A run-down property in Portugal gets a playful renovation using a blend of colors and patterns

January 17, 2018 by  
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The inventive  renovation of this house in Ovar, Portugal, balances the past and the present by connecting the main residence with a newer addition using playful patterns and colors. Architect Nelson Resende Arquitecto  turned the crumbling, traditional home into a modern multi-use space with plenty of charm by drawing in light, adding modern finishes and highlighting the original features of the home. The house is located in the city of Ovar in Portugal, on a lot bordering the access road, abutting against the adjacent buildings. The secondary structure and the main house itself are treated distinctly, with the main residence featuring larger rooms. The spaces in the secondary structure are more constrained. Related: Architects convert 150-year-old Lisbon building into an artisanal green studio The architect decided that the main building should house the living areas and common spaces, with the street-facing part of the secondary structure converted into a garage and the inward-facing section reserved for private use, service and storage spaces . The attic in the main building is a multipurpose space bathed in natural light . The architect used beautiful decorative tiles for the facades and wood in the interior, blending traditional design with modern functions. + Nelson Resende Arquitecto Photos by João Morgado

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A run-down property in Portugal gets a playful renovation using a blend of colors and patterns

The majority of the National Park Service board just resigned

January 17, 2018 by  
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The majority of the 12-person National Park System Advisory Board (NPSAB) resigned this week because President Donald Trump’s Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke was unwilling to meet with them, according to NPR . Democrat Tony Knowles, former governor of Alaska, said in a resignation letter “…from all of the events of this past year I have a profound concern that the mission of stewardship, protection, and advancement of our National Parks has been set aside.” The National Park Service (NPS) advisory board was first authorized in 1935, and today more than three-quarters of its members have left their seats. In the January 15 letter Knowles said that he will remain dedicated to the success of America’s national parks, but “For the last year we have stood by waiting for the chance to meet and continue the partnership between the NPSAB and the DOI [Department of the Interior] as prescribed by law. We understand the complexity of transition but our requests to engage have been ignored and the matters on which we wanted to brief the new Department team are clearly not part of its agenda.” Related: Ryan Zinke recommends shrinking two more national monuments Nine board members signed that letter, and all of their terms were set to expire in May. Today a tenth member – whose term doesn’t expire until 2021 – resigned as well. Project Concern International CEO Carolyn Hessler Radelet submitted a similar letter to Zinke. According to The Washington Post , this move means the federal government lacks a functioning body to “designate national historic or natural landmarks.” The publication said it also shows how federal advisory bodies have been marginalized in Trump’s administration . Zinke suspended outside committees back in May of last year for his staff to review their work. Interior spokesperson Heather Swift said boards restarted in an email to The Washington Post earlier this month, but didn’t provide other details. The two people remaining on the board at this time are University of Maryland professor Rita Colwell and Harvard University professor Linda Blimes, who told The Washington Post she didn’t resign as she’s currently conducting research funded by the National Park Foundation and wants to finish. Their terms are up in May. Via NPR and The Washington Post (1 , 2 , 3) Images by Casey Horner on Unsplash , Gage Skidmore on Flickr and NPS

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The majority of the National Park Service board just resigned

Low-Income School in Hong Kong Named ‘Greenest School on Earth’

November 6, 2013 by  
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A low-income school in Hong Kong was just named one of the “ Greenest Schools on Earth ” by the U.S. Green Building Council! Sing Yin Secondary School shows that eco-friendly principles aren’t just for the wealthy elite – the school is decked out with solar panels , green roofs, and wind turbines , and it teaches students the importance of protecting the environment and living sustainably. Read the rest of Low-Income School in Hong Kong Named ‘Greenest School on Earth’ Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , green roof , greenest school on dart , Hong Kong , LED lighting , photovoltaic cells , sing yin school , solar panels , sustainable design , U.S. Green Building Council , world’s greenest school        

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Low-Income School in Hong Kong Named ‘Greenest School on Earth’

Nuclear Plant Near San Andreas Fault Ran for Over a Year With Emergency Systems Disabled

March 18, 2011 by  
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Photo: emdot Flickr, CC 2.0 A common line I’ve been hearing in response to Japan’s ongoing nuclear crisis goes something like this: “Well, this would never happen here — our nuclear plants are designed to shut down in the event of a quake or some other disruption.” Of course, the Fukushima I plant was designed to shut down too, but the tsunami knocked out the secondary power required to kick the emergency system into motion. And while I understand the sentiment, which I suppose is a defense mechanism — few things s… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Nuclear Plant Near San Andreas Fault Ran for Over a Year With Emergency Systems Disabled

9.0 Earthquake Not Enough to Derail Japan’s High Speed Trains

March 18, 2011 by  
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Photo: GanMed64 , Flickr, (CC by 2.0) To say that the earthquake and subsequent tsunami that rocked Japan last week was devastating is an understatement. It wiped entire cities off the map, left a staggering death toll in its wake (though one that would have been much higher were it not for Japan’s strong building laws ), and sparked

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9.0 Earthquake Not Enough to Derail Japan’s High Speed Trains

Congo Rejects UK Bid to Drill for Oil in World’s Only Remaining Mountain Gorilla Habitat

March 18, 2011 by  
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Image: Rachel Cernansky This doesn’t seem a victory so much as common sense, but these days those aren’t mutually exclusive.

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Congo Rejects UK Bid to Drill for Oil in World’s Only Remaining Mountain Gorilla Habitat

New Jersey Bill Proposes To Ban Fracking – Would Be First State To Do So

March 18, 2011 by  
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Some good news/bad news or at least good news/interesting news on fracking , good news first: As TruthOut reports, New Jersey legislators have put forth a bill that would ban fracking in the state, making it the first state in the nation to do so. So far the bill has been approved the New Jersey Senate Environment Committee. Let’s see how far it goes..

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New Jersey Bill Proposes To Ban Fracking – Would Be First State To Do So

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