for his dedication to humanitarian construction, having built various refugee and crisis shelters around the world, namely Rwanda, Italy, and Nepal. Ban is also known for his work with sustainable and locally-sourced materials, a trait that will be essential in the Kenyan camp. On a recent trip to the settlement, Ban highlighted the importance of using local construction techniques and sustainable materials , “The key thing will be to design and construct shelter where no or little technical supervision is required, and use materials that are locally available and eco-friendly. It’s important that the houses can be easily maintained by inhabitants.” The plan calls for Ban’s shelter design to be used initially as a prototype for 20 shelters. After a test period, the design, if successful, will be used to replace some of the camp’s deteriorating structures. + Shigeru Ban Via Archdaily Images via UNHCR

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Shigeru Ban designs 20,000 homes for severely overcrowded refugee camp in Kenya

10 groundbreaking designs by Shigeru Ban that changed our ideas about architecture

May 8, 2017 by  
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Shigeru Ban, one of Inhabitat’s favorite architects , is renowned for his disaster relief design and his ingenious use of lightweight, unconventional, and environmentally responsible materials — in particular, paper and bamboo. His signature water-proof and fire-proof paper tube architecture is iconic around the world. In recognition for his inspiring work, Ban was named the 2014 winner of the prestigious Pritzker Prize . A leader for humanitarian architecture and experimental design, Shigeru Ban said of his accolade: “Receiving this prize is a great honor, and with it, I must be careful. I must continue to listen to the people I work for, in my private residential commissions and in my disaster relief work. I see this prize as encouragement for me to keep doing what I am doing – not to change what I am doing, but to grow.” We’ve rounded up some of our favorite projects by the accomplished Japanese architect, click below to see some of his most inspiring work. Shigeru Ban designed, pro-bono, this stunning temporary Cardboard Cathedral for Christchurch following a devastating earthquake in 2011. Built with his signature paper-tubes, the transitional church can hold up to 700 people and is built to last 50 years. Centre Pompidou-Metz in Metz, France The curvaceous Centre Pompidou-Metz is an extension of the Pompidou arts center of Paris. Its undulating roof made up of a hexagonal pattern was inspired by the woven structure of a Chinese hat that Shigeru Ban found in Paris. Curtain Wall House in Tokyo, Japan One of Ban’s most iconic works, the Curtain Wall House is a contemporary twist on the traditional Japanese home. Two-story-tall billowing curtains wrap around the perimeter of the house like a cocoon that can be opened or closed to allow transparency between the interior and exterior. Cardboard Bridge over Gardon River, France In another display of paper’s structural might, Ban transformed cardboard tubes and recycled paper-plastic composite into a a bridge spanning the Gardon River in southern France . The temporary masterpiece was created out of 281 cardboard tubes and was strong enough to support 20 people at a time. Paper Church in Kobe, Japan After the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake destroyed the Takatori Church in Kobe, Ban designed a temporary paper-tube church pro-bono. Ten years later, the paper church was deconstructed and donated to a Catholic community in Taiwan, where it served as a place for worship. Onagawa Container Temporary Housing in Onagawa, Japan When a powerful earthquake devastated the Japanese town of Onagawa in 2011, Shigeru Ban was quick to design and install temporary disaster-relief housing built from paper tubes and shipping containers. The lightweight, affordable, and clean design provided fast relief to the earthquake survivors while simultaneously lifting spirits with its dignified design. Paper Partition System, Iteration 4 After the 2011 earthquakes and tsunami in Japan, Ban designed his fourth iteration of the Paper Partition System, which provide privacy in existing emergency shelters . Constructed from paper tubes, white canvas sheets, and safety pins, these pop-up partitions were financed with donations from around the world. Tamedia New Office Building in Zurich, Switzerland Built for the Swiss media company Tamedia in Zurich, this carbon neutral office building was created from interlocking wooden beams without the need for metal joints and glue. The beautiful wooden structure also features a glass facade to fill the interior with light. Post-Tsunami Kirinda Project in Kirinda, Sri Lanka In 2004, Ban designed 100 small homes for Sri Lankan villagers displaced by a tsunami in Kirinda. The tiny homes are built from earth bricks and locally-sourced rubber tree wood. Villa at Sengokubara in Kanagawa, Japan Villa at Sengokubara is a minimalist wooden house that wraps around a teardrop-shaped courtyard. Like in his other architecture works, Ban creates a nearly seamless transition between the interior and exterior spaces. + Shigeru Ban

