This waterproof outwear is made with fishing nets and nylon waste

November 11, 2020 by  
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Sisters Marta and Lucia Scarampi have always focused on slow fashion by making each item in the Marta Scarampi clothing line on-demand as orders are received. This avoids excess waste and unnecessary inventory. Additionally, the company uses every scrap from the cutting room floor to make hair scrunchies, headbands and masks. Now, the brand’s newest line, The Greta Collection, makes use of waste like fishing nets to create sustainable, durable outerwear. The newest collection continues the trend of avoiding waste during the manufacturing process but also reduces waste already in the environment by relying on ECONYL, a fiber made in Italy. ECONYL is generated from used carpets, old fishing nets and other fabric scraps. In addition to the recycling involved at the origin, the materials are endlessly recyclable at the end of the garments’ lifecycles, too. Related: Second Nature transforms abandoned fishing nets into 3D-printed seashells and bowls Marta Scarampi’s investment in ECONYL for circular fashion is referred to as The Re-Waste Project, and the initial release is the capsule The Greta Collection. It includes six pieces that can be worn for work or play. “With most of us working from home now, we shifted the focus to casual wear to match this modern lifestyle,” Marta said. “We imagine you wanting to be comfortable when you’re out on the weekends, running errands, riding your bike, and really just enjoying the present, and being you.” The capsule collection offers interchangeable options that include a parka, cape, jacket, detachable hood, belt bag and, of course, the latest universally necessary accessory, a face mask. The material for all of the products is waterproof, machine-washable and durable. If at some point you want to part with your coat or accessory, it can go back into the recycling process, directly contributing to the reduction of pollution at every stage of the cycle. Lucia said, “Even when you one day decide to discard the reusable face masks we make, the best part is knowing that it can eventually be recycled, and turned into new ECONYL® fibre again.” + Marta Scarampi Images via Marta Scarampi

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This waterproof outwear is made with fishing nets and nylon waste

A GreenBiz 20 mantra: Sustainability’s next phase is about breaking down siloes

February 6, 2020 by  
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But making this thinking a matter of second nature could take years, according to main-stage speakers at GreenBiz20.

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A GreenBiz 20 mantra: Sustainability’s next phase is about breaking down siloes

Championing diversity and inclusion requires courage, provocation, smart goals

February 6, 2020 by  
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Cultivating a culture of inclusion is easier said than done even in organizations with mature programs. And with the workforce shifting dramatically in recent years given the rise in technology and four generations learning to work together, the task remains for most diversity and inclusion leaders, quite monumental.

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Championing diversity and inclusion requires courage, provocation, smart goals

Not pulp fiction: Absolut, Coca-Cola and the paper bottle project

February 6, 2020 by  
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The two brands are part of a ‘pioneer community’ that also includes Carlsberg and L’Oreal.

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Not pulp fiction: Absolut, Coca-Cola and the paper bottle project

Second Nature transforms abandoned fishing nets into 3D-printed seashells and bowls

May 2, 2019 by  
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Did you know that ghost nets are considered among the deadliest ocean debris in the world? The term refers not to haunting specters in the water, but discarded synthetic fishing nets that pollute the seabed and trap fish, mammals and other sea creatures. To raise awareness about these abandoned fishing nets and marine plastic pollution, Rotterdam-based research and design studio The New Raw has launched a new initiative called Second Nature that’s transforming the deadly ghost nets into 3D-printed seashells, bowls and other beautiful objects. The Second Nature project begins with the collection and sorting of the ghost gear depending on material type: nets, ropes, floaters or weights. The plastic waste is then processed in a grinder to create colorful and textured filament for the  3D printing projects. Second Nature currently operates out of a mobile lab located in the small Greek village of Galaxidi. Related: Ghost gear is haunting our oceans “ Plastic is a major contributor to the pollution of the seas,” said Panos Sakkas and Foteini Setaki, founders of The New Raw. “However, living in urban regions, we tend to forget about our dependence on the sea, which is crucial to our food and oxygen supply. With Second Nature, we want to give plastic a second life.” The project also draws inspiration from five edible species of Mediterranean seashells — Mitra Zonata, Pecten Jacobeaus, Pinna Nobilis, Strombus Persicus and Tonna Galea — that are currently protected due to their intensive fishing. In giving the ghost nets a second life, Second Nature has created shell-shaped ornaments as well as a series of colorful tableware as part of its ongoing research project promoting a circular economy . The team plans to launch a new collection of objects in summer 2019 and have documented their process in a 10-minute short film by award-winning filmmaker Daphne Matziaraki, viewable here . + The New Raw Images via The New Raw

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Second Nature transforms abandoned fishing nets into 3D-printed seashells and bowls

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