Tesla hit with $86K fine for violating emission standards in California

April 4, 2019 by  
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Tesla just had to shell out thousands of dollars after losing a lawsuit over air pollution. The car company was hit with an $86,000 fine for violating emission standards in a facility based in Fremont, California . The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) led the charge against Tesla , inspecting the manufacturing site with help from the Department of Toxic Substances Control and Bay Area Air Quality Management. The organizations found that Tesla failed to properly handle waste that should have been deemed toxic. Related: Greenhouse gas emissions rose during 2018 after three year decline According to Gizmodo , Tesla is now following proper protocols in the disposal of toxic waste. In the settlement, the car company agreed to pay off a $31,000 fine and purchase new equipment for local firefighters worth around $55,000. In total, Tesla forked over around $86,000 in fines. “The company has now corrected those violations and has provided training in hazardous waste management to more than 1,100 paint shop workers, technicians and supervisors,” the EPA explained. The settlement further revealed that Tesla failed to dispose of solvents and paints that were flammable. This includes not labeling waste and failing to properly secure containers. The company also did not adequately store and label waste that was toxic in nature. The EPA marked  Tesla for not having enough space in waste management areas as well. This is unfortunately not the first time Tesla has faced environmental violations. In 2010, the company received a $275,000 fine because of certification issues with the Tesla Roadster. Three years later, Tesla payed a $71,000 fine, because a few workers came in contact with molten aluminum. In 2019, the EPA issued the company a $29,000 fine for violating safety standards and a $139,000 fine for breaking pollution  laws. Because of the ongoing health and safety violations, the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health just labeled Tesla among the most dangerous places to work in the United States. Although the company continues to face public scrutiny over its workplace standards, especially when it comes to toxic waste and air pollution , it refuses to allow workers to unionize. Via Gizmodo Image via FreePhotos

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Tesla hit with $86K fine for violating emission standards in California

Florida power company scraps nuclear project, will pursue solar power instead

September 1, 2017 by  
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A controversial nuclear project won’t be moving forward in Florida . Power company Duke Energy Florida filed a proposed settlement agreement with the Florida Public Service Commission (FPSC) that would end the Levy Nuclear Project – which customers were paying for before it was even begun – and prioritize grid modernization and solar energy . Part of the settlement includes a four-year plan to install 700 megawatts (MW) of solar in western Florida. Ratepayers have forked over around $800 million for the Levy Nuclear Project, which was first proposed in 2008. In 2013, Duke Energy Florida cancelled construction and engineering agreements, although they said they hoped to return to the project. The Levy plant would have offered 2.2 gigawatts of power. $150 million remained in costs, which the company said they would have recovered via rates, but under the settlement customers won’t have to pay more money for the nuclear project that never got far off the ground. Related: Abandoned nuclear power plant given new life as a solar farm Under the revised settlement, the company would invest in grid modernization efforts like smart meters and as much as 50 MW of battery storage . They’d install over 500 electric vehicle charging stations. They also plan to put in 700 MW of solar power, including the 74.9 MW Hamilton Solar Plant, which they hope to begin building in early 2018. The solar plant, the company’s sixth, could power over 20,000 homes. Residential customers could see their average monthly bill cut by $2.50, according to Tampa Bay Times, although they won’t be reimbursed for the $800 million. 1.8 million customers receive power from Duke Energy Florida, and the settlement means their bills might go up a little bit less than the company recently forecast, according to Tampa Bay Times. Duke filed for a 8.5 percent increase from the present rate last week, which under the new settlement would be a 4.6 percent increase. Duke Energy Florida said in a statement they anticipated a decision from the FPSC by December. Via Ars Technica , Tampa Bay Times , and Duke Energy Florida Images via NASA and Duke Energy Facebook

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Florida power company scraps nuclear project, will pursue solar power instead

Extraordinary ‘British Pompeii’ settlement was preserved in water for 3,000 years

July 20, 2016 by  
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The Cambridge Archaeological Unit is excavating Must Farm , a well-preserved British site that has provided a glimpse into daily life during the Bronze Age. Described as ‘ British Pompeii ,’ Must Farm was destroyed quickly and its buildings sank into water, where the settlement was preserved for the next 3,000 years or so. Now archaeologists are finding everything from textiles to food to a wheel, and describe the site as home to ” an extraordinarily rich range of good and objects .” The excavation at Must Farm is funded by Forterra and Historic England and supported by the University of Cambridge . Like Pompeii, the story of the Must Farm inhabitants ends in tragedy. Because the site is so well-preserved, archaeologists have many clues to piece together what likely happened. Related: UK resident accidentally discovers ancient Anglo-Saxon settlement The Must Farm locals built round homes on stilts above a river. There were about 10 of these wooden homes, and about 30 people lived there. Archaeologists can tell that the oak trees utilized in the homes were cut down in the winter, and the next summer, the entire settlement burned down rapidly in an inferno. Forensic research appears to indicate the fire may have been set on purpose before the residents were able to truly establish their settlement. The remains of the houses and the possessions that fell into the river and river silt were preserved in the fens. It appears any survivors may have had to flee given how many possessions were left behind. Archaeologists have found axes, spears, 60 beads (that could have come from Turkey or Syria), linen fragments, and even footprints. There were no skeletons other than a skull that had likely been hung as a trophy on one of the homes. Site manager Mark Knight told CNN, “I think I’ve found a landscape that has a story; a landscape that hasn’t been described before, hasn’t been visited before. We are the first people to explore it.” Via CNN Images via Must Farm Archaeology Facebook

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Extraordinary ‘British Pompeii’ settlement was preserved in water for 3,000 years

BREAKING: BP will pay a record $18.7 billion to settle 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill claims

July 2, 2015 by  
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BP has finally agreed to settle all federal and state claims over the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill with a record $18.7 billion payment—the largest environmental fine in U.S. history. With an estimated 210 million gallons of oil discharged into the Gulf of Mexico, the 2010 environmental disaster is the biggest offshore oil spill in American history, claiming 11 worker lives and causing extensive and ongoing damage to wildlife, human health, and the economy. BP’s settlement is the “largest settlement with a single entity in American history,” according to U.S. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch. If approved by a judge, the settlement will bring BP’s total spending over the oil spill to $53.8 billion. Via Wall Street Journal Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2010 deepwater horizon oil spill , BP , BP payout , BP settlement , deepwater horizon , Deepwater Horizon settlement , environmental destruction , largest environmental payout in history

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BREAKING: BP will pay a record $18.7 billion to settle 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill claims

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