Frank Lloyd Wright architecture school grad built this beautiful desert shelter for $2K

May 17, 2017 by  
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Students at The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture, Taliesin West have erected small sleeping shelters on the school’s Arizona desert property in for decades, hearkening back to the early days of the school, when young architects resided in tents as they built the permanent building. Chilean architect Jaime Inostroza just raised his own tiny shelter, and – in keeping with the famous architect’s principles – it is meant to “respond to the landscape of the Sonora desert .” Inostroza named his shelter Atalaya, which means the crow’s nest of a ship, wherein crew members can glimpse the horizon. In his design statement, Inostroza said he wanted to build a sleeping shelter that would let him “dwell within the horizon of the Alameda of the Palos Verdes.” Atalaya is 12 feet tall, the same height as many of the surrounding trees. Related: Taliesin West students built protective desert shelters using mostly local materials With just a $2,000 budget from the school – and honoring Wright’s principles of sustainable design – Inostroza incorporated local stones into his shelter, and reused an old concrete pad resting on the site as a plinth for his new structure. Western red-cedar comprises the wooden parts of the shelter, a type Inostroza chose because it can last for 25 years and was more beautiful than another type of wood he could have picked such as pine. A wall-stair provides access to a small sleeping chamber. Fabric panels intended to amplify the surrounding desert colors cover Atalaya. Inostroza also considered light and the way it changes daily in the desert; he said the site of his sleeping shelter “becomes a distiller of the light” at sunset. He went through several designs before he settled on one, which happened to be the simplest. He told azcentral.com, “I’ve learned to always be asking: What is the essence? What is here? You don’t want to impose yourself on the site, you want to exalt what is already there.” Via ArchDaily , Curbed , and azcentral.com Images © Andrew Pielage /via ArchDaily

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Frank Lloyd Wright architecture school grad built this beautiful desert shelter for $2K

Sleek Swiss-designed electric supercar takes on Tesla

May 17, 2017 by  
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Tesla’s got some new competition from Switzerland. Inspired in design by classic Italian supercars , the Elextra will be hand-built in Germany, though its maker plans to limit production to 100 pieces to ensure exclusivity. The all- electric vehicle can reach 62 miles per hour from zero in a snappy 2.3 seconds, and travels nearly 400 miles on a single charge. The Elextra is meant to redefine supercars, while drawing on modern technology to offer a clean ride. It is constructed with carbon fiber and boasts a dual motor electric drivetrain. The output power of the twin motors is 680 horsepower. The Elextra can reach 155 miles per hour, and has a total range of 373 miles. That rapid speed of zero to 62 miles per hour in 2.3 seconds is just faster than the Tesla Model S P100D. Related: Singapore’s Vanda Electric just unveiled a 1,500 horsepower electric supercar On the Elextra website, CEO Robert Palm of Classic Factory , which is behind the Elextra, said, “The idea behind Elextra is to combine pure lines reminding of the most exciting Italian supercars of the past, whilst being resolutely forward-thinking thanks to its low, sleek, and beautiful design , paired with today’s most advanced technology.” New Atlas pointed out hints of Ferrari-Lamborghini in the car’s wedge nose. A large greenhouse and signature V on the vehicle’s roof add flair. Yet the Elextra isn’t all style over function – it still has four seats and four doors so a whole family could go for a spin. New Atlas compared the amount of seating to the old Lamborghini Espada, which offered the sports car feel but had four seats inside. While designed in Switzerland, the cars will be built near Stuttgart, Germany. The company has not yet said how much the car will cost, but that they will be releasing more details this year. + Elextra Via New Atlas and Elextra Images via Elextra

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Taliesin West students built protective desert shelters using mostly local materials

June 14, 2016 by  
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The project was initially conceived as individual exercises where Daniel Chapman, Mark-Thomas Cordova, Jaime Inostroza, Dylan Kessler, Pablo Moncayo, Natasha Vemulkonda, and Pierre Verbruggen were to design and build their own temporary shelters . The plan changed due to harsh desert conditions, and the students, guided by their instructor David Tapias, ended up designing a collective shelter. Related: Stunning Prefab by the School of Frank Lloyd Wright The students took only 12 weeks to build their designs, which comprise two shelters and a gathering space, using materials found on-site as well as inexpensive materials sourced from warehouses. Future students will use the shelters during their time at Taliesin West  and transform and document them on the little maps website. + Taliesin – Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture + Little Shelters Via Archdaily Photos by Nathan Rist

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Taliesin West students built protective desert shelters using mostly local materials