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10 groundbreaking designs by Shigeru Ban that changed our ideas about architecture

Germany just generated a record 85% of its energy from renewable sources

May 8, 2017 by  
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Germany has outdone itself yet again when it comes to clean energy . From April 30 through May 1, the country set a national record by generating 85% of all its energy needs using renewable wind, solar, biomass, and hydroelectric power. And this isn’t just an anomaly – experts believe that this will be the new normal for Germany by 2030. “Most of Germany’s coal-fired power stations were not even operating on Sunday, April 30th, with renewable sources accounting for 85 per cent of electricity across the country. Nuclear power sources, which are planned to be completely phased out by 2022, were also severely reduced,” said Patrick Graichen of Agora Energiewende Initiative . Related: Google’s Project Sunroof expands to 7 million homes in Germany Germany has worked hard to invest in clean energy sources under Angela Merkel , a vocal supporter of renewable energy. It has paid off. In addition to record-breaking weekends like the one on April 30, more and more energy is coming from renewables. In March, the country average 40% energy from green sources. via Clean Technica images via Flickr ( 1 , 2 )

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Germany just generated a record 85% of its energy from renewable sources

Ingenious cardboard and bamboo emergency shelters by Shigeru Ban pop up in Sydney

March 29, 2017 by  
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Pritzker Prize -winning Japanese architect Shigeru Ban is widely known and respected for his 20 year career in designing groundbreaking buildings from cardboard, paper and other unexpected materials , as well as his humanitarian efforts in designing emergency shelters for natural disasters , such as the Nepal Earthquake and the tsunami which hit Southeast Asia . To celebrate the architect’s long dedication to humanitarian design, two of his signature disaster relief shelters have been erected in the Courtyard Garden of Sydney’s Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation (SCAF). Although disaster housing design has advanced by leaps and bounds due to the burgeoning refugee crises, Ban has made a long career of building structures out of locally-sourced and recycled materials – including cardboard tubes, bamboo and recycled milk crates. The structures currently on display at the SCAF are two of his signature designs made of cardboard. The first was designed for the 1995 Kobe earthquake and is constructed from vertical rows of cardboard tubes. The second design, which was made after the 2016 Ecuador earthquake , also has a cardboard frame, but is clad in bamboo. Related: Shigeru Ban will reuse earthquake rubble to build Nepal relief shelters In addition to the two shelters on display in the courtyard, visitors can also see scales of the architect’s additional work on the interior. The exhibit includes some of Ban’s most well-known designs including the amazing Cardboard Cathedral built in Christchurch, New Zealand in 2013. Although Ban has a diverse architectural profile, affordable disaster shelters will always be what drives his inspiration: “Architects mostly work for privileged people, people who have money and power,” he explains. “Power and money are invisible, so people hire us to visualize their power and money by making monumental architecture. I love to make monuments, too, but I thought perhaps we can use our experience and knowledge more for the general public, even for those who have lost their houses in natural disasters.’” + Shigeru Ban Architects Photography by Brett Boardman, courtesy of the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation

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Ingenious cardboard and bamboo emergency shelters by Shigeru Ban pop up in Sydney

Giants of Japanese architecture design prototypes for houses of the future

August 8, 2016 by  
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Shigeru Ban ‘s Open House with Condensed Core proposes that plumbing water and waste could be funneled through the ceiling instead of floors to provide more organizational flexibility. Floor-to-ceiling windows open outwards at a right angle as a space-saving solution. Sou Fujimoto conceived a housing model named Rental Space Tower, which provides shared living spaces. The “pixelated” structure was built in collaboration with real estate company Daito Trust Construction. Related: Amazing Green-Walled Japanese Bathroom Answers Nature’s Call Atelier Bow Wow teamed up with Japanese design brand Muji to build Tanada Terrace Office. The building is a prototype for paddy field housing and references traditional structural solutions such as stilted timber construction. This solution would function as a workspace for digital nomads. Another model addressing the trend of nomadic living is the temporary Nomad House, designed by Suppose Design Office founders Makoto Tanijiri and Ai Yoshida. Kengo Kuma designed the venue and came up with a series of solar-powered tents named Grand Third Living Room. Latticed timber walkways connect all the exhibits, including the Checkerboard Water Garden designed by Kuma himself. One of the houses- Go Hasegawa ‘s Yoshino-Sugi Cedar House-will be transported to the town of Yoshino after the exhibition closes and listed on Airbnb. Inside-Out/Furniture-Room, designed by architect Jun Igarashi and furniture designer Taiji Fujimori for toilet manufacturer Toto and window company YKK AP, has built-in furniture placed in volumes that radially branch out from a central core. Visitors of the One Family Under a Wireless Roof can use VR headsets to experience how families living apart communicate and stay in touch, while Hiragana-no Spiral House, designed by Yuko Nagayama for Panasonic, features a spiraling screen for watching films. Several other projects address different aspects of modern living and housing trends, often using the latest technology to educate visitors and allow them to experience space. + House Vision 2 Via Dezeen

