"Microplastics have been found in mussels everywhere scientists have looked"

December 20, 2017 by  
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Mussels might serve as a global “bioindicator of microplastic pollution ,” Chinese researchers suggested last year, as the creatures remain in the same area and reside on the seabed where plastic ends up. And a new study from the Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) uncovered plastic in 76.6 percent of individual blue mussels they tested. Reuters pointed to other surveys where researchers found microplastics in mussels near China, Belgium, Britain, Canada, and Chile. NIVA Researcher Amy Lusher told Reuters, “Microplastics have been found in mussels everywhere scientists have looked.” The new NIVA research found on average 1.8 pieces of microplastic in mollusks near Norway, while and mussels living in waters thought to be pristine in the Arctic actually had the greatest amount of plastic among any of the creatures tested near the Norwegian coast. Lusher said ocean currents and winds from American and Europe may be sweeping plastic north, where it might then swirl in the Arctic Ocean. Related: Plankton Pundit video shows exact moment plastic enters the food chain Scientists aren’t quite sure how microplastics in marine life will impact humans that consume them, but think you’d have to eat a whole lot of shellfish to be at risk. Microplastics expert and Plymouth University professor Richard Thompson told Reuters of the global discoveries, “It’s a warning signal that we need to do something about reducing the input of plastic to the ocean. It’s a cause for concern at the moment rather than an alarm story for human consumption.” You can check out the NIVA report here . Via Reuters and Norwegian Institute for Water Research Images via Janne Kim Gitmark, NIVA and NIVA

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"Microplastics have been found in mussels everywhere scientists have looked"

Scientists find first contagious cancer transmissible between species

June 30, 2016 by  
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Scientists have seen contagious cancer before, in Tasmanian devils, in dogs, and in soft-shell clams in Prince Edward Island. Now, researchers are adding one more occurrence to the list: a contagious, leukemia-like disease that appears to be widespread among shellfish with hinged shells, called bivalves, such as clams, mussels, and cockles. Researchers discovered evidence, for the first time ever, that this particular disease can spread between species , making it slightly more terrifying. A team of Spanish scientists initially found the cancerous phenomenon in shellfish off the coast of Galicia, Spain but other researchers working in Canada have also observed the contagious disease. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ir5H-yZONg8 Scientists learned that the disease was spreading among ocean creatures  belonging to related, but different species after a genetic analysis of the cancer cells. Cancer originates from mutated cells but are genetically similar to the host, so analyzing the cancer cells helped researchers determine their origin. So far, the disease has been found in mussels off the coast of British Columbia and in cockles and golden carpet shell clams in Spain, and it is very similar to a disease soft-shell clams in Prince Edward Island have suffered. Related: Clams could clean up oil spills without chemicals This discovery of a transmissible cancer is probably just the beginning, according to study coauthor Jim Sherry, an Environment Canada scientist based in Burlington, Ontario. “It may be more widespread in nature than we know,” he said. Instead of being very similar to the genetic makeup of their host, cancer cells of this variety are “wildly different from the host,” according to lead author Stephen Goff, a professor of microbiology at Columbia University. The cancer cells they found in golden carpet shell clams had originated in the pullet carpet shell, a related species of shellfish . “This had to be a case of cross-species transmission,” Goff said. Luckily, the scientists think the contagious cancer is a rare occurrence, and isn’t likely to spread to unrelated species. The study, published in the journal Nature , describes the nature of the contagious cancer in shellfish in Spain, Canada, and the northern United States. Via CBC Images via CUMC

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Scientists find first contagious cancer transmissible between species

Crowdfunded 3D Ocean Farms Could Help Restore the Health of the Seas

July 10, 2013 by  
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The world’s oceans are experiencing a tough time. Overfishing , acidification from climate change, pollution , and dead zones have all become major challenges facing the health of aquatic ecosystems around the globe. While the problems may seem as massive, ocean farmer Brendan Smith has an innovative solution that takes advantage of nature’s proclivity to heal itself. Through a Kickstarter campaign , he is proposing using blue-green algae and shellfish to help restore marine habitats. Taking advantage of the entire water column, these 3D farms could assist in capturing carbon, produce healthy and local foods, create biodiversity, and provide a source for biofuel. Read the rest of Crowdfunded 3D Ocean Farms Could Help Restore the Health of the Seas Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d farm , algae , biofuel , blue-green economy , brendan smith , carbon , Kelp , kickstarter , long island sound , Maine , New York. , nitrogen , ocean , Pollution , shellfish , thimble island oyster company , us department of energy , washington        

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Crowdfunded 3D Ocean Farms Could Help Restore the Health of the Seas

Amazing Botanical Sculptures Bring Fairytale Landscapes to Life in Montréal

July 10, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Amazing Botanical Sculptures Bring Fairytale Landscapes to Life in Montréal Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “botanical garden” , 2013 Mosaïcultures Internationales de Montréal (MIM) , botanical art , botanical garden Australia , Gardening , horticulture , Montreal Botanical Garden , outdoor exhibition Montreal , plant art , plant exhibition , plant sculptures , plant species        

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How can I reuse or recycle dressed crab shells?

April 6, 2010 by  
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I hope everyone had a great Easter weekend – we don’t celebrate Easter but we do celebrate long weekends so had a great few days off 😉 On Sunday, we went to the Leeds Farmers Market (held on the 1st & 3rd Sundays of each month in the outside market bit) and amongst the other yummables, I got some dressed crabs one of the Whitby fish guys – mmm, meat in served its own carcass (or at least, the carcass of its prettiest unlucky fellow species-mate). They’ve already been reused once already as a kooky serving dish but any ideas for reuses or recycling ideas now? I suspect there will be some overlap with mussel shells – and like with those, there will be different answers for people who only have them occasionally (like me) and people who have a lot to get rid of regularly (like restaurants).

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How can I reuse or recycle dressed crab shells?

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