Cypress home embedded in the landscape lets rainwater flow underneath

May 17, 2017 by  
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O’Neill Rose Architects designed a home for a nature loving couple that maximizes the experience of the outdoors. Located in the countryside of Sheffield, Massachusetts, the Undermountain home covers a spacious 3,000 square feet across a linear footprint. The elevated home also allows rainwater to flow underneath through a boulder-strewn rain garden and out to the meadow beyond. Built for a couple who wanted a home where they could age in place, Undermountain was conceived as a single-story building so that the occupants could live comfortably without fear of future mobility issues. To mitigate slope changes on site, the long and rectangular building is anchored into a hill on one side, while stone blocks support the other end above marshy wetland . A boulder-strewn rain garden occupies the gap between the stone blocks. Related: Beautiful Maine home uses passive solar principles to achieve near net-zero energy Inspired by the rural vernacular, Undermountain is clad in vertical strips of ebony-stained cypress and punctuated with large windows that frame key vistas. Rural inspiration and cypress can also be found in the interior, which is contemporary with clean lines and light-filled spaces. The addition of a screened porch allows enjoyment of the outdoors year-round. + O’Neill Rose Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Michael Moran

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Cypress home embedded in the landscape lets rainwater flow underneath

WaterMade Sets Up Sustainable Water Projects in Africa Funded by Sales of Recycled Handmade Ugandan Jewelry

October 15, 2014 by  
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UK-based nonprofit WaterMade is a social enterprise that raises money for water projects across East Africa from sales of jewelry handmade from recycled materials by women’s groups in Kampala, Uganda. Founded by the Sheffield water charity The Long Well Walk , the student-run WaterMade nonprofit operates a number of different projects and helps provide a sustainable income to local communities. Funds from WaterMade sales also support the charity group ‘ Kid’s Clubs Kampala ,’ which creates education and community programs to help lift Ugandan children out of poverty. + WaterMade The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Charity , handmade jewelry , kids club kampala , reader submitted content , Recycled Materials , sheffield , the long well walk , Uganda , ugandan jewelry , water charity , water projects , Watermade

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WaterMade Sets Up Sustainable Water Projects in Africa Funded by Sales of Recycled Handmade Ugandan Jewelry

U.K. Testing First Tram-Train Hybrid in Sheffield

February 7, 2014 by  
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The United Kingdom ‘s first tram-train hybrid is currently being installed in Sheffield, England , and when it’s completed in 2016 the public transit line will provide a seamless transition from the national railway tracks to the existing city tracks of the Sheffield SuperTram . According to Wired , The eight-mile commuter rail line runs from suburban Rotherham Parkgate to Sheffield city center, and the $98 million (£60 million) pilot project will test the system to see if it will work in the rest of the U.K. Read the rest of U.K. Testing First Tram-Train Hybrid in Sheffield Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: heavy rail , hybrid , Karlsruhe model , light trail , sheffield , special wheels , train , tram , tram-train , trolley-train , UK        

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U.K. Testing First Tram-Train Hybrid in Sheffield

Fifth Fence Farm Creates Cozy, Eco Chic Wool Throws

February 6, 2014 by  
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Michael and Vera brought their first lambs home in 2012, and were instantly enamored. Today, they operate Fifth Fence Farm in Charlotte, Vermont, and produce small-batch wool throws in classic plaited twill and herringbone patterns. Their flock of sixteen sheep are fed on grass, minerals and kelp and grow full, radiant fleeces. Fifth Fence Farm throws are available in four patterns, all named for ewes in the flock: Mona, Iris, Elba and Sparrow. Read the rest of Fifth Fence Farm Creates Cozy, Eco Chic Wool Throws Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: charlotte , eco-friendly fabrics , Fifth Fence Farm , green design , green interiors , sustainable design , sustainable housewares , Sustainable Interiors , sustainable wool , vermont        

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Fifth Fence Farm Creates Cozy, Eco Chic Wool Throws

New CatClo Laundry Additive Could Create Air-Purifying Clothes to Reduce Pollution

October 3, 2012 by  
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The University of Sheffield has collaborated with the London College of Fashion and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to develop a revolutionary liquid laundry additive called ‘CatClo’ , which contains microscopic pollution-eating particles. The team behind the product say that the additive can be washed into clothes and would allow the wearer to “purify the air as they move.” If everything goes to plan, CatClo’s creators hope that the product will be made commercially available within the next two years. It really is an innovative concept – clothes are simply washed in the additive once, allowing nanoparticles of titanium dioxide to grip onto the fabrics very tightly. When these particles come into contact with nitrogen oxides in the air, they react with the pollutants and oxides to make them completely odorless and colorless. The pollutants are then removed harmlessly when the item of clothing is next washed, if they haven’t already been dissipated harmlessly with sweat. CatClo itself is also completely harmless and the wearer would not even notice it if they were wearing it. It is estimated that a single person wearing clothes treated with CatClo would be able to remove around 5g of nitrogen oxides from the air over the course of an average day. This is roughly the equivalent produced each day by an average family car. By removing such nitrogen oxides from the air, CatClo-treated clothes would benefit those that suffer from respiratory ailments as they would create cleaner air as they move around. Professor Tony Ryan OBE of the University of Sheffield , who has co-led the project along with Professor Helen Storey MBE from London College of Fashion, said: “It’s the action of daylight on the nanoparticles that makes them function in this way. The development of the additive is just one of the advances we’re making in the field of photocatalytic materials – materials that, in the presence of light, catalyse chemical reactions. Through CatClo, we aim to turn clothes into a catalytic surface to purify air.” “If thousands of people in a typical town used the additive, the result would be a significant improvement in local air quality”, says Professor Ryan. “This additive creates the potential for community action to deliver a real environmental benefit that could actually help to cut disease and save lives. In Sheffield, for instance, if everyone washed their clothes in the additive, there would be no pollution problem caused by nitrogen oxides at all. + University of Sheffield via Eclipse Magazine

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New CatClo Laundry Additive Could Create Air-Purifying Clothes to Reduce Pollution

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