Scotland reaches gutsy emissions reduction goal six years early

June 14, 2016 by  
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Scotland has made great strides towards meeting its 2020 greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals. Their goal was to reduce emissions by 42 percent by 2020. This week, the Scottish government announced in a press release that the country passed the goal in 2014, when they achieved “a reduction of 45.8 percent.” Climate change secretary Roseanna Cunningham said between 1990 and 2014, emissions fell by close to 46 percent. Emissions in the rest of the UK since 1990 only fell by 33 percent. Cunningham suggested that individuals turning down the heat may have contributed to the reduction. Related: 57% of Scotland’s energy came from renewables in 2015 Others said the government still needs to step up their commitment to cutting greenhouse gas emissions. Stop Climate Chaos Scotland spokesperson Jim Densham told The Guardian while it was good the goal has already been reached, showing people don’t have to sacrifice comfort drastically to combat climate change, the government still needs to “lead with the big policies for major emission reductions.” According to Densham, emissions from the transportation sector remain at the same levels as 1990, and in the housing sector, emissions have only been reduced by 1 percent. He said Scotland was able to reach the 42 percent target due to a warmer 2014 winter, heavy industry loss, a “changing share of European emissions credits,” and policies. Green Party Parliament member Mark Ruskell said if the government hopes to set greater targets for 2020, they need to address “home energy efficiency” and fuel poverty. They also need “far more ambitious” transportation policies. Ruskell said to The Guardian, “The real test of action on climate change isn’t how figures get fudged from year to year; it’s whether people across Scotland have real choices to live in warm, efficient homes or a transport system fit for the 21st century. That requires funding and action from the Scottish government.” According to the Scottish government, the target for 2050 is an 80 percent reduction in emissions. Cunningham said since the country has already met its 2020 goal, it will likely pursue more ambitious goals in legislation . Via The Guardian Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Scotland reaches gutsy emissions reduction goal six years early

Transforming veil shields UAE medical center from thermal fluctuations

June 14, 2016 by  
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This unusual medical center planned for Al Ain, the fourth largest city in the United Arab Emirates , includes a large tower wrapped in a transforming veil that helps balance the region’s dramatic thermal fluctuations. Architecture firm Philippe Barriere Collective (PB+Co) designed the development as a state-of-the-art combination of Western and alternative medicine , nature preservation practices and technology. The Al Ain municipality wanted to create an iconic project that would embody the idea of progress in environmental sciences, green technology and medical treatment deeply connected to nature. The resulting design includes a Chelation Clinic, Integrated Dental Domes, a Healing Clinic and individual bungalows as patients’ private residences. Related: How design humanizes patients’ experience at the St Charles Bend Cancer Center The complex will overlook Al Ain Lake, the shores of which are planted with a variety of species that attract birds, fish, and reptiles, among other animals, and acts as a model of biodiversity. This area is also meant to be used for patient rehabilitation and healing. The tower is wrapped in a skin-like layer that expands and contracts to control temperature and shading by creating an internal buffer air zone that can increase in size or retract. + Philippe Barriere Collective (PB+Co) Via v2com

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Transforming veil shields UAE medical center from thermal fluctuations

Hey Gardeners! Consider Planting an Extra Row for the Hungry This Year

March 28, 2014 by  
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It’s estimated that one in eight people suffers from hunger and malnutrition, which means that all around the world, millions of people—including children— go hungry each and every day . That means that on an average crowded morning bus, there may be four or five people who won’t have enough to eat that day. In a schoolyard full of kids… well, one is too many, but it’s likely that many of them are too hungry to focus on their assignments. There is a way that the average person can help to ameliorate this, and that’s by simply growing a little bit extra in the family garden. Read the rest of Hey Gardeners! Consider Planting an Extra Row for the Hungry This Year Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Charities , Charity , feed the hungry , garden , Gardening , gardens , Grow a row , grow food for the hungry , homeless , hunger , hungry , plant a row , SEED , seeds , shelters , vegetable garden , vegetables        

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Hey Gardeners! Consider Planting an Extra Row for the Hungry This Year

Designer Robert DuGrenier Makes Hand-Blown Glass Shells for Hermit Crabs

July 31, 2012 by  
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Glass blower Robert DuGrenier has been blowing glass for over 30 years, but for the last 15 he has been creating hand-blown glass terrarium sculptures to house living art compositions for about 50 hermit crabs (or “Crabitats,” as we’ve taken to calling them). Now, DuGrenier is offering his glass shells up for sale, so if you are a hermit crab lover then this is for you! Read the rest of Designer Robert DuGrenier Makes Hand-Blown Glass Shells for Hermit Crabs Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: crabitats , glass , glass blowing , hermit crabs , marine life , robert dugrenier , shelters

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Designer Robert DuGrenier Makes Hand-Blown Glass Shells for Hermit Crabs

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