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Giants of Japanese architecture design prototypes for houses of the future

Shigeru Ban transforms 90,000 eye shadow containers into a glittering wave at the Venice Biennale

May 21, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Shigeru Ban transforms 90,000 eye shadow containers into a glittering wave at the Venice Biennale Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , Palazzo Pisani , recycled makeup case , Reverberation Pavilion of Light and Sound , shigeru ban , Shiseido , sustainable design , Venice Biennale

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Shigeru Ban transforms 90,000 eye shadow containers into a glittering wave at the Venice Biennale

Shigeru Ban announces plans to build emergency shelters in Nepal

May 8, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Shigeru Ban announces plans to build emergency shelters in Nepal Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: disaster relief design , disaster relief shelters , emergency shelters , Nepal earthquake shelters , paper tubes , shigeru ban , Shigeru Ban Architects , Volunteer Architects Network

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Shigeru Ban announces plans to build emergency shelters in Nepal

7 amazing projects by 2015 Pritzker Prize laureate Frei Otto

March 11, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of 7 amazing projects by 2015 Pritzker Prize laureate Frei Otto Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 1967 Expo , 1972 Munich Olympic Stadium , 2015 Pritzker Prize , City in the Arctic , Diplomatic Club Heart Tent , Frei Otto , Japanese Pavilion , Jorg Gribl , Mannheim , Multihalle , Munich Zoo Aviary , paper pavilion , Pritzker Prize , Pritzker Prize Laureate , shigeru ban , Ted Happold

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7 amazing projects by 2015 Pritzker Prize laureate Frei Otto

Tour 6 of New York City’s Most Incredible New Design Destinations

October 8, 2014 by  
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October marks New York City’s annual celebration of architecture and design, and Inhabitat is kicking the event off with a virtual tour of six of the city’s most inspiring design destinations. We recently got to experience some of NYC’s most incredible architecture on the curated Driven by Design tour presented by Architectural Digest and Cadillac , and we’re going to share our tour virtually with you! From the powerful September 11 Memorial and Museum to Shigeru Ban’s elegant Cast Iron House to a bird’s eye view of Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub , come along with us as we share some of New York City’s most groundbreaking and exciting new architecture. Read the rest of Tour 6 of New York City’s Most Incredible New Design Destinations Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 1 wtc , 911 memorial , cadillac , cast iron house , drivenbydesign , michael arad , neue house , neuehouse , nyc architecture , nyc design , oculus , oculus transportation hub , one world trade center , santiago calatrava , september 11 memorial , september 11 memorial museum , shigeru ban , world trade center , world trade center transportation hub

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Tour 6 of New York City’s Most Incredible New Design Destinations

Contour Crafting Wins NASA Prize For Revolutionary 3D Printed Building Tech

October 8, 2014 by  
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Contour Crafting just won a major design prize for its ability to 3D print large-scale structures from computer-aided design (CAD) files. Berokh Kohshnevis ‘ “robotic building construction” system can print entire buildings quickly and efficiently, and it has the potential to provide reliable housing in post-disaster situations. The technology won the grand prize in the 2014 Create The Future Design Contest hosted by NASA Tech Briefs , and Contour Crafting will receive $20,000 and a special feature in the magazine. Read the rest of Contour Crafting Wins NASA Prize For Revolutionary 3D Printed Building Tech Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D printing , Architecture , berokh kohshnevis , building , computer , construction , contour crafting , Design , Disaster Relief , housing , nasa tech briefs , Technology , USC

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Contour Crafting Wins NASA Prize For Revolutionary 3D Printed Building Tech

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